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Racist America: Roots, Current Realities, and Future Reparations

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Racist America: Roots, Current Realities, and Future Reparations Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

When Molly Wizenberg's father died of cancer, everyone told her to go easy on herself, to hold off on making any major decisions for a while. But when she tried going back to her apartment in Seattle and returning to graduate school, she knew it wasn't possible to resume life as though nothing had happened. So she went to Paris, a city that held vivid memories of a childhood trip with her father, of early morning walks on the cobbled streets of the Latin Quarter and the taste of her first pain au chocolat. She was supposed to be doing research for her dissertation, but more often, she found herself peering through the windows of chocolate shops, trekking across town to try a new patisserie, or tasting cheeses at outdoor markets, until one evening when she sat in the Luxembourg Gardens reading cookbooks until it was too dark to see, she realized that her heart was not in her studies but in the kitchen.

At first, it wasn't clear where this epiphany might lead. Like her long letters home describing the details of every meal and market, Molly's blog Orangette started out merely as a pleasant pastime. But it wasn't long before her writing and recipes developed an international following. Every week, devoted readers logged on to find out what Molly was cooking, eating, reading, and thinking, and it seemed she had finally found her passion. But the story wasn't over: one reader in particular, a curly-haired, food-loving composer from New York, found himself enchanted by the redhead in Seattle, and their email correspondence blossomed into a long-distance romance.

In A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes from My Kitchen Table, Molly Wizenberg recounts a life with the kitchen at its center. From her mother's pound cake, a staple of summer picnics during her childhood in Oklahoma, to the eggs she cooked for her father during the weeks before his death, food and memories are intimately entwined. You won't be able to decide whether to curl up and sink into the story or to head straight to the market to fill your basket with ingredients for Cider-Glazed Salmon and Pistachio Cake with Honeyed Apricots.

Review:

"Wizenberg's debut shares the same basic format as her Orangette blog — favorite recipes interspersed with personal reflection — but constructed around a much tighter family narrative. Memories of her father, for example, begin with his cherished formula for potato salad and an attempt to recreate his French toast, but also include a variation on scrambled eggs that spurred a comforting moment as he was dying of cancer. The second half of the memoir focuses on her blossoming relationship with Brandon, who started out as a fan of the blog, became a long-distance boyfriend and eventually moved to Seattle and married her — of course, she shares the recipes for the pickled carrots they served at the wedding as well as the chocolate cake she baked for dessert. Though there is an emphasis on desserts, the recipes cover a variety of meals, none beyond the range of an ordinary cook, and Wizenberg's directions are laced with a charming voice that strikes a neat balance with the reflective passages. Her strong personality stands out among her generation's culinary voices." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

A memoir with a practical purpose and a cookbook with a life beyond the kitchen, this resource offers 50 recipes full of fresh flavors, and the author's lessons from the kitchen that show who people are, who they love, and who they want to be.

Product Details

ISBN:
9781135959654
Publisher:
Routledge
Subject:
Social Science : Ethnic Studies - African American Studies -
Author:
Wizenberg, Molly
Author:
Feagin, Joe R.
Subject:
Social Science : Discrimination & Racism
Subject:
Social Science : Sociology - General
Subject:
History : United States - 20th Century
Publication Date:
September 2012
Binding:
eBooks
Language:
English
Pages:
304

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » African American Studies » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Racism and Ethnic Conflict
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General

Racist America: Roots, Current Realities, and Future Reparations
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 304 pages Routledge - English 9781135959654 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Wizenberg's debut shares the same basic format as her Orangette blog — favorite recipes interspersed with personal reflection — but constructed around a much tighter family narrative. Memories of her father, for example, begin with his cherished formula for potato salad and an attempt to recreate his French toast, but also include a variation on scrambled eggs that spurred a comforting moment as he was dying of cancer. The second half of the memoir focuses on her blossoming relationship with Brandon, who started out as a fan of the blog, became a long-distance boyfriend and eventually moved to Seattle and married her — of course, she shares the recipes for the pickled carrots they served at the wedding as well as the chocolate cake she baked for dessert. Though there is an emphasis on desserts, the recipes cover a variety of meals, none beyond the range of an ordinary cook, and Wizenberg's directions are laced with a charming voice that strikes a neat balance with the reflective passages. Her strong personality stands out among her generation's culinary voices." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , A memoir with a practical purpose and a cookbook with a life beyond the kitchen, this resource offers 50 recipes full of fresh flavors, and the author's lessons from the kitchen that show who people are, who they love, and who they want to be.
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