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This title in other editions

Every Last One

by

Every Last One Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In this breathtaking and beautiful novel, the #1 New York Times bestselling author Anna Quindlen creates an unforgettable portrait of a mother, a father, a family, and the explosive, violent consequences of what seem like inconsequential actions.

Mary Beth Latham is first and foremost a mother, whose three teenaged children come first, before her career as a landscape gardener, or even her life as the wife of a doctor. Caring for her family and preserving their everyday life is paramount. And so, when one of her sons, Max, becomes depressed, Mary Beth becomes focused on him, and is blindsided by a shocking act of violence. What happens afterwards is a testament to the power of a woman’s love and determination, and to the invisible line of hope and healing that connects one human being with another. Ultimately, in the hands of Anna Quindlen’s mesmerizing prose, Every Last One is a novel about facing every last one of the the things we fear most, about finding ways to navigate a road we never intended to travel, to live a life we never dreamed we’d have to live but must be brave enough to try.

Review:

"Spellbinding." The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"In a tale that rings strikingly true, [Anna] Quindlen captures both the beauty and the breathtaking fragility of family life." People

Review:

"We come to love this family, because Quindlen makes their ordinary lives so fascinating, their mundane interactions engaging and important....Never read a book that made you cry? Be prepared for a deluge of tears." USA Today

Review:

"Anna Quindlen's writing is like knitting; prose that wraps the reader in the warmth and familiarity of domestic life....Then, as in her novels Black and Blue and One True Thing, Quindlen starts to pull at the world she has knitted, and lets it unravel across the pages." The Seattle Times

Review:

"Packs an emotional punch....Quindlen succeeds at conveying the transience of everyday worries and the never-ending boundaries of a mother's love." The Washington Post

Review:

"A wise, closely observed, achingly eloquent book." The Huffington Post

Review:

"If you pick up Every Last One to read a few pages after dinner, you'll want to read another chapter, and another and another, until you get to bed late." Associated Press

Review:

"Quindlen conjures family life from a palette of finely observed details." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"[Quindlen's] emotional sophistication, and her journalistic eye for authentic dialogue and detail, bring the ring of truth to every page of this heartbreakingly timely novel." NPR

Synopsis:

Mary Beth Latham has built her life around her family, around caring for her three teenage children and preserving the rituals of their daily life. When one of her sons becomes depressed, Mary Beth focuses on him, only to be blindsided by a shocking act of violence. What happens afterward is a testament to the power of a woman’s love and determination, and to the invisible lines of hope and healing that connect one human being to another. Ultimately, as rendered in Anna Quindlen’s mesmerizing prose, Every Last One is a novel about facing every last one of the things we fear the most, about finding ways to navigate a road we never intended to travel.

About the Author

Anna Quindlen is the author of five bestselling novels (Rise and Shine, Blessings, Object Lessons, One True Thing, Black and Blue), and six nonfiction books (Being Perfect, Loud & Clear, A Short Guide to a Happy Life, Living Out Loud, Thinking Out Loud, How Reading Changed My Life). She has also written two children's books (The Tree That Came to Stay, Happily Ever After). Her New York Times column "Public and Private" won the Pulitzer Prize in 1992. Her column now appears every other week in Newsweek.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

