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Everything Flows (New York Review Books Classics)

by

Everything Flows (New York Review Books Classics) Cover

ISBN13: 9781590173282
ISBN10: 1590173287
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A New York Review Books Original

Everything Flows is Vasily Grossmans final testament, written after the Soviet authorities suppressed his masterpiece, Life and Fate. The main story is simple: released after thirty years in the Soviet camps, Ivan Grigoryevich must struggle to find a place for himself in an unfamiliar world. But in a novel that seeks to take in the whole tragedy of Soviet history, Ivans story is only one among many. Thus we also hear about Ivans cousin, Nikolay, a scientist who never let his conscience interfere with his career, and Pinegin, the informer who got Ivan sent to the camps. Then a brilliant short play interrupts the narrative: a series of informers steps forward, each making excuses for the inexcusable things that he did—inexcusable and yet, the informers plead, in Stalinist Russia understandable, almost unavoidable. And at the core of the book, we find the story of Anna Sergeyevna, Ivans lover, who tells about her eager involvement as an activist in the Terror famine of 1932-33, which led to the deaths of three to five million Ukrainian peasants. Here Everything Flows attains an unbearable lucidity comparable to the last cantos of Dantes Inferno.

Synopsis:

"Everything Flows" is the last novel by Grossman, written after the Soviet authorities suppressed his extraordinary epic of besieged Stalingrad, "Life and Fate."

Synopsis:

A New York Review Books Original

Everything Flows is Vasily Grossmans final testament, written after the Soviet authorities suppressed his masterpiece, Life and Fate. The main story is simple: released after thirty years in the Soviet camps, Ivan Grigoryevich must struggle to find a place for himself in an unfamiliar world. But in a novel that seeks to take in the whole tragedy of Soviet history, Ivans story is only one among many. Thus we also hear about Ivans cousin, Nikolay, a scientist who never let his conscience interfere with his career, and Pinegin, the informer who got Ivan sent to the camps. Then a brilliant short play interrupts the narrative: a series of informers steps forward, each making excuses for the inexcusable things that he didinexcusable and yet, the informers plead, in Stalinist Russia understandable, almost unavoidable. And at the core of the book, we find the story of Anna Sergeyevna, Ivans lover, who tells about her eager involvement as an activist in the Terror famine of 1932–33, which led to the deaths of three to five million Ukrainian peasants. Here Everything Flows attains an unbearable lucidity comparable to the last cantos of Dantes Inferno.

About the Author

Vasily Semyonovich Grossman was born on December 12, 1905, in Berdichev, a Ukrainian town that was home to one of Europes largest Jewish communities. In 1934 he published both “In the Town of Berdichev”—a short story that won the admiration of such diverse writers as Maksim Gorky, Mikhail Bulgakov, and Isaak Babel—and a novel, Glyukauf, about the life of the Donbass miners. During the Second World War, Grossman worked as a reporter for the army newspaper Red Star, covering nearly all of the most important battles from the defense of Moscow to the fall of Berlin. His vivid yet sober “The Hell of Treblinka” (late 1944), one of the first articles in any language about a Nazi death camp, was translated and used as testimony in the Nuremberg trials. His novel For a Just Cause (originally titled Stalingrad) was published in 1952 and then fiercely attacked. A new wave of purges—directed against the Jews—was about to begin; but for Stalins death in March 1953, Grossman would almost certainly have been arrested. During the next few years Grossman, while enjoying public success, worked on his two masterpieces, neither of which was to be published in Russia until the late 1980s: Life and Fate and Everything Flows. The KGB confiscated the manuscript of Life and Fate in February 1961. Grossman was able, however, to continue working on Everything Flows, a work even more critical of Soviet society than Life and Fate, until his last days in the hospital. He died on September 14, 1964, on the eve of the twenty-third anniversary of the massacre of the Jews of Berdichev, in which his mother had died.

Robert Chandlers translations of Sappho and Guillaume Apollinaire are published in the series “Everymans Poetry.” His translations from Russian include Vasily Grossmans Life and Fate, Leskovs Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk and Aleksander Pushkins Dubrovsky and The Captains Daughter. Together with his wife, Elizabeth, and other colleagues he has co-translated numerous works by Andrey Platonov. One of these, Soul, was chosen in 2004 as “best translation of the year from a Slavonic language” by the AATSEEL (the American Association of Teachers of Slavonic and East European Languages); it was also shortlisted for the 2005 Rossica Translation Prize and the Weidenfeld European Translation Prize. Robert Chandlers translation of Hamid Ismailovs The Railway won the AATSEEL prize for 2007 and received a special commendation from the judges of the 2007 Rossica Translation Prize. Robert Chandler is the editor of Russian Short Stories from Pushkin to Buida and the author of a biography of Alexander Pushkin.

Elizabeth Chandler is a co-translator of Platonovs Soul and Pushkins The Captains Daughter.

Anna Aslanyans translations into Russian include works of fiction by Mavis Gallant, Zadie Smith, Jonathan Lethem, Rod Liddle, and Ali Smith. She is a contributor to the BBC Russian Service.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

pelagia, January 3, 2011 (view all comments by pelagia)
A beautifully written book that takes one from the depths of despair to the summits of the kindness of one. This is a book that totally envelops the reader. I could not stop reading it, but I made sure to go slowly, deliberately and think about the context in which this book was written.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9781590173282
Author:
Grossman, Vasily
Publisher:
New York Review of Books
Translator:
Chandler, Robert
Translator:
Chandler, Elizabeth
Author:
Aslanyan, Anna
Author:
Chandler, Robert
Author:
Grossman, Vasily
Author:
Chandler, Elizabeth
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Soviet Union
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
fiction;russia;russian;novel;literature;vasily grossman;russian literature;gulag;soviet union;20th century;stalin
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
New York Review Books Classics
Publication Date:
20091231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
272
Dimensions:
7.98x5.28x.60 in. .59 lbs.

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Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Sale Books

Everything Flows (New York Review Books Classics) New Trade Paper
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Product details 272 pages New York Review of Books - English 9781590173282 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , "Everything Flows" is the last novel by Grossman, written after the Soviet authorities suppressed his extraordinary epic of besieged Stalingrad, "Life and Fate."
"Synopsis" by , A New York Review Books Original

Everything Flows is Vasily Grossmans final testament, written after the Soviet authorities suppressed his masterpiece, Life and Fate. The main story is simple: released after thirty years in the Soviet camps, Ivan Grigoryevich must struggle to find a place for himself in an unfamiliar world. But in a novel that seeks to take in the whole tragedy of Soviet history, Ivans story is only one among many. Thus we also hear about Ivans cousin, Nikolay, a scientist who never let his conscience interfere with his career, and Pinegin, the informer who got Ivan sent to the camps. Then a brilliant short play interrupts the narrative: a series of informers steps forward, each making excuses for the inexcusable things that he didinexcusable and yet, the informers plead, in Stalinist Russia understandable, almost unavoidable. And at the core of the book, we find the story of Anna Sergeyevna, Ivans lover, who tells about her eager involvement as an activist in the Terror famine of 1932–33, which led to the deaths of three to five million Ukrainian peasants. Here Everything Flows attains an unbearable lucidity comparable to the last cantos of Dantes Inferno.

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