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Midstream: An Unfinished Memoir

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Midstream: An Unfinished Memoir Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Bandgt;The final book from Reynolds Price, and#8220;one of the most important voices in modern Southern fictionand#8221; (andlt;Iandgt;The New York Timesandlt;/Iandgt;)and#8212;with a foreword by Anne Tyler and an afterwordby William Priceandlt;/Bandgt; andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;WHEN REYNOLDS PRICE DIED IN JANUARY 2011, he left behind one final piece of writingand#8212;two hundred candid, heartrending, and marvelously written manuscript pages about a critical period in his young adulthood. Picking up where his previous memoir, andlt;Iandgt;Ardent Spirits, andlt;/Iandgt;left off, the work documents a brief time from 1961 to 1965, perhaps the most leisurely of Priceand#8217;s life, but also one of enormous challenge and growth. Price gave it the title andlt;Iandgt;Midstreamandlt;/Iandgt;. Approaching thirty, Price writes, is to face the notion that and#8220;andlt;Iandgt;This is it. Iand#8217;m now the person Iand#8217;m likely to be . . . from here to the end.andlt;/Iandgt;and#8221; andlt;Iandgt;Midstream, andlt;/Iandgt;which begins when Price is twenty-eight, details the final youthful adventures of a man on the cusp of artistic acclaim. Here, Price chases a love to England, only to meet heartbreak. Determined to pursue other pleasures, he travels to Sweden for a friendand#8217;s wedding, then journeys to Rome with British poet Stephen Spender and spends an afternoon with Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor. Price returns to the United States, where he finds company with a group of artists as he awaits the 1962 publication of his first novel, andlt;Iandgt;A Long and Happy Lifeandlt;/Iandgt;. andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;and#8220;Few writers have made as dramatic an entrance on the American literary stage,and#8221; declared andlt;Iandgt;The New York Times andlt;/Iandgt;on the bookand#8217;s success. Price would settle into a tranquil life in North Carolina, buy a house, and resume teaching. Concluding with his motherand#8217;s death and Priceand#8217;s new endeavorsand#8212;a second novel and foray into Hollywood screenwritingand#8212;andlt;Iandgt;Midstream andlt;/Iandgt;offers a poignant portrait of a man at the threshold of true adulthood, navigating new responsibilities and pleasures alike. It is a fitting bookend for Priceand#8217;s remarkable career, and it reinforces his place in the pantheon of American literature. andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;andlt;Bandgt;***andlt;/Bandgt;andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;andlt;Bandgt;andlt;/Bandgt;andnbsp;andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;andlt;Bandgt;FROM ANNE TYLERand#8217;S FOREWORD TO andlt;Iandgt;MIDSTREAM andlt;/Iandgt;andlt;/Bandgt;andlt;BRandgt;andlt;BRandgt;andlt;Iandgt;and#8220;Just look at him flying across the campus, curls bouncing, dark eyes flashing, and a black cape (I swear it) flaring out behind him. Actually he never owned a black cape; he told me that, years later. He said it was a navy jacket, just tossed over his shoulders. But still, he was wearing a andlt;/Iandgt;virtual andlt;Iandgt;cape, if you know what I mean. He was an exclamation point in a landscape of mostly declarative sentences. He lived in a house-trailer out in the woods; he invited us to come there and drink smoky-tasting tea in handmade mugs. Speaking with a trace of an English accent from his recent studies at Oxford (for he had a genius for unintentional mimicry, which he said could become a curse in certain situations), he told us funny, affectionate tales about his childhood in backwater Macon. Most of us came from Macons of our own; we were astonished to hear that they were fit subjects for storytelling. All over again, inspiration hit. Let us out of there! We had to get back to our rooms and start writing.and#8221;andlt;/Iandgt;

Review:

