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The End of Arrogance: America in the Global Competition of Ideas

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The End of Arrogance: America in the Global Competition of Ideas Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Free-market capitalism, hegemony, Western culture, peace, and democracy--the ideas that shaped world politics in the twentieth century and underpinned American foreign policy--have lost a good deal of their strength. Authority is now more contested and power more diffuse. Hegemony (benign or otherwise) is no longer a choice, not for the United States, for China, or for anyone else.

Steven Weber and Bruce Jentleson are not declinists, but they argue that the United States must take a different stance toward the rest of the world in this, the twenty-first century. Now that we can't dominate others, we must rely on strategy, making trade-offs and focusing our efforts. And they do not mean military strategy, such as "the global war on terror." Rather, we must compete in the global marketplace of ideas--with state-directed capitalism, with charismatic authoritarian leaders, with jihadism. In politics, ideas and influence are now critical currency.

At the core of our efforts must be a new conception of the world order based on mutuality, and of a just society that inspires and embraces people around the world.

Review:

"In this concise book, Weber, a professor at Berkeley, and Jentleson, a professor at Duke, identify 'five big ideas' that dominated international politics in the 20th century: peace is better than war; benign hegemony is better than a balance of power; capitalism is better than socialism; democracy is better than dictatorship; and western culture is superior to other cultures. The authors argue that for much of the world a repressive government that achieves economic progress (as is the case in Singapore, for instance) is preferable to a democratic government that fails to improve living standards; this shift, the authors argue, needs to be understood by the American people in order for the U.S. to successfully transition from lone superpower to savvy and influential player. Though their message is far from new, it's extremely well articulated. Yet finding an audience for this book may be a challenge; it's too simplistic for foreign policy wonks and too sophisticated to find a home on Main Street.
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved." Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Book News Annotation:

Weber (political science, U. of California at Berkeley) and Jentleson (public policy and political science, Duke U.) call for an end to American arrogance in the conduct of its foreign policy and what they see as a corresponding and contingent goal of increasing American influence. They argue that the end of arrogance would entail a forward-looking perspective that recognizes the following: mutuality in world affairs and that the US should not try to dictate the rules, that the legitimacy of institutions in many global settings depends on meeting human needs as much or more than on formal processes, and a reinvigoration of purpose over power in addressing American and global needs. Over the course of the work they elaborate on these core ideas in more detail concerning primarily long range, rather than short term, issues of foreign policy. Annotation ©2010 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

About the Author

Steven Weberis Professor of Political Science, <>University of California, Berkeley.Bruce W. Jentlesonis Professor of Public Policy and Political Science at Duke University.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780674058187
Author:
Weber, Steven
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Author:
Jentleson, Bruce W.
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Political Ideologies - General
Subject:
Globalization
Subject:
Government - Comparative
Subject:
Politics - General
Subject:
POLITICAL SCIENCE / Globalization
Subject:
POLITICAL SCIENCE / Comparative Politics
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Cloth
Publication Date:
20100930
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
no illustrations
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8 x 5 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » International Studies
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » US History » Foreign Policy
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Evolution

The End of Arrogance: America in the Global Competition of Ideas Used Hardcover
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Product details 224 pages Harvard University Press - English 9780674058187 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "In this concise book, Weber, a professor at Berkeley, and Jentleson, a professor at Duke, identify 'five big ideas' that dominated international politics in the 20th century: peace is better than war; benign hegemony is better than a balance of power; capitalism is better than socialism; democracy is better than dictatorship; and western culture is superior to other cultures. The authors argue that for much of the world a repressive government that achieves economic progress (as is the case in Singapore, for instance) is preferable to a democratic government that fails to improve living standards; this shift, the authors argue, needs to be understood by the American people in order for the U.S. to successfully transition from lone superpower to savvy and influential player. Though their message is far from new, it's extremely well articulated. Yet finding an audience for this book may be a challenge; it's too simplistic for foreign policy wonks and too sophisticated to find a home on Main Street.
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved." Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
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