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Original Essays | September 15, 2014

Lois Leveen: IMG Forsooth Me Not: Shakespeare, Juliet, Her Nurse, and a Novel



There's this writer, William Shakespeare. Perhaps you've heard of him. He wrote this play, Romeo and Juliet. Maybe you've heard of it as well. It's... Continue »
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The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains

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The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

“Is Google making us stupid?” When Nicholas Carr posed that question, in a celebrated Atlantic Monthly cover story, he tapped into a well of anxiety about how the Internet is changing us. He also crystallized one of the most important debates of our time: As we enjoy the Net’s bounties, are we sacrificing our ability to read and think deeply? Now, Carr expands his argument into the most compelling exploration of the Internet’s intellectual and cultural consequences yet published. As he describes how human thought has been shaped through the centuries by “tools of the mind”—from the alphabet to maps, to the printing press, the clock, and the computer—Carr interweaves a fascinating account of recent discoveries in neuroscience by such pioneers as Michael Merzenich and Eric Kandel. Our brains, the historical and scientific evidence reveals, change in response to our experiences. The technologies we use to find, store, and share information can literally reroute our neural pathways. Building on the insights of thinkers from Plato to McLuhan, Carr makes a convincing case that every information technology carries an intellectual ethic—a set of assumptions about the nature of knowledge and intelligence. He explains how the printed book served to focus our attention, promoting deep and creative thought. In stark contrast, the Internet encourages the rapid, distracted sampling of small bits of information from many sources. Its ethic is that of the industrialist, an ethic of speed and efficiency, of optimized production and consumption—and now the Net is remaking us in its own image. We are becoming ever more adept at scanning and skimming, but what we are losing is our capacity for concentration, contemplation, and reflection. Part intellectual history, part popular science, and part cultural criticism, The Shallows sparkles with memorable vignettes—Friedrich Nietzsche wrestling with a typewriter, Sigmund Freud dissecting the brains of sea creatures, Nathaniel Hawthorne contemplating the thunderous approach of a steam locomotive—even as it plumbs profound questions about the state of our modern psyche. This is a book that will forever alter the way we think about media and our minds.

Synopsis:

The best-selling author of The Big Switchreturns with an explosive look at technology’s effect on the mind.

Synopsis:

Expanding on an article that appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, the best-selling author of The Big Switch discusses the intellectual and cultural consequences of the Internet, and how it may be transforming our neural pathways for the worse.

Synopsis:

'\'Is Google making us stupid?\' When Nicholas Carr posed that question in a celebrated Atlantic Monthlycover story, he tapped into a well of anxiety about how the Internet is changing us. He also crystallized one of the most important debates of our time: As we enjoy the Net\"s bounties, are we sacrificing our ability to read and think deeply? Now Carr expands his argument into the most compelling exploration of the Internet\"s intellectual and cultural consequences yet published. Weaving insights from philosophy, neuroscience, and history into a rich narrative, The Shallowsexplains how the Net is rerouting our neural pathways, replacing the subtle mind of the book reader with the distracted mind of the screen watcher. A gripping story of human transformation played out against a backdrop of technological upheaval, The Shallowswill forever alter the way we think about media and our minds.'

About the Author

Nicholas Carr is the author of The Big Switch and Does IT Matter? He has written for the New York Times, Atlantic, New Republic, Wired, and other periodicals. He lives in Colorado with his wife

Table of Contents

Prologue: The watchdog and the thief — Hal and me — The vital parts — On what the brain thinks about when it thinks about itself — Tools of the mind — The deepening page — On Lee de Forest and his amazing audion — A medium of the most general nature — The very image of a book — The juggler's brain — On the buoyancy of IQ scores — The church of Google — Search, memory — On the writing of this book — A thing like me — Human elements.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393079364
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Subject:
Philosophy & Aspects
Author:
Nicholas Carr
Author:
Carr, Nicholas G.
Author:
Carr, Nicholas
Subject:
Philosophy & Social Aspects
Subject:
Internet - General
Subject:
Neuropsychology
Subject:
Cognitive Psychology
Subject:
Internet--Psychological aspects
Subject:
Audio Books-Internet
Subject:
Audio Books-Sociology
Subject:
Audio Books-World History
Subject:
Biology-Neurobiology
Subject:
History of Science-Technology
Subject:
Psychology-Cognitive Science
Subject:
Science Reference-Philosophy of Science
Subject:
World History-General
Subject:
Foreign Languages-Chinese
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Subject:
Science : Philosophy & Social Aspects
Subject:
Computers : Internet - General
Subject:
Psychology : Neuropsychology
Subject:
Computers : Social Aspects - Human-Computer Interaction
Publication Date:
June 2011
Binding:
eBooks
Language:
English
Pages:
280

Related Subjects

Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » Social Aspects » General
Computers and Internet » Computers Reference » Social Aspects » Human and Computer Interaction
Computers and Internet » Internet » General
Computers and Internet » Internet » Information
Computers and Internet » Internet » Web Publishing
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Cognitive Science
Health and Self-Help » Psychology » Mind and Consciousness
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
Reference » Science Reference » General
Reference » Science Reference » Philosophy of Science

The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains
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$ In Stock
Product details 280 pages W. W. Norton - English 9780393079364 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The best-selling author of The Big Switchreturns with an explosive look at technology’s effect on the mind.
"Synopsis" by , Expanding on an article that appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, the best-selling author of The Big Switch discusses the intellectual and cultural consequences of the Internet, and how it may be transforming our neural pathways for the worse.
"Synopsis" by , '\'Is Google making us stupid?\' When Nicholas Carr posed that question in a celebrated Atlantic Monthlycover story, he tapped into a well of anxiety about how the Internet is changing us. He also crystallized one of the most important debates of our time: As we enjoy the Net\"s bounties, are we sacrificing our ability to read and think deeply? Now Carr expands his argument into the most compelling exploration of the Internet\"s intellectual and cultural consequences yet published. Weaving insights from philosophy, neuroscience, and history into a rich narrative, The Shallowsexplains how the Net is rerouting our neural pathways, replacing the subtle mind of the book reader with the distracted mind of the screen watcher. A gripping story of human transformation played out against a backdrop of technological upheaval, The Shallowswill forever alter the way we think about media and our minds.'
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