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Gracefully Insane: Life and Death Inside America's Premier Mental Hospital

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Gracefully Insane: Life and Death Inside America's Premier Mental Hospital Cover

 

Staff Pick

Gracefully Insane is a captivating and entertaining biography of Boston's McLean Hospital, an asylum for the elite established in the early 19th century and still in operation today. Throughout are compelling and often humorous stories about both staff and the institution's inhabitants, some of whom included such celebrities as James Taylor, Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, Ray Charles, and Susanna Kaysen. Inseparable from the history of the hospital is the fascinatingly strange and unsettling history of early psychiatric treatment, my favorite parts of the book. Early techniques employed included ice-water baths, moral management, lobotomies, and insulin-induced comas. Satisfying on many levels, Beam's engaging writing will grab readers within the first few pages.
Recommended by Michal D., Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Boston Globe #1 bestseller and Book Sense 76 pick: A "candid and engrossing" (Vanity Fair) history of "the Harvard of mental institutions," and of the evolution of psychiatric treatment.

McLean Hospital is one of the most famous, most elite, and once most luxurious mental institutions in America. Its "alumni" include Sylvia Plath, John Forbes Nash, Ray Charles and Susanna Kaysen. James Taylor found inspiration for a song or two there; Frederic Law Olmsted first designed the grounds and later signed in as a patient. In its "golden age," McLean provided as gracious and gentle an environment for the treatment of mental illness as one could imagine. But the golden age is over, and a downsized, downscale McLean is struggling to stay afloat.

Boston Globe columnist Alex Beam's Gracefully Insane is an entertaining and strangely poignant biography of McLean from its founding in 1817 through today. The story of McLean is also the story of the hopes and failures of psychology and psychotherapy; of the evolution of attitudes about mental illness; and of the economic pressures that are making McLean — and other institutions like it — relics of a bygone age.

This is fascinating reading for the many readers interested in either the literature of madness — from The Bell Jar to Girl, Interrupted to A Beautiful Mind — or in the history of its treatment.

Review:

"Touching, humorous, illuminating — in short, irresistible." Chicago Tribune

Review:

"Alex Beam succeeds in telling several stories simultaneously, weaving an account of changing attitudes toward mental illness, the methods employed in its treatment and the shifting context of the larger culture into an entertaining narrative that centers on the hospital and its history." The New York Times Book Review

Review:

"[Beam's] book shapes extensive research into an absorbing saga braiding two overlapping histories: McLean's and psychiatry's....This is the work of a writer with a mind active and a heart awake." Boston Globe

Review:

"[Beam] elicits fascinating stories from both residents and staff...[and] has nicely traced the history of this institution and its inhabitants." Entertainment Weekly

Review:

"[A] fascinating, gossipy social history....More than a history of a psychiatric institution, the book offers an unusual glimpse of a celebrated American estate: the Boston aristocracy that produced, for nearly two centuries, an endless stream of brilliant, troubled eccentrics and the equally brilliant and eccentric doctors who lined up to treat them." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"[A] quirky work of social history....[A]n oddly entertaining narrative that reads easily and supplies fascinating details about business, pop music, and literary figures....Name-dropping is rampant, reflecting one former patient's view that staying at McLean was comparable to attending a progressive college." Library Journal

Review:

"Gracefully Insane is an engaging piece of Sunday-supplement journalism built around stories of the patients and the people who cared for them. It relies heavily but narrowly on the official history of the hospital, but its most important source is interviews conducted by the author with a number of informants....[F]ull of captivating stories that, in the end, add up to a sorry rehearsal of the slogans that have long stigmatized persons with mental disorders and the people who treat them." Miles F. Shore, M.D., The New England Journal of Medicine

Review:

"An engaging history of the psychiatric treatment of the American socioeconomic elite since the early 19th century." Barron's Financial Review

Review:

"Beam tells good stories and with an appropriate tone — intrigued and respectful, but not pious." The Washington Post

Synopsis:

An entertaining and poignant social history of McLean Hospital--temporary home to many of the troubled geniuses of our age--and of the evolution of the treatment of mental illness from the early 19th century to today

Synopsis:

Its landscaped ground, chosen by Frederick Law Olmsted and dotted with Tudor mansions, could belong to a New England prep school. There are no fences, no guards, no locked gates. But McLean Hospital is a mental institution-one of the most famous, most elite, and once most luxurious in America. McLean "alumni" include Olmsted himself, Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, James Taylor and Ray Charles, as well as (more secretly) other notables from among the rich and famous. In its "golden age," McLean provided as genteel an environment for the treatment of mental illness as one could imagine. But the golden age is over, and a downsized, downscale McLean-despite its affiliation with Harvard University-is struggling to stay afloat. Gracefully Insane, by Boston Globe columnist Alex Beam, is a fascinating and emotional biography of McLean Hospital from its founding in 1817 through today. It is filled with stories about patients and doctors: the Ralph Waldo Emerson protégé whose brilliance disappeared along with his madness; Anne Sexton's poetry seminar, and many more. The story of McLean is also the story of the hopes and failures of psychology and psychotherapy; of the evolution of attitudes about mental illness, of approaches to treatment, and of the economic pressures that are making McLean-and other institutions like it-relics of a bygone age.

