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The Federalist

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The Federalist Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Federalist, by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay, constitutes a text central to the American political tradition. Published in newspapers in 1787 and 1788 to explain and promote ratification of the proposed Constitution for the United States, which up to then were bound by the Articles of Confederation, The Federalist remains today of singular importance to students of liberty around the world.

The new Liberty Fund edition presents the text of the Gideon edition of The Federalist, published in 1818, which includes the preface to the text by Jacob Gideon as well as the responses and corrections prepared by Madison to the McLean edition of 1810. The McLean edition had presented the Federalist texts as corrected by Hamilton and Jay but not reviewed by Madison.

The Liberty Fund Federalist also includes a new introduction, a Readers Guide outlining—section by section—the arguments of The Federalist, a glossary, and ten appendixes, including the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, the Virginia Resolution Proposing the Annapolis Convention, and other key documents leading up to the transmission of the Constitution to the governors of the several states. Finally, the Constitution of the United States and Amendments is given, with marginal cross-references to the pertinent passages in The Federalist that address, argue for, or comment upon the specific term, phrase, section, or article of the Constitution.

Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804) was secretary and aide-de-camp to Washington in 1777-81, a member of the Continental Congress in 1782-83 and 1787-88, a representative from New York to the Annapolis Convention in 1786 and to the Constitutional Convention in 1787, first U. S. secretary of the treasury in 1789-95, and inspector general of the army, with the rank of major general, from 1798 to 1800. His efforts to defeat Aaron Burr for the presidency in 1800-01 and for the governorship of New York in 1804 led to his fatal duel with Burr.

John Jay (1745-1829) was a member of the Continental Congress in 1774 through 1779 and its president in 1778-79, drafter of New Yorks first constitution in 1777, chief justice of the New York supreme court from 1777 to 1778, U. S. minister to Spain in 1779, a member of the commission to negotiate peace with Great Britain in Paris in 1787, U. S. secretary of foreign affairs from 1784 to 1789, Chief Justice of the United States from 1789 to 1795, and governor of New York from 1795 to 1801.

James Madison (1751-1836) was a member of the Virginia legislature in 1776-80 and 1784-86, of the Continental Congress in 1780-83, and of the Constitutional Convention in 1787, where he earned the title “father of the U. S. Constitution.” He was a member of the U. S. House of Representatives from 1789 to 1797, where he was a sponsor of the Bill of Rights and an opponent of Hamiltons financial measures. He was the author of the Virginia Resolutions of 1798 in opposition to the U. S. alien and sedition laws. He was U. S. secretary of state in 1801-09, President of the U. S. in 1809-17, and rector of the University of Virginia, 1826-36.

George W. Carey is a professor of government at Georgetown University and the editor of several works on American government. He is the author of In Defense of the Constitution, published by Liberty Fund.

James McClellan (1937-2005) was James Bryce Visiting Fellow in American Studies at the Institute of United States Studies, University of London, and the author of Liberty, Order, and Justic

Synopsis:

Written and published in newspapers in 1787 and 1788 to explain and promote ratification of the proposed Constitution for the United States. which were then bound by the Articles of Confederation, The Federalist remains of singular importance to students of liberty around the world. Liberty Fund presents the Gideon Edition of The Federalist, published in 1818, which includes the responses prepared by Madison to the previously published McLean edition of 1810, which presented The Federalist texts as corrected by Hamilton, but not by Madison. The Liberty Fund edition also includes a new introduction, notes to The Federalist, a glossary, and the entirety of the Articles of Confederation, the Declaration of Independence, and the United States Constitution. Adjoining the text of the Constitution are cross-references linking provisions of the Constitution to the pertinent passages in The Federalist that address the specific term, phrase, section, or article within the Constitution.

