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This title in other editions

Watching While Black: Centering the Television of Black Audiences

by

Watching While Black: Centering the Television of Black Audiences Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Television scholarship has substantially ignored programming aimed at Black audiences despite a few sweeping histories and critiques. In this volume, the first of its kind, contributors examine the televisual diversity, complexity, and cultural imperatives manifest in programming directed at a Black and marginalized audience.

Watching While Black considers its subject from an entirely new angle in an attempt to understand the lives, motivations, distinctions, kindred lines, and individuality of various Black groups and suggest what television might be like if such diversity permeated beyond specialized enclaves. It looks at the macro structures of ownership, producing, casting, and advertising that all inform production, and then delves into television programming crafted to appeal to black audiencesandmdash;historic and contemporary, domestic and worldwide.

Chapters rethink such historically significant programs as Roots and Black Journal, such seemingly innocuous programs as Fat Albert and broandrsquo;Town, and such contemporary and culturally complicated programs as Noahandrsquo;s Arc, Treme, and The Boondocks. The book makes a case for the centrality of these programs while always recognizing the racial dynamics that continue to shape Black representation on the small screen. and#160;Painting a decidedly introspective portrait across forty years of Black television, Watching While Black sheds much-needed light on under-examined demographics, broadens common audience considerations, and gives deference to the the preferences of audiences and producers of Black-targeted programming.

and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;and#160;

Synopsis:

Watching While Black exclusively considers and critically engages programs that Black audiences watch and enjoy. With fresh perspectives, contributors both expose and introduce programming targeted at very specific and under-examined Black demographics. Cutting across forty years of Black television, the book looks at behind-the-scenes practices, significant historical texts, twenty-first century shows, and programs produced for Black audiences around the world.

Synopsis:

Race and Retail documents the extent to which retail establishments, both past and present, have often catered to specific ethnic and racial groups. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the original essays collected here explore selling and buying practices of nonwhite populations around the world and the barriers that shape these habits, such as racial discrimination, food deserts, and gentrification.
and#160;
and#160;

Synopsis:

The Blacker the Ink is the first collection to explore not only the diverse range of black characters in comics, but also the multitude of ways that black artists, writers, and publishers have made a mark on the industry. The bookandrsquo;s fifteen original essays take us on a journey that includes familiar milestones like Luke Cage and The Boondocks, while spanning everything from African American newspaper comics of the 1930s to Francophone graphic novels of the 2000s.and#160;
and#160;

Synopsis:

When many think of comic books the first thing that comes to mind are caped crusaders and spandex-wearing super-heroes. Perhaps, inevitably, these images are of white men (and more rarely, women). It was not until the 1970s that African American superheroes such as Luke Cage, Blade, and others emerged. But as this exciting new collection reveals, these superhero comics are only one small component in a wealth of representations of black characters within comic strips, comic books, and graphic novels over the past century.and#160;
and#160;
The Blacker the Ink is the first book to explore not only the diverse range of black characters in comics, but also the multitude of ways that black artists, writers, and publishers have made a mark on the industry. Organized thematically into andldquo;panelsandrdquo; in tribute to sequential art published in the funny pages of newspapers, the fifteen original essays take us on a journey that reaches from the African American newspaper comics of the 1930s to the Francophone graphic novels of the 2000s. Even as it demonstrates the wide spectrum of images of African Americans in comics and sequential art, the collection also identifies common character types and themes running through everything from the strip The Boondocks to the graphic novel Nat Turner.and#160;
and#160;
Though it does not shy away from examining the legacy of racial stereotypes in comics and racial biases in the industry, The Blacker the Ink also offers inspiring stories of trailblazing African American artists and writers. Whether you are a diehard comic book fan or a casual reader of the funny pages, these essays will give you a new appreciation for how black characters and creators have brought a vibrant splash of color to the world of comics. and#160;

and#160;

and#160;
and#160;

Synopsis:

