Star Wars Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN!

Weekly drawing for $100 credit. Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

More at Powell's


Recently Viewed clear list


The Powell's Playlist | June 18, 2014

Daniel H. Wilson: IMG The Powell’s Playlist: Daniel H. Wilson



Like many writers, I'm constantly haunting coffee shops with a laptop out and my headphones on. I listen to a lot of music while I write, and songs... Continue »
  1. $18.87 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    Robogenesis

    Daniel H. Wilson 9780385537094

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$26.99
New Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
8 Local Warehouse Nature Studies- General
8 Remote Warehouse Nature Studies- General

More copies of this ISBN

This title in other editions

Bug Music: How Insects Gave Us Rhythm and Noise

by

Bug Music: How Insects Gave Us Rhythm and Noise Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In the spring of 2013 the cicadas in the Northeastern United States will yet again emerge from their seventeen-year cycle — the longest gestation period of any animal. Those who experience this great sonic invasion compare their sense of wonder to the arrival of a comet or a solar eclipse. This unending rhythmic cycle is just one unique example of how the pulse and noise of insects has taught humans the meaning of rhythm, from the whirr of a crickets wings to this unfathomable and exact seventeen-year beat.

In listening to cicadas, as well as other humming, clicking, and thrumming insects, Bug Music is the first book to consider the radical notion that we humans got our idea of rhythm, synchronization, and dance from the world of insect sounds that surrounded our species over the millions of years over which we evolved. Completing the trilogy he began with Why Birds Sing and Thousand Mile Song, David Rothenberg explores a unique part of our relationship with nature and sound — the music of insects that has provided a soundtrack for humanity throughout the history of our species. Bug Music continues Rothenberg's in-depth research and spirited writing on the relationship between human and animal music, and it follows him as he explores insect influences in classical and modern music, plays his saxophone with crickets and other insects, and confers with researchers and scientists nationwide.

This engaging and thought-provoking book challenges our understanding of our place in nature and our relationship to the creatures surrounding us, and makes a passionate case for the interconnectedness of species.

Review:

"Following books about bird music (Why Birds Sing) and whale music (Thousand Mile Song), Rothenberg, a jazz musician and professor of philosophy and music at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, proposes that the 'wild percussion sounds' of insects were humans' original musical inspiration, the source of our interest in 'the trill, the thrum, the resonant, the mangled, the mashed.' Rothenberg researches and visits with scientists and musicians preoccupied with bug music, and intersperses stories of his musical adventures, philosophical musings, and charts of bug buzz patterns with poetry from the five-volume set of singing-insect literary references gathered by Montreal entomologist Keith Kevan. Most importantly, Rothenberg listens deeply to the insects and muses on what we need to know 'to be musically attuned to and influenced by these six-legged singers.' The book's climax is a concert where he collaborates with members of Brood XIX, 'the largest of the thirteen-year cicada populations,' which emerged in 2011. Despite occasional exuberant incoherence, Rothenberg raises thoughtful questions about the nature of music and our ability to communicate with other species. The author's wide-ranging musical interests — from Renaissance madrigals and John Cage to electronica and katydids — together with his playful, almost romantic approach to the subject helps engage general readers, balancing the book's more technical material. 56 b&w photos and illus. Agent: Michelle Rubin, Writer's House." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Review:

"Bug Music is a cool groove of biology, music, and human culture from an interspecies musician and scholar fully in tune with nature. It is engaging, wide-ranging, and profound in suggesting that the thrum of insects is a primordial musical beat. This book is for everyone who has ever marveled at nature or delighted in the sounds of her insect choirs, and especially for those who have done neither." John Marzluff, author of Dog Days, Raven Nights and Gifts of the Crow

Synopsis:

Bug Music explores the musicality of insects and their role in teaching humanity to follow the beat.

In the spring of 2013 the cicadas will return on their seventeen year cycle — the longest gestation period of any animal. Their deafening sound upon their arrival is familiar to most Americans. Cicadas are famous throughout the world for the "song" — created by the males, and distinctive to each species. When they arrive, cicadas become the backbeat of summer — they like heat and do their most spirited singing during the hotter hours of a summer day. They are one unique example of how the rhythm of insects taught humans the meaning of rhythm, from the whirr of a crickets wings to this long, unfathomable, exact seventeen year beat.

