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Emmy and the Incredible Shrinking Rat

by

Emmy and the Incredible Shrinking Rat Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Emmy was a good girl.At least she tried very hard to be good. She did her homework without being told. She ate all her vegetables, even the slimy ones. And she never talked back to her nanny, Miss Barmy, although it was almost impossible to keep quiet, some days.

She really was a little too good. Which is why she liked to sit by the Rat. The Rat was not good at all . . .

Hilarious, inventive, and irresistably rodent-friendly, this is a fantastic first novel from acclaimed picture book author Lynne Jonell.

The Rat was not good at all. When the children at Grayson Lake Elementary reached in to feed him, he snapped at their fingers. When they had a little trouble with fractions, he sneered. And he often made cutting remarks in a low voice when the teacher was just out of earshot.

Emmy was the only one who heard him. And even she wondered sometimes if she were just imagining things.

One Wednesday in May, when not one person had seemed to notice her all morning, Emmy asked to stay indoors for recess. “I have spelling to study,” she explained to Mr. Herbifore.

The teacher, hurrying out after his class, didnt look at her as he nodded permission. At least Emmy thought he had nodded…

“Thank you,” said Emmy. And then she heard something that soundedoddlylike a snort. She looked at the Rat, and he snorted again. He was scowling, as usual.

“Why are you always so mean?” Emmy wondered aloud.

She didnt expect the Rat to answer. She had tried to speak to him before, and he had always pretended not to hear.

But this time he curled his upper lip. “Why are you always so good?”

Emmy was too startled to respond.

The Rat shrugged one furry shoulder. “It doesnt get you anywhere. Just look at youmissing recess to study words you could spell in your sleepand the only thing that happens is, you get ignored.”

Emmy looked away. It was true. She didnt want to tell the Rat, but she didnt mind missing recess at all. For Emmy, recess was a time when she felt more alone than ever.

“The bad ones get all the attention,” said the Rat. “Try being bad for once. You might like it.”

Review:

"Jonell's (the Christopher and Robbie picture books) first novel is a lustrous affair, a droll fantasy with an old-fashioned sweep and a positively cinematic cast. The beginning will hook readers right away: the class pet, a rat, mocks the protagonist for being too good. 'It doesn't get you anywhere,' he tells her. 'The only thing that happens is, you get ignored.' When the teacher doesn't even seem to see the girl a few pages later, the rat has made his case for being bad, and Jonell has launched a truly labyrinthine plot involving prodigally endowed rodents and nefarious schemers with entangled pasts. Emmy, the heroine, must face down evil nanny Jane Barmy and win back the love of her parents, former booksellers who, since inheriting Great-Great-Uncle William's fortune, spend all their time jet-setting and buying themselves the very best of everything. Her challenge increases when the rat — freed by Emmy, one of the few characters who can hear him talk — accidentally shrinks her to his size. Jonell's villains aren't too frightening to be good targets for jokes, and the rat serves as an excellent comic foil. Occasionally the eccentricities of the plot sidetrack the action or otherwise bog down the pacing, but for the most part the narrative proceeds at an assured clip. To top off the fun, Bean (At Night and The Apple Pie That Papa Baked, both reviewed above) decorates the margins with drawings that produce a flip-book effect: the rat falls from the bough of a tree, covering his eyes as he somersaults backward in mid-air to land in Emmy's outstretched hand. Ages 9-up. (Aug.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

A lonely girl, a cantankerous talking rat, and a nanny who is doing very, very bad things . . .

Synopsis:

Hilarious, inventive, and rodent-friendly, this fantastic first novel by acclaimed picture book author Jonell features a lonely girl, a cantankerous talking rat, and a nanny who is doing very, "very" bad things. Includes a fun flip-book feature. Illustrations.

Synopsis:

Emmy was a good girl.At least she tried very hard to be good. She did her homework without being told. She ate all her vegetables, even the slimy ones. And she never talked back to her nanny, Miss Barmy, although it was almost impossible to keep quiet, some days.