Race has long shaped shopping experiences for many Americans. Retail exchanges and establishments have made headlines as flashpoints for conflict not only between blacks and whites, but also between whites, Mexicans, Asian Americans, and a wide variety of other ethnic groups, who have at times found themselves unwelcome at white-owned businesses.and#160;
and#160;
Race and Retail documents the extent to which retail establishments, both past and present, have often catered to specific ethnic and racial groups. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the original essays collected here explore selling and buying practices of nonwhite populations around the world and the barriers that shape these habits, such as racial discrimination, food deserts, and gentrification. The contributors highlight more contemporary issues by raising questions about how race informs business ownersandrsquo; ideas about consumer demand, resulting in substandard quality and higher prices for minorities than in predominantly white neighborhoods. and#160;In a wide-ranging exploration of the subject, they also address revitalization and gentrification in South Korean and Latino neighborhoods in California, Arab and Turkish coffeehouses and hookah lounges in South Paterson, New Jersey, and tourist capoeira consumption in Brazil. and#160;
and#160;
Race and Retail illuminates the complex play of forces at work in racialized retail markets and the everyday impact of those forces on minority consumers. The essays demonstrate how past practice remains in force in subtle and not-so-subtle ways.
and#160;
and#160;

About the Author

MIA BAY is a professor of history and co-director of the Rutgers Center for Race and Ethnicity at Rutgers University. She is the author of The White Image in the Black Mind: African-American Ideas About White People 1830andndash;1925.and#160;

ANN FABIAN is a distinguished professor of history and co-director of the Rutgers Center for Race and Ethnicity at Rutgers University. She is the author of The Skull Collectors: Race, Science, and Americaandrsquo;s Unburied Dead.and#160;

and#160;

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Part I

1. The Importance of Roots

2. Two Different Worlds

3. A Black Cast Doesnandrsquo;t Make a Black Show

4. Blacks in the Future

Part II

5. andldquo;Regular Television Put to Shame by Negro Productionandrdquo;

6. andldquo;HEY, HEY, HEY!andrdquo; Bill Cosbyandrsquo;s Fat Albert as Psychodynamic Postmodern Play

7. Gimme a Break! and the Limits of the Modern Mammy

8. Down in the Treme . . . Buck Jumping and Having Fun?

Part III

9. Keepinandrsquo; It Reality Television

10. Prioritized: The Hip Hop (Re)Construction of Black Womanhood in Girlfriends and The Game

11. Nigger, Coon, Boy, Punk, Homo, Faggot, Black Man

12. Graphic Blackness/Anime Noir

Part IV

13. Resistance Televised

14. South African Soapies

15. Minority Television Trade as Cultural Journey

Notes on Contributors

Index

Product Details

ISBN:
9780813553863
Author:
Smith-shomade, Beretta E. (edt)
Publisher:
Rutgers University Press
Author:
Anderson, Reynaldo
Author:
Bay, MIA
Author:
Wanzo, Rebecca
Author:
Pierson, Eric
Author:
Porter, Sharese N.
Author:
Cavalcante, Andre
Author:
Carter-David, Siobhan
Author:
Eth
Author:
Havens, Timothy
Author:
Cadava, Geraldo L.
Author:
McWilliams, Sally
Author:
Fischer, Craig
Author:
LeDuff
Author:
o, Johana
Author:
Cunningham, Mark D.
Author:
Parker, Traci
Author:
Coleman, Robin Means
Author:
lez
Author:
Nishikawa, Kinohi
Author:
Londoand#241
Author:
Gateward, Frances
Author:
Walter, Patrick F.
Author:
LeDuff, Kim M.
Author:
lez, Erualdo R.
Author:
Russworm, TreaAndrea M.
Author:
Williams, Jerome D.
Author:
Smith-Shomade, Beretta
Author:
Sutton, Stacey A.
Author:
Ziegler, James J.
Author:
Goldstein, Nancy
Author:
Kim M.
Author:
o
Author:
Heitner, Devorah
Author:
Kwate, Naa Oyo A.
Author:
Acham, Christine
Author:
Evett, Sophia R.
Author:
Carrington, Andre
Author:
Bayouth, Neiset
Author:
Youmans, William Lafi
Author:
Jennings, John
Author:
Whaley, Deborah Elizabeth
Author:
Gonzand#225
Author:
Gates, Racquel
Author:
Fabian, Ann
Author:
Fuller, Jennifer
Author:
Cooper, Melissa L.
Author:
Yezbick, Daniel F.
Author:
Francis, Consuela
Author:
Johana Londoand#241
Author:
Kenny, Bridget
Author:
Burton, Nsenga
Author:
Heaton, John W.
Author:
Warner, Kristen J.
Author:
Henderson, Geraldine Rosa
Author:
Whaley, Deborah Elizab
Author:
Hakstian, Anne-Marie G.
Author:
Young, Hershini Bhana
Author:
Davis, Blair
Author:
Smith-Shomade, Beretta E.
Author:
Erualdo R. Gonzand#225
Author:
Lewis, Nghana
Author:
Thompson, Azure B.
Author:
Gillam, Reighan
Author:
Wu, Ellen D.
Author:
Whitted, Qiana
Subject:
African American Studies
Subject:
African American Studies-General
Subject:
Ethnic Studies
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Cloth
Series:
Rutgers Studies on Race and Ethnicity
Publication Date:
20130131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
33 photographs
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Media Studies
History and Social Science » African American Studies » General