Table of Contents

Editors ’ Introduction xvii Reader ’s Guide to The Federalist lvii Preface to the Gideon Edition lxxxv The Federalist No.1 Introduction 1

No.2 Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force & Influence 5

No.3 The same Subject continued 9

No.4 The same Subject continued 13

No.5 The same Subject continued 17

No.6 Concerning Dangers from War between the States 20

No.7 The subject continued, and Particular Causes Enumerated 26

No.8 The effects of Internal War in producing Standing Armies, and other institutions unfriendly to liberty 32

No.9 The Utility of the Union as a Safeguard against Domestic Faction and Insurrection 37

No.10 The same Subject continued 42

No.11 The Utility of the Union in respect to Commerce and a Navy 49

No.12 The Utility of the Union in respect to Revenue 55

No.13 The same Subject continued, with a view to Economy 60

No.14 An Objection drawn from the Extent of Country, Answered 62

No.15 Concerning the Defects of the Present Confederation, in Relation to the Principle of Legislation for the States in their Collective

Capacities 68

No.16 The same Subject continued, in relation to the same Principles 75

No.17 The Subject continued, and Illustrated by Examples, to show the tendency of Federal Governments, rather to Anarchy among the

Members, than Tyranny in the Head 80

No.18 The Subject continued, with further Examples 84

No.19 The Subject continued, with further Examples 90

No.20 The Subject continued, with further Examples 95

No.21 Further defects of the present Constitution 99

No.22 The same subject continued, and concluded 104

No.23 The necessity of a government, at least equally energetic with the one proposed 112

No.24 The subject continued, with an answer to an objection concerning standing armies 117

No.25 The subject continued, with the same view 122

No.26 The subject continued, with the same view 126

No.27 The subject continued, with the same view 132

No.28 The same subject continued 136

No.29 Concerning the militia 140

No.30 Concerning taxation 145

No.31 The same subject continued 150

No.32 The same subject continued 154

No.33 The same subject continued 158

No.34 The same subject continued 162

No.35 The same subject continued 167

No.36 The same subject continued 172

No.37 Concerning the difficulties which the convention must have experienced in the formation of a proper plan 179

No.38 The subject continued, and the incoherence of the objections to the plan, exposed 186

No.39 The conformity of the plan to republican principles: an objection in respect to the powers of the convention, examined 193

No.40 The same objection further examined 199

No.41 General view of the powers proposed to be vested in the union 207

No.42 The same view continued 215

No.43 The same view continued 222

No.44 The same view continued and concluded 230

No.45 A further discussion of the supposed danger from the powers of the union, to the state governments 237

No.46 The subject of the last paper resumed; with an examination of the comparative means of influence of the federal and state governments

242

No.47 The meaning of the maxim, which requires a separation of the departments of power, examined and ascertained 249

No.48 The same subject continued, with a view to the means of giving efficacy in practice to that maxim 256

No.49 The same subject continued, with the same view 260

No.50 The same subject continued, with the same view 264

No.51 The same subject continued, with the same view, and concluded 267

No.52 Concerning the house of representatives, with a view to the qualifications of the electors and elected, and the time of service of the

members 272

No.53 The same subject continued, with a view of the term of service of the members 276

No.54 The same subject continued, with a view to the ratio of representation 282

No.55 The same subject continued, in relation to the total number of the body 286

No.56 The subject continued, in relation to the same point 291

No.57 The same subject continued, in relation to the supposed tendency of the plan of the convention to elevate the few above the many 295

No.58 The same subject continued, in relation to the future augmentation of the members 300

No.59 Concerning the regulation of elections 305

No.60 The same subject continued 310

No.61 The same subject continued, and concluded 315

No.62 Concerning the constitution of the senate, with regard to the qualifications of the members; the manner of appointing them; the equality

of representation; the number of the senators, and the duration of their appointments 319

No.63 A further view of the constitution of the senate, in regard to the duration of the appointment of its members 325

No.64 A further view of the constitution of the senate, in regard to the power of making treaties 332

No.65 A further view of the constitution of the senate, in relation to its capacity, as a court for the trial of impeachments 337

