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More copies of this ISBN

This title in other editions

Other titles in the Latinidad: Transnational Cultures in the United States series:

Disenchanting Citizenship (Latinidad: Transnational Cultures in the United States)

by

Disenchanting Citizenship (Latinidad: Transnational Cultures in the United States) Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Between 2000 and 2011, eight million immigrants became American citizens. In naturalization ceremonies large and small these new Americans pledged an oath of allegiance to the United States, gaining the right to vote, serve on juries, and hold political office; access to certain jobs; and the legal rights of full citizens.and#160;

Inand#160;The Road to Citizenship, Sofya Aptekar analyzes what the process of becoming a citizen means for these newly minted Americans and what it means for the United States as a whole. Examining the evolution of the discursive role of immigrants in American society from potential traitors to morally superior andldquo;supercitizens,andrdquo; Aptekarandrsquo;s in-depth research uncovers considerable contradictions with the way naturalization works today. Census data reveal that citizenship is distributed in ways that increasingly exacerbate existing class and racial inequalities, at the same time that immigrantsandrsquo; own understandings of naturalization defy accepted stories we tell about assimilation, citizenship, and becoming American. Aptekar contends that debates about immigration must be broadened beyond the current focus on borders and documentation to include larger questions about the definition of citizenship.and#160;

Aptekarandrsquo;s work brings into sharp relief key questions about the overall system: does the current naturalization process accurately reflect our priorities as a nation and reflect the values we wish to instill in new residents and citizens? Should barriers to full membership in the American polity be lowered? What are the implications of keeping the process the same or changing it? Using archival research, interviews, analysis of census and survey data, and participant observation of citizenship ceremonies,and#160;The Road to Citizenshipand#160;demonstrates the ways in which naturalization itself reflects the larger operations of social cohesion and democracy in America.

Synopsis:

Luis F. B. Plascenciaandrsquo;s Disenchanting Citizenship explores two interrelated issues: U.S. citizenship and the Mexican migrantsandrsquo; position in the United States. Through an extensive and multifaceted collection of interviews, ethnographic fieldwork, ethno-historical research, and public policy analysis, Plascencia probes the ways in which citizenshiop discourses are understood and taken up by individuals. The book uncovers citizenshipandrsquo;s root as a Janus-faced and#160;construct that encompasses a simultaneous process of inclusion and exclusion. This notion of citizenship is mapped on to the migrant experience, arguing that the acquisition of citizenship can lead to disenchantment with the very status desired. Using the experience of Mexican migrants, Plascencia expands the understanding of the dynamics of U.S. citizenship as a form of membership and belonging.

and#160;

Synopsis:

.

Synopsis:

In The Road to Citizenship, Sofya Aptekar analyzes what the process of becoming a citizen means for newly minted Americans and what it means for the United States as a whole. Examining the evolution of the discursive role of immigrants in the American society, immigrantsandrsquo; own understandings of naturalization, and the growing inequality in who gets citizenship, Aptekarandrsquo;s in-depth research uncovers considerable contradictions in the way and#160;naturalization works today. Aptekar contends that debates about immigration must be broadened beyond the current focus on borders and documentation to include larger questions about the definition of citizenship.and#160;

Synopsis:

Through interviews with three generations of Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs (andldquo;Yalaltecosandrdquo;) in Los Angeles and Yalandaacute;lag, Oaxaca, Adriana Cruz-Manjarrez examines the impact of international migration on this community, tracing five decades of migration to Los Angeles to delineate migration patterns, community formation in Los Angeles, and the emergence of transnational identities of the first and second generations of Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs in the U.S.

Synopsis:

Through interviews with three generations of Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs (andldquo;Yalandaacute;ltecosandrdquo;) in Los Angeles and Yalandaacute;lag, Oaxaca, this book examines the impact of international migration on this community. It traces five decades of migration to Los Angeles in order to delineate migration patterns, community formation in Los Angeles, and the emergence of transnational identities of the first and second generations of Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs in the United States, exploring why these immigrants and their descendents now think of themselves as Mexican, Mexican Indian immigrants, Oaxaqueandntilde;os, and Latinosandmdash;identities they did not claim in Mexico.

Based on multi-site fieldwork conducted over a five-year period, Adriana Cruz-Manjarrez analyzes how and why Yalandaacute;lag Zapotec identity and culture have been reconfigured in the United States, using such cultural practices as music, dance, and religious rituals as a lens to bring this dynamic process into focus. By illustrating the sociocultural, economic, and political practices that link immigrants in Los Angeles to those left behind, the book documents how transnational migration has reflected, shaped, and transformed these practices in both their place of origin and immigration.

Synopsis:

A Place to Be is the first book to explore migration dynamics and community settlement among Brazilian, Guatemalan, and Mexican immigrants in America's new South. The book adopts a fresh perspective to explore patterns of settlement in Florida, including the outlying areas of Miami and beyond. The stellar contributors from Latin America and the United States address the challenges faced by Latino immigrants, their cultural and religious practices, as well as the strategies used, as they move into areas experiencing recent large-scale immigration.

Contributors to this volume include Patricia Fortuny Loret de Mola, Carol Girón Solórzano, Silvia Irene Palma, Lúcia Ribeiro, Mirian Solfs Lizama, José Claúdio Souza Alves, Timothy J. Steigenga, Manuel A. Vásquez, and Philip J. Williams.