"Price died of a heart attack before he could complete his memoir, the fourth in a series of autobiographical volumes. A prolific writer and academic, he spent more than five decades teaching at Duke University, his alma mater. The book begins in 1961 as Price, not even 30-years-old, returns to Oxford following his first three years teaching at Duke. His first novel, A Long and Happy Life, is about to be published in the U.S. to considerable praise, setting the writer on the road to literary renown. The book is full of anecdotes about famous figures, including philosopher/author Iris Murdoch, actress Natalie Wood, W.H. Auden, William Faulkner, and even Ronald Reagan, but the most scintillating scene finds the author lunching with mega-couple Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor in Rome while they're filming Cleopatra. However, the essence of the writer himself disappears behind these mildly amusing stories. The most poignant pages come when he recounts his mother's death: 'Despite the fact that I'd loved her unquestionably more, and longer, than anyone else in my life, I'd just instructed the doctor...to permit this body that had made my body more than thirty years ago, and had since dealt with me in boundless generosity, to rush ahead and die.' Had Price been able to complete his memoir, perhaps the message would be clear, but as it is, the reader is left wondering why he was writing it at all. Photos. "
Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

The final book from Reynolds Price, “one of the most important voices in modern Southern fiction” (The New York Times)—with a foreword by Anne Tyler and an afterwordby William Price

WHEN REYNOLDS PRICE DIED IN JANUARY 2011, he left behind one final piece of writing—two hundred candid, heartrending, and marvelously written manuscript pages about a critical period in his young adulthood. Picking up where his previous memoir, Ardent Spirits, left off, the work documents a brief time from 1961 to 1965, perhaps the most leisurely of Price’s life, but also one of enormous challenge and growth. Price gave it the title Midstream. Approaching thirty, Price writes, is to face the notion that “This is it. I’m now the person I’m likely to be . . . from here to the end.Midstream, which begins when Price is twenty-eight, details the final youthful adventures of a man on the cusp of artistic acclaim. Here, Price chases a love to England, only to meet heartbreak. Determined to pursue other pleasures, he travels to Sweden for a friend’s wedding, then journeys to Rome with British poet Stephen Spender and spends an afternoon with Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor. Price returns to the United States, where he finds company with a group of artists as he awaits the 1962 publication of his first novel, A Long and Happy Life.

“Few writers have made as dramatic an entrance on the American literary stage,” declared The New York Times on the book’s success. Price would settle into a tranquil life in North Carolina, buy a house, and resume teaching. Concluding with his mother’s death and Price’s new endeavors—a second novel and foray into Hollywood screenwriting—Midstream offers a poignant portrait of a man at the threshold of true adulthood, navigating new responsibilities and pleasures alike. It is a fitting bookend for Price’s remarkable career, and it reinforces his place in the pantheon of American literature.

***

 

FROM ANNE TYLER’S FOREWORD TO MIDSTREAM

“Just look at him flying across the campus, curls bouncing, dark eyes flashing, and a black cape (I swear it) flaring out behind him. Actually he never owned a black cape; he told me that, years later. He said it was a navy jacket, just tossed over his shoulders. But still, he was wearing a virtual cape, if you know what I mean. He was an exclamation point in a landscape of mostly declarative sentences. He lived in a house-trailer out in the woods; he invited us to come there and drink smoky-tasting tea in handmade mugs. Speaking with a trace of an English accent from his recent studies at Oxford (for he had a genius for unintentional mimicry, which he said could become a curse in certain situations), he told us funny, affectionate tales about his childhood in backwater Macon. Most of us came from Macons of our own; we were astonished to hear that they were fit subjects for storytelling. All over again, inspiration hit. Let us out of there! We had to get back to our rooms and start writing.”

Synopsis:

The fourth and final memoir from Reynolds Price, “one of the most important voices in modern southern fiction” (The New York Times), who died in January 2011.

Reynolds Price was a true renaissance man. Author of thirty-seven books and professor of English at Duke, he was the last great southern regionalist of his generation. Picking up where his third memoir Ardent Spirits left off, Midstream provides an account of the years of his life from 1961-1965. During this brief period, perhaps the most leisurely of his life, Reynolds was on the cusp of adulthood, contemplating turning thirty, which, as he says, “is likely to be any man’s realization that, This is it. I’m now the person I’m likely to be from here to the end.” In this evocative memoir, Reynolds discusses publishing his first book, the pursuit of adult love, burying his mother, embarking on a teaching career, and buying his first home.