sentina, January 19, 2012 (view all comments by sentina)
Along with startlingly clear insight into and descriptions of family members, interactions, and dynamics, this story is like a huge punch in the gut about the possible unexpected traumas and agonies that will far outweigh the common daily irritations and disappointments that we so often mistakenly see as so important. It really puts one's values and focuses in perspective and helps us understand how people can keep on living when it seems like they can't. Value the present, love your family now; don't wait for it to be perfect, or you might miss your chance to love them while they are here.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Prentise, October 1, 2011 (view all comments by Prentise)
I've been on a binge lately of reading books and authors that I've heard a lot about, and I'm learning they are popular for good reasons. When I look at Anna Quindlen's picture, I think she appears too young to write with such depth and maturity about such complex and serious issues, relationships, events, and emotions. Even though the cover tells about sudden violence exploding into these people's lives, it comes so suddenly and without warning, just like it would in real life, that is painfully, sickeningly believable/unbelievable. Somehow, I couldn't stop reading, even though I didn't want to believe what had happened, just like I wouldn't want to believe it if it happened in my family. I wanted to feel the depths of the mother/wife's experience, her resolution, her conflict, her pain, how other people interact with her -- her family, friends, neighbors, associates, foes, therapist, strangers, dog ... how she goes on living, how violence is taking place frequently everywhere and her tragedy starts to diminish in the minds of others. Even though I couldn't stop reading this book every chance I got until it was finished, I was still relieved when it was over; it is interesting that every book has to end somewhere, and this one's ending leaves you with the feeling of this woman's life going on, day by day, year by year, always with the memories of what happened and who is missing, but being strong and choosing to accept happiness when it comes, and choosing to stay alive and purposeful when it doesn't.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Prentise, October 1, 2011 (view all comments by Prentise)
I've been on a binge lately of reading books and authors that I've heard a lot about, and I'm learning they are popular for good reasons. When I look at Anna Quindlen's picture, I think she appears too young to write with such depth and maturity about such complex and serious issues, relationships, events, and emotions. Even though the cover tells about sudden violence exploding into these people's lives, it comes so suddenly and without warning, just like it would in real life, that is painfully, sickeningly believable/unbelievable. Somehow, I couldn't stop reading, even though I didn't want to believe what had happened, just like I wouldn't want to believe it if it happened in my family. I wanted to feel the depths of the mother/wife's experience, her resolution, her conflict, her pain, how other people interact with her -- her family, friends, neighbors, associates, foes, therapist, strangers, dog ... how she goes on living, how violence is taking place frequently everywhere and her tragedy starts to diminish in the minds of others. Even though I couldn't stop reading this book every chance I got until it was finished, I was still relieved when it was over; it is interesting that every book has to end somewhere, and this one's ending leaves you with the feeling of this woman's life going on, day by day, year by year, always with the memories of what happened and who is missing, but being strong and choosing to accept happiness when it comes, and choosing to stay alive and purposeful when it doesn't.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780812976885
Author:
Quindlen, Anna
Publisher:
Random House Trade
Subject:
General
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Literary
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20110331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
7.98 x 5.15 x .73 in .56 lb

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Contemporary Women
History and Social Science » American Studies » Popular Culture

Every Last One New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$15.00 In Stock
Product details 352 pages Random House Trade - English 9780812976885 Reviews:
"Review" by , "Spellbinding."
"Review" by , "In a tale that rings strikingly true, [Anna] Quindlen captures both the beauty and the breathtaking fragility of family life."
"Review" by , "We come to love this family, because Quindlen makes their ordinary lives so fascinating, their mundane interactions engaging and important....Never read a book that made you cry? Be prepared for a deluge of tears."
"Review" by , "Anna Quindlen's writing is like knitting; prose that wraps the reader in the warmth and familiarity of domestic life....Then, as in her novels Black and Blue and One True Thing, Quindlen starts to pull at the world she has knitted, and lets it unravel across the pages."
"Review" by , "Packs an emotional punch....Quindlen succeeds at conveying the transience of everyday worries and the never-ending boundaries of a mother's love."
"Review" by , "A wise, closely observed, achingly eloquent book."
"Review" by , "If you pick up Every Last One to read a few pages after dinner, you'll want to read another chapter, and another and another, until you get to bed late."
"Review" by , "Quindlen conjures family life from a palette of finely observed details."
"Review" by , "[Quindlen's] emotional sophistication, and her journalistic eye for authentic dialogue and detail, bring the ring of truth to every page of this heartbreakingly timely novel."
"Synopsis" by , Mary Beth Latham has built her life around her family, around caring for her three teenage children and preserving the rituals of their daily life. When one of her sons becomes depressed, Mary Beth focuses on him, only to be blindsided by a shocking act of violence. What happens afterward is a testament to the power of a woman’s love and determination, and to the invisible lines of hope and healing that connect one human being to another. Ultimately, as rendered in Anna Quindlen’s mesmerizing prose, Every Last One is a novel about facing every last one of the things we fear the most, about finding ways to navigate a road we never intended to travel.
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