This is a compelling and often oddly poignant reading for fans of books like Plath's The Bell Jar and Susanna Kaysen's Girl, Interrupted (both inspired by their author's stays at McLean) and for anyone interested in the history of medicine or psychotherapy, or the social history of New England.

About the Author

Alex Beam is a columnist for the Boston Globe and the author of two novels. He has also written for The Atlantic, Slate, and Forbes/FYI. He lives in Newton, Massachusetts with his wife and three sons.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 2 comments:

Shoshana, December 21, 2007 (view all comments by Shoshana)
This rather superficial book can't decide whether it's a history of McLean Hospital, or celebrity dish about famous people who have been McLean patients, or a critique of psychiatry. It doesn't quite manage to be any of these, so it comes off as fairly meanspirited and catty. Adding to the problem is Beam's writing, which has an airy tone and seems to assert that author and reader are complicit and in agreement about Beam's negative views, coupled with Beam's lack of knowledge about the history and contemporary practices of psychiatry. Beam seems to relish describing treatments such as hydrotherapy and coldpacks that are not used today and would be considered bizarre in contemporary psychiatry. Because he does not place McLean's practices in the context of contemporaneous psychiatry, he implies by omission that only McLean was stupid enough to use these practices. This isn't so.

Beam's knowledge of current practice also seems scant. His diagnostic impressions when he speculates are often reductive and inaccurate, and his assertions about current diagnosis and treatment are strangely incomplete.

As a person who has worked in a number of inpatient facilities (both public and private, both before and in the era of managed care), I find myself in vehement disagreement with statements such as "A certain cynicism attends any hospital's long-term treatment of wealthy patients who pay their bills in full and who subsidize the care of less fortunate souls" (210). I disagree not because I think that all hospitals are great, or believe wholeheartedly in their interventions, or think they don't consider their bottom line, but because this is not how hospital staff think about and talk about patients. This is Beam's cynicism, not the attitude of the majority of people working in psychiatric facilities.

For better books about psychiatric hospitals, read Winchester's The Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary, Hunt's excellent Mental Hospital (from 1962), or any of the many complex and insightful accounts by patients and staff alike.
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crowyhead, August 22, 2006 (view all comments by crowyhead)
The story of McLean hospital, one of the most famous mental hospitals in the US. Sometimes it seems as though anyone who's anyone spent time in McLean; throughout the 20th century it was famous for catering to the rich and famous with the utmost discretion. Among its "alumni" are poet Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath (who based her novel The Bell Jar on her experiences there), James Taylor and his siblings, Susanna Kaysen (who wrote about her experiences in Girl, Interrupted), Nobel Prize winner John Nash, and Ray Charles, just to name a few.

In many ways, the history of McLean is the history of the last century of mental health care, although McLean as whole has been a kinder, gentler place than most mental hospitals. There are still stories of brutal, though well-intentioned, treatments: insulin shock therapy, icy hydrotherapy, electroshock therapy (with much higher levels of electricy than today's electroconvulsive therapy). Only a handful of lobotomies were ever performed at McLean, however, and the main emphasis was on milieu therapy -- the theory that providing structure and a relaxed, comfortable environment would go farther to help patients than any invasive procedure.

Of course, the milieu therapy led to a lot of long-term residents at McLean. In the heydey of psychoanalysis, the intake period was 40 days -- the actual treatment usually didn't start for weeks. This kind of treatment has fallen by the wayside in recent years, as health insurance and rising healthcare costs make it impossible for patients to afford more than the usual five day stay, and in turn, McLean is now a ghost of what it once was. It's easy to feel sort of nostalgic for the "old days" of psychotherapy, particularly since insurance and an overloaded system mean that many patients are diagnosed, given drugs, and only receive a very limited amount of talk therapy, if any at all. On the other hand, there's little evidence that McLean's milieu therapy was any more effective than the current methods, particularly in the case of psychotic patients. Still, one wishes somewhat for a happy medium -- no six month hospital stays, but enough time to offer a little caring and patience. As this book makes clear, however, this luxury was only ever available to the very rich, even when it was considered the best treatment for what ails you.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781586481612
Author:
Beam, Alex
Publisher:
PublicAffairs
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Mental Illness
Subject:
Psychiatric hospitals
Subject:
McLean Hospital
Subject:
World
Subject:
Psychology : General
Subject:
Psychology - Schizophrenia and Psychotic Disorders
Copyright:
Edition Number:
1st paperback ed.
Edition Description:
Trade Paper
Series Volume:
108-299
Publication Date:
January 7, 2003
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
296
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 11.8 oz

