Tournament of Books 2015
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | January 6, 2015

    Matt Burgess: IMG 35 Seconds



    Late at night on September 22, 2014, at a housing project basketball court in Brooklyn, a white cop pushes a black man against a chain link fence.... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$45.75
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
available for shipping or prepaid pickup only
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
2 Remote Warehouse Sociology- General

More copies of this ISBN

This title in other editions

The Emergence of Organizations and Markets

by

The Emergence of Organizations and Markets Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

"The scholarship, analytical focus, and sheer energy of this work are nothing short of admirable. It will change the way historians and social scientists study large-scale economic and political transformations."--Jon Elster, Collège de France and Columbia University

"This intellectual tour de force revolutionizes how we think about social transformations. It introduces a brilliant and surprisingly effective new model of explanation based on an analogy with the biochemistry of life-forms. The model's utility is convincingly demonstrated in fascinating case studies, ranging from medieval Florence to contemporary Silicon Valley. Every social scientist interested in the problem of social change should read this book."--William H. Sewell, Jr., University of Chicago

"This book is about the old sociological truth that the substance of social structure--how it is known, how it operates, how it has effects--lies in the structure's history. That truth, here discussed in terms of network autocatalytic mechanisms, has never been said as well, as clearly, or with such profound implications for how we think about organizations and markets. A remarkable book."--Ronald S. Burt, University of Chicago

"For the social sciences, which have been far better at explaining how institutions behave than at understanding where they come from, this is a landmark book. Operating at the horizon where theory and method converge, it presents a genuinely new explanation of the emergence of novelty in a broad array of contexts. Representing social science at its best, this book will resonate through the disciplines for a long time."--Paul DiMaggio, Princeton University

"This book revitalizes the study of social, political, and economic change by linking it to the classic sociological understanding of society as interlocked institutions that borrow from and transform one another. Its rich and subtle merger of network analysis, organization theory, and historical institutionalism will catalyze a generation of new studies. It is the essential starting point for those seeking new and exciting theoretical departures."--Mark Granovetter, Stanford University

"This book is a towering achievement of methodological finesse, bridging multiple scales of structure and time to produce a polyoptic theory of organizational genesis and transformation in politics, economics, and science. A core thesis of this book is that multifunctional social actors and the heterarchical networks they induce coconstruct each other, yielding emergent organizations that shape structural and functional innovation in response to shocks. Padgett and Powell's fantastic demonstration of interdisciplinary conversation will provide systems biologists with thought-provoking ideas for developing a fresh look at the nature of emergence and evolution."--Walter Fontana, Harvard University

Synopsis:

"The scholarship, analytical focus, and sheer energy of this work are nothing short of admirable. It will change the way historians and social scientists study large-scale economic and political transformations."--Jon Elster, Collège de France and Columbia University

"This intellectual tour de force revolutionizes how we think about social transformations. It introduces a brilliant and surprisingly effective new model of explanation based on an analogy with the biochemistry of life-forms. The model's utility is convincingly demonstrated in fascinating case studies, ranging from medieval Florence to contemporary Silicon Valley. Every social scientist interested in the problem of social change should read this book."--William H. Sewell, Jr., University of Chicago

"This book is about the old sociological truth that the substance of social structure--how it is known, how it operates, how it has effects--lies in the structure's history. That truth, here discussed in terms of network autocatalytic mechanisms, has never been said as well, as clearly, or with such profound implications for how we think about organizations and markets. A remarkable book."--Ronald S. Burt, University of Chicago

"For the social sciences, which have been far better at explaining how institutions behave than at understanding where they come from, this is a landmark book. Operating at the horizon where theory and method converge, it presents a genuinely new explanation of the emergence of novelty in a broad array of contexts. Representing social science at its best, this book will resonate through the disciplines for a long time."--Paul DiMaggio, Princeton University

"This book revitalizes the study of social, political, and economic change by linking it to the classic sociological understanding of society as interlocked institutions that borrow from and transform one another. Its rich and subtle merger of network analysis, organization theory, and historical institutionalism will catalyze a generation of new studies. It is the essential starting point for those seeking new and exciting theoretical departures."--Mark Granovetter, Stanford University