About the Author

LUIS F. B. PLASCENCIA is an assistant professor of anthropology and affiliated faculty in the School of Transborder Studies and the School of Public Affairs at Arizona State University. and#160;He has published articles in numerous journals, including Urban Anthropology and International Migration Review.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

1. Fields of Citizenship

2. The Janus Face of Citizenship: The Side of Inclusion

3. The Janus Face of Citizenship: The Side of Exclusion

4. The Making of Citizens: Promoting and Schooling

5. Bearing True Faith and Allegiance: Entering the Circle of Citizenship

6. Desire, Sacrifice, and Disenchantment

Conclusion

Epilogue

Notes

Works Cited

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780813552804
Author:
Plascencia, Luis F. B.
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press
Author:
Cruz-Manjarrez, Adriana
Author:
&
Author:
Steigenga, Timothy
Author:
Plascencia, Luis
Author:
Alves, Jos
Author:
Williams, Philip
Author:
Patricia Fortuny Loret de Mola
Author:
squez, Manuel A.
Author:
Manuel A. V
Author:
Palma, Silvia
Author:
eacute
Author:
Solorzano, Carol
Author:
squez
Author:
aacute
Author:
Ribeiro, Lucia
Author:
Aptekar, Sofya
Author:
V
Author:
Alves
Author:
Lizama, Mirian
Author:
de Mola, Patricia Fortuny Loret
Author:
Jos
Subject:
anthropology;cultural anthropology
Subject:
Sociology - General
Subject:
Emigration & Immigration
Subject:
naturalization practices and laws
Subject:
and#160;citizenship ceremonies
Subject:
Anthropology - Cultural
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Cloth
Series:
Latinidad: Transnational Cultures in the United States
Publication Date:
20120631
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
5 tables
Pages:
176
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Anthropology » Cultural Anthropology
History and Social Science » Anthropology » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Hispanic American Studies
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics
History and Social Science » World History » General
Hobbies, Crafts, and Leisure » Games » Crossword Puzzles » General
Reference » General
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Winter Sports » Ice Skating
Young Adult » General

Disenchanting Citizenship (Latinidad: Transnational Cultures in the United States) New Trade Paper
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$27.95 In Stock
Product details 176 pages Rutgers University Press - English 9780813552804 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

Luis F. B. Plascenciaandrsquo;s Disenchanting Citizenship explores two interrelated issues: U.S. citizenship and the Mexican migrantsandrsquo; position in the United States. Through an extensive and multifaceted collection of interviews, ethnographic fieldwork, ethno-historical research, and public policy analysis, Plascencia probes the ways in which citizenshiop discourses are understood and taken up by individuals. The book uncovers citizenshipandrsquo;s root as a Janus-faced and#160;construct that encompasses a simultaneous process of inclusion and exclusion. This notion of citizenship is mapped on to the migrant experience, arguing that the acquisition of citizenship can lead to disenchantment with the very status desired. Using the experience of Mexican migrants, Plascencia expands the understanding of the dynamics of U.S. citizenship as a form of membership and belonging.

and#160;

"Synopsis" by ,
.

"Synopsis" by ,
In The Road to Citizenship, Sofya Aptekar analyzes what the process of becoming a citizen means for newly minted Americans and what it means for the United States as a whole. Examining the evolution of the discursive role of immigrants in the American society, immigrantsandrsquo; own understandings of naturalization, and the growing inequality in who gets citizenship, Aptekarandrsquo;s in-depth research uncovers considerable contradictions in the way and#160;naturalization works today. Aptekar contends that debates about immigration must be broadened beyond the current focus on borders and documentation to include larger questions about the definition of citizenship.and#160;
"Synopsis" by ,

Through interviews with three generations of Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs (andldquo;Yalaltecosandrdquo;) in Los Angeles and Yalandaacute;lag, Oaxaca, Adriana Cruz-Manjarrez examines the impact of international migration on this community, tracing five decades of migration to Los Angeles to delineate migration patterns, community formation in Los Angeles, and the emergence of transnational identities of the first and second generations of Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs in the U.S.

"Synopsis" by ,
Through interviews with three generations of Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs (andldquo;Yalandaacute;ltecosandrdquo;) in Los Angeles and Yalandaacute;lag, Oaxaca, this book examines the impact of international migration on this community. It traces five decades of migration to Los Angeles in order to delineate migration patterns, community formation in Los Angeles, and the emergence of transnational identities of the first and second generations of Yalandaacute;lag Zapotecs in the United States, exploring why these immigrants and their descendents now think of themselves as Mexican, Mexican Indian immigrants, Oaxaqueandntilde;os, and Latinosandmdash;identities they did not claim in Mexico.

Based on multi-site fieldwork conducted over a five-year period, Adriana Cruz-Manjarrez analyzes how and why Yalandaacute;lag Zapotec identity and culture have been reconfigured in the United States, using such cultural practices as music, dance, and religious rituals as a lens to bring this dynamic process into focus. By illustrating the sociocultural, economic, and political practices that link immigrants in Los Angeles to those left behind, the book documents how transnational migration has reflected, shaped, and transformed these practices in both their place of origin and immigration.

"Synopsis" by ,
A Place to Be is the first book to explore migration dynamics and community settlement among Brazilian, Guatemalan, and Mexican immigrants in America's new South. The book adopts a fresh perspective to explore patterns of settlement in Florida, including the outlying areas of Miami and beyond. The stellar contributors from Latin America and the United States address the challenges faced by Latino immigrants, their cultural and religious practices, as well as the strategies used, as they move into areas experiencing recent large-scale immigration.

Contributors to this volume include Patricia Fortuny Loret de Mola, Carol Girón Solórzano, Silvia Irene Palma, Lúcia Ribeiro, Mirian Solfs Lizama, José Claúdio Souza Alves, Timothy J. Steigenga, Manuel A. Vásquez, and Philip J. Williams.

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