No.66 The same subject continued 342

No.67 Concerning the constitution of the president: a gross attempt to misrepresent this part of the plan detected 347

No.68 The view of the constitution of the president continued, in relation to the mode of appointment 351

No.69 The same view continued, with a comparison between the president and the king of Great Britain, on the one hand, and the governor of

New York, on the other 355

No.70 The same view continued, in relation to the unity of the executive, and with an examination of the project of an executive council 362

No.71 The same view continued, in regard to the duration of the office 369

No.72 The same view continued, in regard to the re-eligibility of the president 374

No.73 The same view continued, in relation to the provision concerning support, and the power of the negative 379

No.74 The same view continued, in relation to the command of the national forces, and the power of pardoning 384

No.75 The same view continued, in relation to the power of making treaties 387

No.76 The same view continued, in relation to the appointment of the officers of the government 391

No.77 The view of the constitution oft he president concluded, with a further consideration of the power of appointment, and a concise

examination of his remaining powers 396

No.78 A view of the constitution of the judicial department in relation to the tenure of good behaviour 401

No.79 A further view of the judicial department, in relation to the provisions for the support and responsibility of the judges 408

No.80 A further view of the judicial department, in relation to the extent of its powers 411

No.81 A further view of the judicial department, in relation to the distribution of its authority 417

No.82 A further view of the judicial department, in reference to some miscellaneous questions 426

No.83 A further view of the judicial department, in relation to the trial by jury 430

No.84 Concerning several miscellaneous objections 442

No.85 Conclusion 452 Glossary 459

Appendixes

1.The Declaration of Independence 495

2.Articles of Confederation 500

3.Virginia Resolution Proposing the Annapolis Convention 510

4.Proceedings of the Annapolis Convention 511

5.Virginia Resolution Providing Delegates to the Federal Convention of 1787 516

6.Call by the Continental Congress for the Federal Convention of 1787 518

7.Resolution of the Federal Convention Submitting the Constitution to the Continental Congress 520

8.Washington ’s Letter of Transmittal to the President of the Continental Congress 522

9.Resolution of the Continental Congress Submitting the Constitution to the Several States 524

10.Letter of the Secretary of the Continental Congress Transmitting Copy of the Constitution to the Several Governors 525

The Constitution of the United States (cross-referenced with The Federalist )and Amendments 526 Index 553

Product Details

ISBN:
9780865972896
Author:
Hamilton, Alexander (edt)
Publisher:
Liberty Fund
Author:
Carey, George
Author:
McClellan, James
Location:
Indianapolis, Ind.
Subject:
Constitutional history
Subject:
Constitutional law
Subject:
United States / Revolutionary Period (1775-1800)
Subject:
Law | Constitutional Law
Copyright:
Edition Description:
New Edition
Series Volume:
RN-527
Publication Date:
20010731
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
652
Dimensions:
9 x 6 in
Age Level:
from 18 up to 100

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Law » Constitutional Law
History and Social Science » US History » Documents
History and Social Science » US History » Federalist Papers
History and Social Science » US History » Revolution and Constitution Era
History and Social Science » World History » General
Humanities » Philosophy » General

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Product details 652 pages Liberty Fund - English 9780865972896 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Written and published in newspapers in 1787 and 1788 to explain and promote ratification of the proposed Constitution for the United States. which were then bound by the Articles of Confederation, The Federalist remains of singular importance to students of liberty around the world. Liberty Fund presents the Gideon Edition of The Federalist, published in 1818, which includes the responses prepared by Madison to the previously published McLean edition of 1810, which presented The Federalist texts as corrected by Hamilton, but not by Madison. The Liberty Fund edition also includes a new introduction, notes to The Federalist, a glossary, and the entirety of the Articles of Confederation, the Declaration of Independence, and the United States Constitution. Adjoining the text of the Constitution are cross-references linking provisions of the Constitution to the pertinent passages in The Federalist that address the specific term, phrase, section, or article within the Constitution.
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