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My first novel, Love Me Back, was published on September 16. Writing the book took seven years, and along the way three chapters were published in... Continue »
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Baby Geisha

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Baby Geisha Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Baby Geisha is a collection of thirteen sexually-charged stories that roam from the Coney Island Ferris wheel to the Greek Isles.

True to Trinie Dalton's form, the stories in Baby Geisha are distinctly imagined while also representing a more grounded approach in the author's style. There's the Joan Didion-obsessed starving journalist of "Pura Vida," struggling to maintain a relationship with her performance artist sisters (or anyone, for that matter), on assignment in Costa Rica to write an article on sloth-hugging. "Millennium Chill" is about a woman who discovers that her body heat is mysteriously linked to that of an elderly beggar.

The story "War Foods" begins with these memorable lines: "'Let's go downtown and get some government cheese,' my father used to say to my brother and I. He thought that was entertainment enough for the weekends he had us in his custody."

Baby Geisha serves to support Dalton's reputation as a remarkable stylist and a very original artist.

Trinie Dalton has authored and edited five books. Wide Eyed, Sweet Tomb, and A Unicorn Is Born are works of fiction. Dear New Girl or Whatever Your Name Is and Mythtym are art compilations. She writes articles and reviews about books, art, and music. She teaches book arts and writing at Pratt and New York University, and is on the MFA fiction faculty at Vermont College of Fine Arts.

Review:

"Dalton (Wide Eyed) compiles whimsies of varied quality in this new collection of short prose. In the parable-like 'Millennium Chill,' a 'mother-aged' woman who can't find warmth in her new home is visited by a beggar who has memorized her possessions and requests bits of charity: a television set, green galoshes, her cat, her hands, and the 'several hundred sweaters' that 'cascaded down everything.' In 'The Sad Drag Monologues,' in which clownish photographs festoon each piece, narrator Koshare Wildcat declares, 'I don't want to make characters, I want to speak directly to you.... What I care about is the message....' Aptly named narrator Too Cute concurs: 'But to turn this into a real story with real characters would be to macerate the metaphor.' Maybe that's why the monologues work better as creative essays, leaving the book's few traditionally crafted fictions to lasso the powers of the short story form. Though Dalton writes in the minimalist vein, alongside the likes of Lydia Davis, Ben Marcus, and Gary Lutz, her peculiar fascinations give her a singular voice. Not every piece pays off, but on the whole it's a pleasurable trip." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

"If fiction were a giant transporter, I'd want to go to Trinie Dalton's world."Los Angeles Times on Wide Eyed

Review:

"Half ingenuous and half wily, winningly hard to pin down. The result is a kind of everyday fantastic. Dalton nails the Walserian trick of evincing a sincerity nearly indistinguishable from irony. The effect is a poised instability, more uncanny than the magic the stories sometimes describe."Bookforum

Review:

"Trinie Daltons Baby Geisha is a travelogue. Her stories speak volumes of lostness about a world full of riveting features and no map. Things just kind of dead-end in a macho way that feels like porn that didnt happen — the dirty scene I mean. Trinie's writing absolutely unfeminine work. Which feels unique to me. In her hands, gender, like a new kind of western, is just moving across a landscape, the salutary effect of which is that it requires that Trinie write this beautiful stuff of which I cant get enough. Like a desert, her work refuses to give us even a drop more, is full of strange animals, is enduring and glittery." Eileen Myles

Review:

"'Pura Vida, ' about an emotionally unavailable journalist on assignment to cover a sloth clinic in Costa Rica, is a standout, its final moment between woman and sloth arriving with breathtaking lightness, like the first flower of spring. Other memorable outings include trips to the Missouri Ozarks (Wet Look), the Alps (Shrub of Emotion), and the Painted Desert (Baby Geisha), with men and women on the verge of, but never quite reaching, psycho-sexual breakthroughs."Los Angeles Magazine Critic's Pick

Review:

"Dalton handles her narratives with a deft skill and a keen, distinct, confident voice that never eases up, never ceases to surprise, leaving readers happy to experience her intriguing world up close. Just the way we like it."Brooklyn Rail

Review:

"[The stories] feel like brilliant sexual fairy tales on drugs. Dalton writes of self-discovery and sex with a knowing humility and humor." Interview Magazine

Synopsis:

Eye-popping stories that showcase an assured and exceptionally stylish talent.