In looking at cicadas, as well as other humming, clicking, and thrumming insects, Bug Music is the first book to consider the radical notion that we humans got our idea of rhythm, synchronization, and dance from the world of insect sounds that surrounded our species over the millions of years over which we evolved. Rothenberg explores a unique part of our relationship with nature and sound — the music of insects that has provided a soundtrack for humanity throughout the history of our species. This book continues Rothenberg's research and writing on the relationship between human and animal music, and it follows him as he explores the exotic insect markets in Shanghai, plays his saxophone with crickets and other insects, and confers with researchers and scientists nationwide.

About the Author

Philosopher and jazz musician David Rothenberg is professor of philosophy and music at the New Jersey Institute of Technology and the author of Survival of the Beautiful, Why Birds Sing, and Thousand Mile Song. He lives in the Hudson Valley, New York.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781250005212
Subtitle:
How Insects Gave Us Rhythm and Noise
Author:
Rothenberg, David
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Subject:
Insects & Spiders
Subject:
Social
Subject:
Nature Studies-General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20130416
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in

Other books you might like

  1. The Anarchist New Trade Paper $13.95
  2. Truth's Ragged Edge: The Rise of the... Used Trade Paper $10.95

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Music » History and Criticism
Children's » General
Featured Titles » Science
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics
History and Social Science » World History » General
Humanities » Philosophy » Social
Reference » Science Reference » General
Science and Mathematics » Biology » Entomology and General Invertebrates
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » General
Science and Mathematics » Nature Studies » Insects » Entomology
Science and Mathematics » Physics » Acoustics

Bug Music: How Insects Gave Us Rhythm and Noise New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$26.99 In Stock
Product details 288 pages St. Martin's Press - English 9781250005212 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Following books about bird music (Why Birds Sing) and whale music (Thousand Mile Song), Rothenberg, a jazz musician and professor of philosophy and music at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, proposes that the 'wild percussion sounds' of insects were humans' original musical inspiration, the source of our interest in 'the trill, the thrum, the resonant, the mangled, the mashed.' Rothenberg researches and visits with scientists and musicians preoccupied with bug music, and intersperses stories of his musical adventures, philosophical musings, and charts of bug buzz patterns with poetry from the five-volume set of singing-insect literary references gathered by Montreal entomologist Keith Kevan. Most importantly, Rothenberg listens deeply to the insects and muses on what we need to know 'to be musically attuned to and influenced by these six-legged singers.' The book's climax is a concert where he collaborates with members of Brood XIX, 'the largest of the thirteen-year cicada populations,' which emerged in 2011. Despite occasional exuberant incoherence, Rothenberg raises thoughtful questions about the nature of music and our ability to communicate with other species. The author's wide-ranging musical interests — from Renaissance madrigals and John Cage to electronica and katydids — together with his playful, almost romantic approach to the subject helps engage general readers, balancing the book's more technical material. 56 b&w photos and illus. Agent: Michelle Rubin, Writer's House." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Review" by , "Bug Music is a cool groove of biology, music, and human culture from an interspecies musician and scholar fully in tune with nature. It is engaging, wide-ranging, and profound in suggesting that the thrum of insects is a primordial musical beat. This book is for everyone who has ever marveled at nature or delighted in the sounds of her insect choirs, and especially for those who have done neither."
"Synopsis" by , Bug Music explores the musicality of insects and their role in teaching humanity to follow the beat.

In the spring of 2013 the cicadas will return on their seventeen year cycle — the longest gestation period of any animal. Their deafening sound upon their arrival is familiar to most Americans. Cicadas are famous throughout the world for the "song" — created by the males, and distinctive to each species. When they arrive, cicadas become the backbeat of summer — they like heat and do their most spirited singing during the hotter hours of a summer day. They are one unique example of how the rhythm of insects taught humans the meaning of rhythm, from the whirr of a crickets wings to this long, unfathomable, exact seventeen year beat.

In looking at cicadas, as well as other humming, clicking, and thrumming insects, Bug Music is the first book to consider the radical notion that we humans got our idea of rhythm, synchronization, and dance from the world of insect sounds that surrounded our species over the millions of years over which we evolved. Rothenberg explores a unique part of our relationship with nature and sound — the music of insects that has provided a soundtrack for humanity throughout the history of our species. This book continues Rothenberg's research and writing on the relationship between human and animal music, and it follows him as he explores the exotic insect markets in Shanghai, plays his saxophone with crickets and other insects, and confers with researchers and scientists nationwide.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.