Upon his return to Oxford, Reynolds connects with a former lover with the hopes of rekindling their relationship. Disappointed to learn that this man is soon to be married, Reynolds pursues other pleasures: he travels to Denmark for a friend’s wedding; journeys through the English countryside for tea at charmed sites like Thame and Woodstock; dashes to Stratford to take in some Shakespeare; travels to Rome with famous British poet Stephen Spender, where he dines with Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor; and returns for more adventures in New York before finally heading home to North Carolina to resume teaching at Duke University.

In his signature spirited and witty prose, Midstream offers a poignant portrait of early adulthood. It is a fitting bookend for Price’s remarkable career and reinforces his place in literary history.

About the Author

andlt;Bandgt;Reynolds Priceandlt;/Bandgt; (1933-2011)andnbsp;was born in Macon, North Carolina. Educated at Duke University and, as a Rhodes Scholar, at Merton College, Oxford University, heandnbsp;taught at Duke beginning in 1958 andandnbsp;was theandnbsp;James B. Duke Professor of English at the time of his death. His first short stories, and many later ones, are published in his andlt;iandgt;Collected Storiesandlt;/iandgt;. andlt;iandgt;A Long and Happy Lifeandlt;/iandgt; was published in 1962 and won the William Faulkner Award for a best first novel. andlt;iandgt;Kate Vaidenandlt;/iandgt; was published in 1986 and won the National Book Critics Circle Award. andlt;iandgt;The Good Priest's Sonandlt;/iandgt; in 2005 was his fourteenth novel. Among his thirty-seven volumes are further collections of fiction, poetry, plays, essays, and translations. Price is a member of both the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and his work has been translated into seventeen languages.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781439183496
Subtitle:
An Unfinished Memoir
Author:
Price, Reynolds
Publisher:
Scribner
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
Biography - General
Subject:
Biography-Literary
Subject:
Reynolds Price; Ardent Spirits; Duke University; American literature; literary; A Long and Happy Life; William Faulkner Award; Kate Vaiden; National Book Critics Circle Award; Rhodes Scholar; American Academy of Arts and Letters; A Whole New Life; biblica
Subject:
Reynolds Price; Ardent Spirits; Duke University; American literature; literary; A Long and Happy Life; William Faulkner Award; Kate Vaiden; National Book Critics Circle Award; Rhodes Scholar; American Academy of Arts and Letters; A Whole New Life; biblica
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Hardback
Publication Date:
20120515
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Illustrations:
bandamp;w photos t-o
Pages:
192
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.12 in

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Product details 192 pages Scribner Book Company - English 9781439183496 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Price died of a heart attack before he could complete his memoir, the fourth in a series of autobiographical volumes. A prolific writer and academic, he spent more than five decades teaching at Duke University, his alma mater. The book begins in 1961 as Price, not even 30-years-old, returns to Oxford following his first three years teaching at Duke. His first novel, A Long and Happy Life, is about to be published in the U.S. to considerable praise, setting the writer on the road to literary renown. The book is full of anecdotes about famous figures, including philosopher/author Iris Murdoch, actress Natalie Wood, W.H. Auden, William Faulkner, and even Ronald Reagan, but the most scintillating scene finds the author lunching with mega-couple Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor in Rome while they're filming Cleopatra. However, the essence of the writer himself disappears behind these mildly amusing stories. The most poignant pages come when he recounts his mother's death: 'Despite the fact that I'd loved her unquestionably more, and longer, than anyone else in my life, I'd just instructed the doctor...to permit this body that had made my body more than thirty years ago, and had since dealt with me in boundless generosity, to rush ahead and die.' Had Price been able to complete his memoir, perhaps the message would be clear, but as it is, the reader is left wondering why he was writing it at all. Photos. "
Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , The final book from Reynolds Price, “one of the most important voices in modern Southern fiction” (The New York Times)—with a foreword by Anne Tyler and an afterwordby William Price

