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This title in other editions

Rabbit, Run

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Rabbit, Run Cover

ISBN13: 9780449911655
ISBN10: 0449911659
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Rabbit, Run is the book that established John Updike as one of the major American novelists of his—or any other—generation. Its hero is Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, a onetime high-school basketball star who on an impulse deserts his wife and son. He is twenty-six years old, a man-child caught in a struggle between instinct and thought, self and society, sexual gratification and family duty—even, in a sense, human hard-heartedness and divine Grace. Though his flight from home traces a zigzag of evasion, he holds to the faith that he is on the right path, an invisible line toward his own salvation as straight as a ruler’s edge.

Review:

John Updike's two Pulitzer Prizes were awarded to him for the last two Rabbit novels, and yet only now is the Rabbit tetralogy appearing in audio form (as indeed is its sequel, the novella "Rabbit Remembered"). A long wait, perhaps, but many of the infelicities of the early days of audio books have thus been avoided. The match between reader Arthur Morey and the life and times of Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

Harry Angstrom was a star basketball player in high school and that was the best time of his life. Now in his mid-20s, his work is unfulfilling, his marriage is moribund, and he tries to find happiness with another woman. But happiness is more elusive than a medal, and Harry must continue to run--from his wife, his life, and from himself, until he reaches the end of the road and has to turn back....

About the Author

John Updike was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania, in 1932. He graduated from Harvard College in 1954 and spent a year in Oxford, England, at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art. From 1955 to 1957 he was a member of the staff of The New Yorker. His novels have won the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Rosenthal Foundation Award, and the William Dean Howells Medal. In 2007 he received the Gold Medal for Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. John Updike died in January 2009.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

OneMansView, June 21, 2009 (view all comments by OneMansView)
Rabbit cannot outrun life’s complications (3.6 *s)

Weren’t the 1950s supposed to be the era of the organization man: a man who leads a life of prescribed normalcy without questioning? But Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, a high school basketball star of only minor repute just eight years ago, now at age twenty-six, circa 1959, a demonstrator of vegetable peelers and married to Janice with whom he has lost a sense of connection, is unable to find equanimity in his life. One night, instead of picking up his young son, he runs; his all-night automobile journey is almost directionless but he returns by morning to his small town in Pennsylvania, where he struggles over the next few months to understand his situation and get his life together.

Rabbit at first seeks refuge with his old coach, through whom he finds Ruth, a rather down and out young woman - the anti-Janice - who wants nothing to do with him, but who finally provides Harry some stability. He also encounters a youngish Rev Jack Eccles, who sees core goodness in Harry, prods him during weekly golfing sessions, and builds bridges between Harry and Janice and her family. A reconciliation with Janice is short-lived with tragic consequences, leaving Harry still, literally, running at the end.

The book has the author’s typical highly nuanced descriptions, which can at times be very awkward and difficult, making the book a bit of a slow read. Despite lengthy descriptions of the fictional towns of Brewer and Mt. Judge, they remain rather muddled. Harry is not a reflective person, but the author subtly captures his appeal, especially to women. Characterizations are a strength of the book. Eventually, the actions and thinking of Ruth, Janice, her parents, etc come to be appreciated and understood. With Harry left in such a state of uncertainty at the end of the book, it is by no means predictable where Harry will be physically or mentally in the sequel to this book.

It may be debatable as to whether Harry is worth writing about. Perhaps he can be viewed as an everyman of the 1950s, especially one who fell through the cracks. It would have been interesting to see the author address the options that Harry had out of high school. What was he actually prepared to do? Why did he slip to being a vegetable-peeler demonstrator? But then maybe authors in the 1950s didn’t question much more than their characters. The book barely slips in as a four-star.
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hornbecksmith, August 1, 2008 (view all comments by hornbecksmith)
The beginning of the best series of all times. Love Rabbit or hate him, you can't help but become invested in his story. The final book, Rabbit at Rest, is the finest, but this one sets the tone and is wonderful all on it's own.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780449911655
Author:
Updike, John
Publisher:
Random House Trade Paperbacks
Location:
New York :
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Fiction
Subject:
American
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Novels and novellas
Subject:
Grief
Subject:
Psychological fiction
Subject:
Pennsylvania
Subject:
Angstrom, harry (fictitious character)
Subject:
Middle class men
Subject:
Grief -- Fiction.
Subject:
Angstrom, Harry
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Rabbit
Series Volume:
104-311
Publication Date:
19960831
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
8.32x5.52x.74 in. .56 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Rabbit, Run New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$16.00 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Ballantine Books - English 9780449911655 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Harry Angstrom was a star basketball player in high school and that was the best time of his life. Now in his mid-20s, his work is unfulfilling, his marriage is moribund, and he tries to find happiness with another woman. But happiness is more elusive than a medal, and Harry must continue to run--from his wife, his life, and from himself, until he reaches the end of the road and has to turn back....
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