Synopsis:

"Half ingenuous and half wily, winningly hard to pin down. The result is a kind of everyday fantastic. Dalton nails the Walserian trick of evincing a sincerity nearly indistinguishable from irony. The effect is a poised instability, more uncanny than the magic the stories sometimes describe."

-Bookforum

"Dalton handles her narratives with a deft skill and a keen, distinct, confident voice that never eases up, never ceases to surprise, leaving readers happy to experience her intriguing world up close. Just the way we like it."

-Brooklyn Rail

"[The stories] feel like brilliant sexual fairy tales on drugs. Dalton writes of self-discovery and sex with a knowing humility and humor."

-Interview Magazine

"'Pura Vida,' about an emotionally unavailable journalist on assignment to cover a sloth clinic in Costa Rica, is a standout, its final moment between woman and sloth arriving with breathtaking lightness, like the first flower of spring. Other memorable outings include trips to the Missouri Ozarks ("Wet Look"), the Alps ("Shrub of Emotion"), and the Painted Desert ("Baby Geisha"), with men and women on the verge of, but never quite reaching, psycho-sexual breakthroughs."

-Los Angeles Magazine Critic's Pick

"[Baby Geisha] pokes fun, it's satirical, there's an underlying delicious irony to it, and the telling parts are the ones where Dalton coins names, cuts down trees with her paragraphs, gives us just a touch of the absurd... Dalton's skill as a writer, and above all her expertise in choosing words that play into a darker cultural picture--an offsetting of America's natural high!--are not to be missed here."

-Fanzine

Baby Geisha is a collection of thirteen sexually-charged stories that roam from the Coney Island Ferris wheel to the Greek Isles.

True to Trinie Dalton's form, the stories in Baby Geisha are distinctly imagined while also representing a more grounded approach in the author's style. There's the Joan Didion-obsessed starving journalist of "Pura Vida," struggling to maintain a relationship with her performance artist sisters (or anyone, for that matter), on assignment in Costa Rica to write an article on sloth-hugging. "Millennium Chill" is about a woman who discovers that her body heat is mysteriously linked to that of an elderly beggar.

Baby Geisha serves to support Dalton's reputation as a remarkable stylist and a very original artist.

About the Author

Trinie Dalton has authored and/or edited five books. Wide Eyed (Akashic), Sweet Tomb (Madras Press), and A Unicorn Is Born (Abrams) are works of fiction. Dear New Girl or Whatever Your Name Is (McSweeneys) and Mythtym (Picturebox) are art compilations. She written articles for venues such as Bookforum, Paper, Purple, Arthur, The Believer, and Bomb. She teaches book/arts and writing at Pratt and NYU, and is on the MFA Fiction faculty at Vermont College of Fine Arts.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780983247104
Author:
Dalton, Trinie
Publisher:
Two Dollar Radio
Author:
Dalton, Trinie
Subject:
Stories (single author)
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback, Deckle Edge
Publication Date:
20120131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
162
Dimensions:
7.5 x 5.5 in