Watching While Black: Centering the Television of Black Audiences New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$26.25 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Rutgers University Press - English 9780813553863 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by ,

Watching While Black exclusively considers and critically engages programs that Black audiences watch and enjoy. With fresh perspectives, contributors both expose and introduce programming targeted at very specific and under-examined Black demographics. Cutting across forty years of Black television, the book looks at behind-the-scenes practices, significant historical texts, twenty-first century shows, and programs produced for Black audiences around the world.

"Synopsis" by ,
Race and Retail documents the extent to which retail establishments, both past and present, have often catered to specific ethnic and racial groups. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the original essays collected here explore selling and buying practices of nonwhite populations around the world and the barriers that shape these habits, such as racial discrimination, food deserts, and gentrification.
and#160;
and#160;
"Synopsis" by ,
The Blacker the Ink is the first collection to explore not only the diverse range of black characters in comics, but also the multitude of ways that black artists, writers, and publishers have made a mark on the industry. The bookandrsquo;s fifteen original essays take us on a journey that includes familiar milestones like Luke Cage and The Boondocks, while spanning everything from African American newspaper comics of the 1930s to Francophone graphic novels of the 2000s.and#160;
and#160;
"Synopsis" by ,
When many think of comic books the first thing that comes to mind are caped crusaders and spandex-wearing super-heroes. Perhaps, inevitably, these images are of white men (and more rarely, women). It was not until the 1970s that African American superheroes such as Luke Cage, Blade, and others emerged. But as this exciting new collection reveals, these superhero comics are only one small component in a wealth of representations of black characters within comic strips, comic books, and graphic novels over the past century.and#160;
and#160;
The Blacker the Ink is the first book to explore not only the diverse range of black characters in comics, but also the multitude of ways that black artists, writers, and publishers have made a mark on the industry. Organized thematically into andldquo;panelsandrdquo; in tribute to sequential art published in the funny pages of newspapers, the fifteen original essays take us on a journey that reaches from the African American newspaper comics of the 1930s to the Francophone graphic novels of the 2000s. Even as it demonstrates the wide spectrum of images of African Americans in comics and sequential art, the collection also identifies common character types and themes running through everything from the strip The Boondocks to the graphic novel Nat Turner.and#160;
and#160;
Though it does not shy away from examining the legacy of racial stereotypes in comics and racial biases in the industry, The Blacker the Ink also offers inspiring stories of trailblazing African American artists and writers. Whether you are a diehard comic book fan or a casual reader of the funny pages, these essays will give you a new appreciation for how black characters and creators have brought a vibrant splash of color to the world of comics. and#160;

and#160;

and#160;
and#160;

"Synopsis" by ,
Race has long shaped shopping experiences for many Americans. Retail exchanges and establishments have made headlines as flashpoints for conflict not only between blacks and whites, but also between whites, Mexicans, Asian Americans, and a wide variety of other ethnic groups, who have at times found themselves unwelcome at white-owned businesses.and#160;
and#160;
Race and Retail documents the extent to which retail establishments, both past and present, have often catered to specific ethnic and racial groups. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the original essays collected here explore selling and buying practices of nonwhite populations around the world and the barriers that shape these habits, such as racial discrimination, food deserts, and gentrification. The contributors highlight more contemporary issues by raising questions about how race informs business ownersandrsquo; ideas about consumer demand, resulting in substandard quality and higher prices for minorities than in predominantly white neighborhoods. and#160;In a wide-ranging exploration of the subject, they also address revitalization and gentrification in South Korean and Latino neighborhoods in California, Arab and Turkish coffeehouses and hookah lounges in South Paterson, New Jersey, and tourist capoeira consumption in Brazil. and#160;
and#160;
Race and Retail illuminates the complex play of forces at work in racialized retail markets and the everyday impact of those forces on minority consumers. The essays demonstrate how past practice remains in force in subtle and not-so-subtle ways.
and#160;
and#160;

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