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Lucky Jim

by

Lucky Jim Cover

 

Staff Pick

What is so funny about academia? Who knows! But so many great novelists have written hilarious novels that take place on a college campus, the academic satire has become its own genre. Richard Russo, Francine Prose, David Lodge, James Hynes... so many good ones! But the greatest of them all remains Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis. If you haven't read it, get started. About as good a time as you can have with your nose in a book.
Recommended by Martin, Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Unsavory artists, titled boobs, and charlatans with an affinity for Freud—such are the oddballs whose antics animate the early novels of the late British master Anthony Powell. A genius of social satire delivered with a very dry wit, Powell builds his comedies on the foibles of British high society between the wars, delving into subjects as various as psychoanalysis, the film industry, publishing, and (of course) sex. More explorations of relationships and vanity than plot-driven narratives, these slim novels reveal the early stirrings of the unequaled style, ear for dialogue, and eye for irony that would reach their caustic peak in Powells epic A Dance to the Music of Time.

 

From a View to a Death takes us to a dilapidated country estate where an ambitious artist of questionable talent, a family of landed aristocrats wondering where the money has gone, and a secretly cross-dressing squire all commingle among the ruins.

 

Written from a vantage point both high and necessarily narrow, Powells early novels nevertheless deal in the universal themes that would become a substantial part of his oeuvre: pride, greed, and what makes people behave as they do. Filled with eccentric characters and piercing insights, Powells work is achingly hilarious, human, and true.

Synopsis:

1935, London: Anthony Powell is honing the edge of his humor on psychoanalysis and the film industry.
Two young London charlatans, an amateur Freudian analyst and an bully with “connections with the film industry”  both get their claws into a young man with a small fortune to spend.  The plot takes them to Paris and Berlin, art galleries and whore-houses. The women are moochers, the art dealers knaves, the wealthy Americans uncultured boobs, the action is lively, and the writing clever. A very funny period piece.

Synopsis:

FROM A VIEW TO A DEATH (1933) is set at a dilapidated English country estate. It brings together a miscellany of country and city types: spoiled, shy Mary Passenger, whose father hopes she will marry into money to help support Passenger Court; ambitious Zouch, who imagines himself an “Ubermensch”; and Major Fosdick, secretly cross-dressing when not out riding. (V. S. Pritchett describes the book as “featuring the undesirable artist among the speechless fox hunters.”)   Powell wrote this when he was 27 years old; he mocks with gusto the prejudices and mindlessness of English landed gentry. But as the story moves along, suffering adds humanity to his caricatures, even the “objectionable country squire.”

Synopsis:

Regarded by many as the finest, and funniest, comic novel of the twentieth century, Lucky Jim remains as trenchant, withering, and eloquently misanthropic as when it first scandalized readers in 1954. This is the story of Jim Dixon, a hapless lecturer in medieval history at a provincial university who knows better than most that “there was no end to the ways in which nice things are nicer than nasty ones.” Kingsley Amis’s scabrous debut leads the reader through a gallery of emphatically English bores, cranks, frauds, and neurotics with whom Dixon must contend in one way or another in order to hold on to his cushy academic perch and win the girl of his fancy.

More than just a merciless satire of cloistered college life and stuffy postwar manners, Lucky Jim is an attack on the forces of boredom, whatever form they may take, and a work of art that at once distills and extends an entire tradition of English comic writing, from Fielding and Dickens through Wodehouse and Waugh. As Christopher Hitchens has written, “If you can picture Bertie or Jeeves being capable of actual malice, and simultaneously imagine Evelyn Waugh forgetting about original sin, you have the combination of innocence and experience that makes this short romp so imperishable.”

About the Author

Kingsley Amis (1922–1995) was a popular and prolific British novelist, poet, and critic, widely regarded as one of the greatest satirical writers of the twentieth century. He won an English scholarship to St. John’s College, Oxford, where he began a lifelong friendship with fellow student Philip Larkin. Following army service in World War II, he completed his degree and joined the faculty at the University College of Swansea in Wales. Lucky Jim, his first novel, appeared in 1954 to great acclaim and won a Somerset Maugham Award; from that point on he would publish roughly a book a year. Amis received the Booker Prize for his novel The Old Devils (also available from NYRB Classics) in 1986 and was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1990.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781590175750
Author:
Amis, Kingsley
Publisher:
New York Review of Books
Author:
Amis, Kingsley
Author:
Gessen, Keith
Author:
Powell, Anthony
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
Humorous
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Paperback
Publication Date:
20121031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
8.5 x 5.5 x 0.6 in

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Film and Television » Novelization
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Satire

Lucky Jim New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$14.95 In Stock
Product details 224 pages New York Review of Books - English 9781590175750 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

What is so funny about academia? Who knows! But so many great novelists have written hilarious novels that take place on a college campus, the academic satire has become its own genre. Richard Russo, Francine Prose, David Lodge, James Hynes... so many good ones! But the greatest of them all remains Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis. If you haven't read it, get started. About as good a time as you can have with your nose in a book.

"Synopsis" by ,
1935, London: Anthony Powell is honing the edge of his humor on psychoanalysis and the film industry.
Two young London charlatans, an amateur Freudian analyst and an bully with “connections with the film industry”  both get their claws into a young man with a small fortune to spend.  The plot takes them to Paris and Berlin, art galleries and whore-houses. The women are moochers, the art dealers knaves, the wealthy Americans uncultured boobs, the action is lively, and the writing clever. A very funny period piece.

"Synopsis" by ,
FROM A VIEW TO A DEATH (1933) is set at a dilapidated English country estate. It brings together a miscellany of country and city types: spoiled, shy Mary Passenger, whose father hopes she will marry into money to help support Passenger Court; ambitious Zouch, who imagines himself an “Ubermensch”; and Major Fosdick, secretly cross-dressing when not out riding. (V. S. Pritchett describes the book as “featuring the undesirable artist among the speechless fox hunters.”)   Powell wrote this when he was 27 years old; he mocks with gusto the prejudices and mindlessness of English landed gentry. But as the story moves along, suffering adds humanity to his caricatures, even the “objectionable country squire.”

"Synopsis" by , Regarded by many as the finest, and funniest, comic novel of the twentieth century, Lucky Jim remains as trenchant, withering, and eloquently misanthropic as when it first scandalized readers in 1954. This is the story of Jim Dixon, a hapless lecturer in medieval history at a provincial university who knows better than most that “there was no end to the ways in which nice things are nicer than nasty ones.” Kingsley Amis’s scabrous debut leads the reader through a gallery of emphatically English bores, cranks, frauds, and neurotics with whom Dixon must contend in one way or another in order to hold on to his cushy academic perch and win the girl of his fancy.

More than just a merciless satire of cloistered college life and stuffy postwar manners, Lucky Jim is an attack on the forces of boredom, whatever form they may take, and a work of art that at once distills and extends an entire tradition of English comic writing, from Fielding and Dickens through Wodehouse and Waugh. As Christopher Hitchens has written, “If you can picture Bertie or Jeeves being capable of actual malice, and simultaneously imagine Evelyn Waugh forgetting about original sin, you have the combination of innocence and experience that makes this short romp so imperishable.”

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