WHEN REYNOLDS PRICE DIED IN JANUARY 2011, he left behind one final piece of writing—two hundred candid, heartrending, and marvelously written manuscript pages about a critical period in his young adulthood. Picking up where his previous memoir, Ardent Spirits, left off, the work documents a brief time from 1961 to 1965, perhaps the most leisurely of Price’s life, but also one of enormous challenge and growth. Price gave it the title Midstream. Approaching thirty, Price writes, is to face the notion that “This is it. I’m now the person I’m likely to be . . . from here to the end.Midstream, which begins when Price is twenty-eight, details the final youthful adventures of a man on the cusp of artistic acclaim. Here, Price chases a love to England, only to meet heartbreak. Determined to pursue other pleasures, he travels to Sweden for a friend’s wedding, then journeys to Rome with British poet Stephen Spender and spends an afternoon with Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor. Price returns to the United States, where he finds company with a group of artists as he awaits the 1962 publication of his first novel, A Long and Happy Life.

“Few writers have made as dramatic an entrance on the American literary stage,” declared The New York Times on the book’s success. Price would settle into a tranquil life in North Carolina, buy a house, and resume teaching. Concluding with his mother’s death and Price’s new endeavors—a second novel and foray into Hollywood screenwriting—Midstream offers a poignant portrait of a man at the threshold of true adulthood, navigating new responsibilities and pleasures alike. It is a fitting bookend for Price’s remarkable career, and it reinforces his place in the pantheon of American literature.

***

 

FROM ANNE TYLER’S FOREWORD TO MIDSTREAM

“Just look at him flying across the campus, curls bouncing, dark eyes flashing, and a black cape (I swear it) flaring out behind him. Actually he never owned a black cape; he told me that, years later. He said it was a navy jacket, just tossed over his shoulders. But still, he was wearing a virtual cape, if you know what I mean. He was an exclamation point in a landscape of mostly declarative sentences. He lived in a house-trailer out in the woods; he invited us to come there and drink smoky-tasting tea in handmade mugs. Speaking with a trace of an English accent from his recent studies at Oxford (for he had a genius for unintentional mimicry, which he said could become a curse in certain situations), he told us funny, affectionate tales about his childhood in backwater Macon. Most of us came from Macons of our own; we were astonished to hear that they were fit subjects for storytelling. All over again, inspiration hit. Let us out of there! We had to get back to our rooms and start writing.”

"Synopsis" by , The fourth and final memoir from Reynolds Price, “one of the most important voices in modern southern fiction” (The New York Times), who died in January 2011.

Reynolds Price was a true renaissance man. Author of thirty-seven books and professor of English at Duke, he was the last great southern regionalist of his generation. Picking up where his third memoir Ardent Spirits left off, Midstream provides an account of the years of his life from 1961-1965. During this brief period, perhaps the most leisurely of his life, Reynolds was on the cusp of adulthood, contemplating turning thirty, which, as he says, “is likely to be any man’s realization that, This is it. I’m now the person I’m likely to be from here to the end.” In this evocative memoir, Reynolds discusses publishing his first book, the pursuit of adult love, burying his mother, embarking on a teaching career, and buying his first home.

Upon his return to Oxford, Reynolds connects with a former lover with the hopes of rekindling their relationship. Disappointed to learn that this man is soon to be married, Reynolds pursues other pleasures: he travels to Denmark for a friend’s wedding; journeys through the English countryside for tea at charmed sites like Thame and Woodstock; dashes to Stratford to take in some Shakespeare; travels to Rome with famous British poet Stephen Spender, where he dines with Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor; and returns for more adventures in New York before finally heading home to North Carolina to resume teaching at Duke University.

In his signature spirited and witty prose, Midstream offers a poignant portrait of early adulthood. It is a fitting bookend for Price’s remarkable career and reinforces his place in literary history.

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