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Health and Self-Help » Psychology » History and Politics
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Schizophrenia and Psychotic Disorders
Humanities » Philosophy » General

Gracefully Insane: Life and Death Inside America's Premier Mental Hospital New Trade Paper
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Product details 296 pages PublicAffairs - English 9781586481612 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Gracefully Insane is a captivating and entertaining biography of Boston's McLean Hospital, an asylum for the elite established in the early 19th century and still in operation today. Throughout are compelling and often humorous stories about both staff and the institution's inhabitants, some of whom included such celebrities as James Taylor, Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, Ray Charles, and Susanna Kaysen. Inseparable from the history of the hospital is the fascinatingly strange and unsettling history of early psychiatric treatment, my favorite parts of the book. Early techniques employed included ice-water baths, moral management, lobotomies, and insulin-induced comas. Satisfying on many levels, Beam's engaging writing will grab readers within the first few pages.

"Review" by , "Touching, humorous, illuminating — in short, irresistible."
"Review" by , "Alex Beam succeeds in telling several stories simultaneously, weaving an account of changing attitudes toward mental illness, the methods employed in its treatment and the shifting context of the larger culture into an entertaining narrative that centers on the hospital and its history."
"Review" by , "[Beam's] book shapes extensive research into an absorbing saga braiding two overlapping histories: McLean's and psychiatry's....This is the work of a writer with a mind active and a heart awake."
"Review" by , "[Beam] elicits fascinating stories from both residents and staff...[and] has nicely traced the history of this institution and its inhabitants."
"Review" by , "[A] fascinating, gossipy social history....More than a history of a psychiatric institution, the book offers an unusual glimpse of a celebrated American estate: the Boston aristocracy that produced, for nearly two centuries, an endless stream of brilliant, troubled eccentrics and the equally brilliant and eccentric doctors who lined up to treat them."
"Review" by , "[A] quirky work of social history....[A]n oddly entertaining narrative that reads easily and supplies fascinating details about business, pop music, and literary figures....Name-dropping is rampant, reflecting one former patient's view that staying at McLean was comparable to attending a progressive college."
"Review" by , "Gracefully Insane is an engaging piece of Sunday-supplement journalism built around stories of the patients and the people who cared for them. It relies heavily but narrowly on the official history of the hospital, but its most important source is interviews conducted by the author with a number of informants....[F]ull of captivating stories that, in the end, add up to a sorry rehearsal of the slogans that have long stigmatized persons with mental disorders and the people who treat them."
"Review" by , "An engaging history of the psychiatric treatment of the American socioeconomic elite since the early 19th century."
"Review" by , "Beam tells good stories and with an appropriate tone — intrigued and respectful, but not pious."
"Synopsis" by ,
An entertaining and poignant social history of McLean Hospital--temporary home to many of the troubled geniuses of our age--and of the evolution of the treatment of mental illness from the early 19th century to today
"Synopsis" by ,
Its landscaped ground, chosen by Frederick Law Olmsted and dotted with Tudor mansions, could belong to a New England prep school. There are no fences, no guards, no locked gates. But McLean Hospital is a mental institution-one of the most famous, most elite, and once most luxurious in America. McLean "alumni" include Olmsted himself, Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, James Taylor and Ray Charles, as well as (more secretly) other notables from among the rich and famous. In its "golden age," McLean provided as genteel an environment for the treatment of mental illness as one could imagine. But the golden age is over, and a downsized, downscale McLean-despite its affiliation with Harvard University-is struggling to stay afloat. Gracefully Insane, by Boston Globe columnist Alex Beam, is a fascinating and emotional biography of McLean Hospital from its founding in 1817 through today. It is filled with stories about patients and doctors: the Ralph Waldo Emerson protégé whose brilliance disappeared along with his madness; Anne Sexton's poetry seminar, and many more. The story of McLean is also the story of the hopes and failures of psychology and psychotherapy; of the evolution of attitudes about mental illness, of approaches to treatment, and of the economic pressures that are making McLean-and other institutions like it-relics of a bygone age.

This is a compelling and often oddly poignant reading for fans of books like Plath's The Bell Jar and Susanna Kaysen's Girl, Interrupted (both inspired by their author's stays at McLean) and for anyone interested in the history of medicine or psychotherapy, or the social history of New England.

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