She really was a little too good. Which is why she liked to sit by the Rat. The Rat was not good at all . . .

Hilarious, inventive, and irresistably rodent-friendly, this is a fantastic first novel from acclaimed picture book author Lynne Jonell.

About the Author

Lynne Jonell is the author of the novels Emmy and the Home for Troubled Girls and The Secret of Zoom, as well as several critically acclaimed picture books. Her books have been named Junior Library Guild Selections and a Smithsonian Notable Book, among numerous other honors. She teaches writing at the Loft Literary Center and lives with her husband and two sons in Plymouth, Minnesota.
 
Jonathan Bean has a masters degree in illustration from the School of Visual Arts in New York. He has illustrated several books for young readers, including Mokie and Bik. He lives in New York City.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780805081503
Author:
Jonell, Lynne
Publisher:
Henry Holt & Company
Illustrator:
Bean, Jonathan
Author:
Bean, Jonathan
Subject:
Science Fiction, Fantasy, & Magic
Subject:
Humorous Stories
Subject:
Rodents
Subject:
Situations / Friendship
Subject:
Social Issues - Friendship
Subject:
Animals - Mice Hamsters Guinea Pigs etc.
Subject:
Fantasy & Magic
Subject:
Humorous fiction
Subject:
Fantasy
Subject:
Magic
Subject:
Children s humor
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Middle-Grade Fiction
Series Volume:
1
Publication Date:
20070831
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
from 4 up to 7
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Black-and-white halftone illustrations
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.50 in
Age Level:
08-12

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Related Subjects

Children's » Humor
Children's » Middle Readers » General
Children's » Science Fiction and Fantasy » General
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Friendship

Emmy and the Incredible Shrinking Rat New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$17.99 In Stock
Product details 352 pages Henry Holt & Company - English 9780805081503 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Jonell's (the Christopher and Robbie picture books) first novel is a lustrous affair, a droll fantasy with an old-fashioned sweep and a positively cinematic cast. The beginning will hook readers right away: the class pet, a rat, mocks the protagonist for being too good. 'It doesn't get you anywhere,' he tells her. 'The only thing that happens is, you get ignored.' When the teacher doesn't even seem to see the girl a few pages later, the rat has made his case for being bad, and Jonell has launched a truly labyrinthine plot involving prodigally endowed rodents and nefarious schemers with entangled pasts. Emmy, the heroine, must face down evil nanny Jane Barmy and win back the love of her parents, former booksellers who, since inheriting Great-Great-Uncle William's fortune, spend all their time jet-setting and buying themselves the very best of everything. Her challenge increases when the rat — freed by Emmy, one of the few characters who can hear him talk — accidentally shrinks her to his size. Jonell's villains aren't too frightening to be good targets for jokes, and the rat serves as an excellent comic foil. Occasionally the eccentricities of the plot sidetrack the action or otherwise bog down the pacing, but for the most part the narrative proceeds at an assured clip. To top off the fun, Bean (At Night and The Apple Pie That Papa Baked, both reviewed above) decorates the margins with drawings that produce a flip-book effect: the rat falls from the bough of a tree, covering his eyes as he somersaults backward in mid-air to land in Emmy's outstretched hand. Ages 9-up. (Aug.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by ,
A lonely girl, a cantankerous talking rat, and a nanny who is doing very, very bad things . . .
"Synopsis" by , Hilarious, inventive, and rodent-friendly, this fantastic first novel by acclaimed picture book author Jonell features a lonely girl, a cantankerous talking rat, and a nanny who is doing very, "very" bad things. Includes a fun flip-book feature. Illustrations.
"Synopsis" by ,
Emmy was a good girl.At least she tried very hard to be good. She did her homework without being told. She ate all her vegetables, even the slimy ones. And she never talked back to her nanny, Miss Barmy, although it was almost impossible to keep quiet, some days.

She really was a little too good. Which is why she liked to sit by the Rat. The Rat was not good at all . . .

Hilarious, inventive, and irresistably rodent-friendly, this is a fantastic first novel from acclaimed picture book author Lynne Jonell.

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