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Emily St. John Mandel: IMG Powell’s Q&A: Emily St. John Mandel



Describe your latest book. My new novel is called Station Eleven. It's about a traveling Shakespearean theatre company in a post-apocalyptic North... Continue »
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    Station Eleven

    Emily St. John Mandel 9780385353304

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3 Remote Warehouse Biography- General

My Korean Deli

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My Korean Deli Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

It all starts when Ben Ryder Howes wife, whose parents emigrated from Korea, decides to repay her debt to them by buying them a deli to run. Howe, an editor at The Paris Review, reluctantly agrees to help in the venture. By day, Howe commutes to The Paris Review offices in George Plimptons apartment overlooking the East River, and at night heads to Brooklyn to slice cold cuts, peddle lottery tickets and Colt 45, and sell coffee in 8-ounce blue and gold cups bearing the logo “We are happy to serve you!”

The book follows the stores lifespan, starting a few months before the purchase and ending with the familys agonized decision to get out. Along the way, Howe allows digressions into the past, painting a cacophonous group portrait of two families from the Brooklyn ghetto to Seoul to Brahmin New England. The deli is where these cultures meet as Howe juxtaposes the two groups, outsiders versus insiders, new talent versus old money, the deli with The Paris Review. Owning the deli becomes a transformative experience for everyone involved as they struggle to keep the deli and themselves from bankruptcy while sorting out issues of class, intermarriage values, work and personal identity.

Synopsis:

This sweet and funny tale of a preppy literary editor buying a Brooklyn deli with his Korean in-laws is about family, class, culture clash, and the quest for authentic experiences in an increasingly unreal city.

It starts with a simple gift, when Ben Ryder Howe's wife, the daughter of Korean immigrants, decides to repay her parents' self-sacrifice by buying them a store. Howe, an editor at the rarefied Paris Review, reluctantly agrees to go along. However, things soon become a lot more complicated. After the business struggles, Howe finds himself living in the basement of his in-laws' Staten Island home, commuting to the Paris Review offices in George Plimpton's Upper East Side townhouse by day, and heading to Brooklyn at night to slice cold cuts and peddle lottery tickets. The book follows the store's tumultuous lifespan, and along the way paints the portrait of an extremely unlikely partnership between characters across society, from the Brooklyn ghetto to Seoul to Puritan New England. Owning the deli becomes a transformative experience for everyone involved as they struggle to salvage the original gift — and the family — while sorting out issues of values, work and identity.

About the Author

Ben Ryder Howe is a former editor of The Paris Review and a former deli owner. His writing has appeared in The New Yorker, the Atlantic Monthly, Best American Travel Writing and Outside magazine. He still lives with his wife in the basement of her familys house on Staten Island, now joined by their two children.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385664127
Subtitle:
Risking it All for a Convenience Store
Author:
Howe, Ben Ryder
Publisher:
Doubleday Canada
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20110301
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Pages:
320
Dimensions:
8.56 x 5.78 x 1.12 in .95 lb

Related Subjects

Biography » General

My Korean Deli New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$36.75 In Stock
Product details 320 pages Renouf Pub Co Ltd - English 9780385664127 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , This sweet and funny tale of a preppy literary editor buying a Brooklyn deli with his Korean in-laws is about family, class, culture clash, and the quest for authentic experiences in an increasingly unreal city.

It starts with a simple gift, when Ben Ryder Howe's wife, the daughter of Korean immigrants, decides to repay her parents' self-sacrifice by buying them a store. Howe, an editor at the rarefied Paris Review, reluctantly agrees to go along. However, things soon become a lot more complicated. After the business struggles, Howe finds himself living in the basement of his in-laws' Staten Island home, commuting to the Paris Review offices in George Plimpton's Upper East Side townhouse by day, and heading to Brooklyn at night to slice cold cuts and peddle lottery tickets. The book follows the store's tumultuous lifespan, and along the way paints the portrait of an extremely unlikely partnership between characters across society, from the Brooklyn ghetto to Seoul to Puritan New England. Owning the deli becomes a transformative experience for everyone involved as they struggle to salvage the original gift — and the family — while sorting out issues of values, work and identity.

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