"This book is a towering achievement of methodological finesse, bridging multiple scales of structure and time to produce a polyoptic theory of organizational genesis and transformation in politics, economics, and science. A core thesis of this book is that multifunctional social actors and the heterarchical networks they induce coconstruct each other, yielding emergent organizations that shape structural and functional innovation in response to shocks. Padgett and Powell's fantastic demonstration of interdisciplinary conversation will provide systems biologists with thought-provoking ideas for developing a fresh look at the nature of emergence and evolution."--Walter Fontana, Harvard University

Synopsis:

The social sciences have sophisticated models of choice and equilibrium but little understanding of the emergence of novelty. Where do new alternatives, new organizational forms, and new types of people come from? Combining biochemical insights about the origin of life with innovative and historically oriented social network analyses, John Padgett and Walter Powell develop a theory about the emergence of organizational, market, and biographical novelty from the coevolution of multiple social networks. They demonstrate that novelty arises from spillovers across intertwined networks in different domains. In the short run actors make relations, but in the long run relations make actors.

This theory of novelty emerging from intersecting production and biographical flows is developed through formal deductive modeling and through a wide range of original historical case studies. Padgett and Powell build on the biochemical concept of autocatalysis--the chemical definition of life--and then extend this autocatalytic reasoning to social processes of production and communication. Padgett and Powell, along with other colleagues, analyze a very wide range of cases of emergence. They look at the emergence of organizational novelty in early capitalism and state formation; they examine the transformation of communism; and they analyze with detailed network data contemporary science-based capitalism: the biotechnology industry, regional high-tech clusters, and the open source community.

About the Author

John F. Padgett is professor of political science and (by courtesy) professor of sociology and history at the University of Chicago. Walter W. Powell is professor of education and (by courtesy) professor of sociology, organizational behavior, management science, communication, and public policy at Stanford University.

Table of Contents

Contributors ix

List of Illustrations xiii

List of Tables xvii

Acknowledgments xix

Chapter 1 The Problem of Emergence

John F. Padgett and Walter W. Powell 1

Part I Autocatalysis 31

  • Chapter 2 Autocatalysis in Chemistry and the Origin of Life

    John F. Padgett 33

  • Chapter 3 Economic Production as Chemistry II

    John F. Padgett, Peter McMahan, and Xing Zhong 70

  • Chapter 4 From Chemical to Social Networks

    John F. Padgett 92

Part II Early Capitalism and State Formation 115

  • Chapter 5 The Emergence of Corporate Merchant-Banks in Dugento Tuscany

    John F. Padgett 121

  • Chapter 6 Transposition and Refunctionality: The Birth of Partnership Systems in Renaissance Florence

    John F. Padgett 168

  • Chapter 7 Country as Global Market: Netherlands, Calvinism, and the Joint-Stock Company

    John F. Padgett 208

  • Chapter 8 Conflict Displacement and Dual Inclusion in the Construction of Germany

    Jonathan Obert and John F. Padgett 235

Part III Communist Transitions 267

  • Chapter 9 The Politics of Communist Economic Reform: Soviet Union and China

    John F. Padgett 271

  • Chapter 10 Deviations from Design: The Emergence of New Financial Markets and Organizations in Yeltsin's Russia

    Andrew Spicer 316

  • Chapter 11 The Emergence of the Russian Mobile Telecom Market: Local Technical Leadership and Global Investors in a Shadow of the State

    Valery Yakubovich and Stanislav Shekshnia 334

  • Chapter 12 Social Sequence Analysis: Ownership Networks, Political Ties, and Foreign Investment in Hungary

    David Stark and Balázs Vedres 347

Part IV Contemporary Capitalism and Science 375

  • Chapter 13 Chance, Nécessité, et Naïveté: Ingredients to Create a New Organizational Form

    Walter W. Powell and Kurt Sandholtz 379

  • Chapter 14 Organizational and Institutional Genesis: The Emergence of High-Tech Clusters in the Life Sciences

    Walter W. Powell, Kelley Packalen, and Kjersten Whittington 434

  • Chapter 15 An Open Elite: Arbiters, Catalysts, or Gatekeepers in the Dynamics of Industry Evolution?