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Baby Geisha New Trade Paper
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Product details 162 pages Two Dollar Radio - English 9780983247104 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Dalton (Wide Eyed) compiles whimsies of varied quality in this new collection of short prose. In the parable-like 'Millennium Chill,' a 'mother-aged' woman who can't find warmth in her new home is visited by a beggar who has memorized her possessions and requests bits of charity: a television set, green galoshes, her cat, her hands, and the 'several hundred sweaters' that 'cascaded down everything.' In 'The Sad Drag Monologues,' in which clownish photographs festoon each piece, narrator Koshare Wildcat declares, 'I don't want to make characters, I want to speak directly to you.... What I care about is the message....' Aptly named narrator Too Cute concurs: 'But to turn this into a real story with real characters would be to macerate the metaphor.' Maybe that's why the monologues work better as creative essays, leaving the book's few traditionally crafted fictions to lasso the powers of the short story form. Though Dalton writes in the minimalist vein, alongside the likes of Lydia Davis, Ben Marcus, and Gary Lutz, her peculiar fascinations give her a singular voice. Not every piece pays off, but on the whole it's a pleasurable trip." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , "If fiction were a giant transporter, I'd want to go to Trinie Dalton's world."Los Angeles Times on
"Review" by , "Half ingenuous and half wily, winningly hard to pin down. The result is a kind of everyday fantastic. Dalton nails the Walserian trick of evincing a sincerity nearly indistinguishable from irony. The effect is a poised instability, more uncanny than the magic the stories sometimes describe."
"Review" by , "Trinie Daltons Baby Geisha is a travelogue. Her stories speak volumes of lostness about a world full of riveting features and no map. Things just kind of dead-end in a macho way that feels like porn that didnt happen — the dirty scene I mean. Trinie's writing absolutely unfeminine work. Which feels unique to me. In her hands, gender, like a new kind of western, is just moving across a landscape, the salutary effect of which is that it requires that Trinie write this beautiful stuff of which I cant get enough. Like a desert, her work refuses to give us even a drop more, is full of strange animals, is enduring and glittery."
"Review" by , "'Pura Vida, ' about an emotionally unavailable journalist on assignment to cover a sloth clinic in Costa Rica, is a standout, its final moment between woman and sloth arriving with breathtaking lightness, like the first flower of spring. Other memorable outings include trips to the Missouri Ozarks (Wet Look), the Alps (Shrub of Emotion), and the Painted Desert (Baby Geisha), with men and women on the verge of, but never quite reaching, psycho-sexual breakthroughs."
"Review" by , "Dalton handles her narratives with a deft skill and a keen, distinct, confident voice that never eases up, never ceases to surprise, leaving readers happy to experience her intriguing world up close. Just the way we like it."
"Review" by , "[The stories] feel like brilliant sexual fairy tales on drugs. Dalton writes of self-discovery and sex with a knowing humility and humor."
"Synopsis" by , Eye-popping stories that showcase an assured and exceptionally stylish talent.
"Synopsis" by ,

"Half ingenuous and half wily, winningly hard to pin down. The result is a kind of everyday fantastic. Dalton nails the Walserian trick of evincing a sincerity nearly indistinguishable from irony. The effect is a poised instability, more uncanny than the magic the stories sometimes describe."

-Bookforum

"Dalton handles her narratives with a deft skill and a keen, distinct, confident voice that never eases up, never ceases to surprise, leaving readers happy to experience her intriguing world up close. Just the way we like it."

-Brooklyn Rail

"[The stories] feel like brilliant sexual fairy tales on drugs. Dalton writes of self-discovery and sex with a knowing humility and humor."

-Interview Magazine

"'Pura Vida,' about an emotionally unavailable journalist on assignment to cover a sloth clinic in Costa Rica, is a standout, its final moment between woman and sloth arriving with breathtaking lightness, like the first flower of spring. Other memorable outings include trips to the Missouri Ozarks ("Wet Look"), the Alps ("Shrub of Emotion"), and the Painted Desert ("Baby Geisha"), with men and women on the verge of, but never quite reaching, psycho-sexual breakthroughs."

-Los Angeles Magazine Critic's Pick

"[Baby Geisha] pokes fun, it's satirical, there's an underlying delicious irony to it, and the telling parts are the ones where Dalton coins names, cuts down trees with her paragraphs, gives us just a touch of the absurd... Dalton's skill as a writer, and above all her expertise in choosing words that play into a darker cultural picture--an offsetting of America's natural high!--are not to be missed here."

-Fanzine

Baby Geisha is a collection of thirteen sexually-charged stories that roam from the Coney Island Ferris wheel to the Greek Isles.

True to Trinie Dalton's form, the stories in Baby Geisha are distinctly imagined while also representing a more grounded approach in the author's style. There's the Joan Didion-obsessed starving journalist of "Pura Vida," struggling to maintain a relationship with her performance artist sisters (or anyone, for that matter), on assignment in Costa Rica to write an article on sloth-hugging. "Millennium Chill" is about a woman who discovers that her body heat is mysteriously linked to that of an elderly beggar.

Baby Geisha serves to support Dalton's reputation as a remarkable stylist and a very original artist.

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