    Walter W. Powell and Jason Owen-Smith 466

  • Chapter 16 Academic Laboratories and the Reproduction of Proprietary Science: Modeling Organizational Rules through Autocatalytic Networks

    Jeannette A. Colyvas and Spiro Maroulis 496

  • Chapter 17 Why the Valley Went First: Aggregation and Emergence in Regional Inventor Networks

    Lee Fleming, Lyra Colfer, Alexandra Marin, and Jonathan McPhie 520

  • Chapter 18 Managing the Boundaries of an "Open" Project

    Fabrizio Ferraro and Siobhán O'Mahony 545

  • Coda: Reflections on the Study of Multiple Networks

    Walter W. Powell and John F. Padgett 566

Index of Authors 571

Index of Subjects 573

Product Details

ISBN:
9780691148878
Author:
Padgett, John F. (edt)
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Author:
Powell, Walter W.
Author:
Padgett, John F.
Subject:
Sociology - General
Subject:
Sociology
Subject:
Political Science and International Relations
Subject:
Economics
Subject:
Politics - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20121014
Binding:
Paperback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
142 color illus. 46 tables.
Pages:
608
Dimensions:
10 x 7 in

Other books you might like

  1. The Child That Books Built: A Life... Used Trade Paper $9.00
  2. Durable Inequality New Trade Paper $40.95
  3. I May Be Some Time: Ice and the... Used Trade Paper $4.50

Related Subjects

Business » Business Plans
Business » Strategy
History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General

The Emergence of Organizations and Markets New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$45.75 In Stock
Product details 608 pages Princeton University Press - English 9780691148878 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "The scholarship, analytical focus, and sheer energy of this work are nothing short of admirable. It will change the way historians and social scientists study large-scale economic and political transformations."--Jon Elster, Collège de France and Columbia University

"This intellectual tour de force revolutionizes how we think about social transformations. It introduces a brilliant and surprisingly effective new model of explanation based on an analogy with the biochemistry of life-forms. The model's utility is convincingly demonstrated in fascinating case studies, ranging from medieval Florence to contemporary Silicon Valley. Every social scientist interested in the problem of social change should read this book."--William H. Sewell, Jr., University of Chicago

"This book is about the old sociological truth that the substance of social structure--how it is known, how it operates, how it has effects--lies in the structure's history. That truth, here discussed in terms of network autocatalytic mechanisms, has never been said as well, as clearly, or with such profound implications for how we think about organizations and markets. A remarkable book."--Ronald S. Burt, University of Chicago

"For the social sciences, which have been far better at explaining how institutions behave than at understanding where they come from, this is a landmark book. Operating at the horizon where theory and method converge, it presents a genuinely new explanation of the emergence of novelty in a broad array of contexts. Representing social science at its best, this book will resonate through the disciplines for a long time."--Paul DiMaggio, Princeton University

"This book revitalizes the study of social, political, and economic change by linking it to the classic sociological understanding of society as interlocked institutions that borrow from and transform one another. Its rich and subtle merger of network analysis, organization theory, and historical institutionalism will catalyze a generation of new studies. It is the essential starting point for those seeking new and exciting theoretical departures."--Mark Granovetter, Stanford University

"This book is a towering achievement of methodological finesse, bridging multiple scales of structure and time to produce a polyoptic theory of organizational genesis and transformation in politics, economics, and science. A core thesis of this book is that multifunctional social actors and the heterarchical networks they induce coconstruct each other, yielding emergent organizations that shape structural and functional innovation in response to shocks. Padgett and Powell's fantastic demonstration of interdisciplinary conversation will provide systems biologists with thought-provoking ideas for developing a fresh look at the nature of emergence and evolution."--Walter Fontana, Harvard University

"Synopsis" by , The social sciences have sophisticated models of choice and equilibrium but little understanding of the emergence of novelty. Where do new alternatives, new organizational forms, and new types of people come from? Combining biochemical insights about the origin of life with innovative and historically oriented social network analyses, John Padgett and Walter Powell develop a theory about the emergence of organizational, market, and biographical novelty from the coevolution of multiple social networks. They demonstrate that novelty arises from spillovers across intertwined networks in different domains. In the short run actors make relations, but in the long run relations make actors.

This theory of novelty emerging from intersecting production and biographical flows is developed through formal deductive modeling and through a wide range of original historical case studies. Padgett and Powell build on the biochemical concept of autocatalysis--the chemical definition of life--and then extend this autocatalytic reasoning to social processes of production and communication. Padgett and Powell, along with other colleagues, analyze a very wide range of cases of emergence. They look at the emergence of organizational novelty in early capitalism and state formation; they examine the transformation of communism; and they analyze with detailed network data contemporary science-based capitalism: the biotechnology industry, regional high-tech clusters, and the open source community.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.