Poetry Madness
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Interviews | March 9, 2015

    Rhianna Walton: IMG Erik Larson: The Powells.com Interview



    Erik LarsonI've been a fan of Erik Larson's riveting brand of narrative history for years, and his latest book, Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania,... Continue »
    1. $19.60 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    spacer

This item may be
out of stock.

Click on the button below to search for this title in other formats.


Check for Availability
Add to Wishlist

97 Orchard: An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement

by

97 Orchard: An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement  Cover

 

Staff Pick

I love looking at history through the telescope of a particular subject, in this case, the food of New York immigrants at the turn of the century. Not so very long ago, our hot dogs, bagels, and lasagna were exotic introductions to this country. Cookbooks were rare, with recipes handed down through the generations from mother to daughter. Life was arduous for a mother trying to feed her family in a fifth-floor tenement with no running water. But from the different cultures and religions of our immigrant ancestors, we have inherited a rich, diverse table of food.
Recommended by Tracey T., Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In 97 Orchard, Jane Ziegelman explores the culinary life that was the heart and soul of New York's Lower East Side around the turn of the twentieth century-a city within a city, where Germans, Irish, Italians, and Eastern European Jews attempted to forge a new life. Through the experiences of five families, all of them residents of 97 Orchard Street, she takes readers on a vivid and unforgettable tour, from impossibly cramped tenement apartments down dimly lit stairwells where children played and neighbors socialized, beyond the front stoops where immigrant housewives found respite and company, and out into the hubbub of the dirty, teeming streets. Ziegelman shows how immigrant cooks brought their ingenuity to the daily task of feeding their families, preserving traditions from home but always ready to improvise. While health officials worried that pushcarts were unsanitary and that pickles made immigrants too excitable to be good citizens, a culinary revolution was taking place in the streets of what had been culturally an English city. Along the East River, German immigrants founded breweries, dispensing their beloved lager in the dozens of beer gardens that opened along the Bowery. Russian Jews opened tea parlors serving blintzes and strudel next door to Romanian nightclubs that specialized in goose pastrami. On the streets, Italian peddlers hawked the cheese-and-tomato pies known as pizzarelli, while Jews sold knishes and squares of halvah. Gradually, as Americans began to explore the immigrant ghetto, they uncovered the array of comestible enticements of their foreign-born neighbors. 97 Orchard charts this exciting process of discovery as it lays bare the roots of our collective culinary heritage.

About the Author

"Jane Ziegelman brings us into the kitchens of five women whose home cooking not only fed their families and their neighborhoods but became part of the culinary DNA of America itself. Drawing on wonderfully evocative primary sources, Ziegelman describes how they contributed to the complexities of ethnic identity, class, and religion in a tumultuous city. Beautifully written and full of insights, 97 Orchard makes it clear that the story of New York is overwhelmingly a story about buying, selling, cooking, eating, and sharing food."---Laura Shafira, author of Perfection Salad: Women and Cooking at the Turn of the Century

Jane Ziegelman is the director of the forth-coming culinary program at New York City's Tenement Museum. The founder and director of Kids Cook!, a multiethnic cooking program for children, she has presented food-related talks and cooking classes in libraries and schools across New York City. Her writing on food has appeared in a number of newspapers, magazines, and books, including The New Cook's Catalog, and she is the coauthor of Foie Gras: A Passion. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Table of Contents

The Glockner family — The Moore family — The Gumpertz family — The Rogarshevsky family — The Baldizzi family.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780061997907
Subtitle:
An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement
Publisher:
Smithsonian Books/HarperCollins
Author:
Jane Ziegelman
Author:
Ziegelman, Jane
Subject:
United States - State & Local - General
Subject:
United States - State & Local - Middle Atlantic
Subject:
United States - 19th Century
Subject:
Social history
Subject:
Lower East Side (New York, N.Y.)
Subject:
Food habits - New York (State) - New York -
Subject:
United States - State & Local
Subject:
Cooking and Food-Food Writing
Subject:
World History-General
Subject:
Americana-General
Subject:
Cooking and Food-Historical Food and Cooking
Subject:
Americana -- New York
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20100601
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
253

Related Subjects

Cooking and Food » Reference and Etiquette » Historical Food and Cooking
History and Social Science » Americana » General
History and Social Science » Ethnic Studies » Immigration
History and Social Science » Sociology » Agriculture and Food
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » US History » 19th Century
History and Social Science » World History » General

97 Orchard: An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 253 pages Smithsonian Books/HarperCollins - English 9780061997907 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

I love looking at history through the telescope of a particular subject, in this case, the food of New York immigrants at the turn of the century. Not so very long ago, our hot dogs, bagels, and lasagna were exotic introductions to this country. Cookbooks were rare, with recipes handed down through the generations from mother to daughter. Life was arduous for a mother trying to feed her family in a fifth-floor tenement with no running water. But from the different cultures and religions of our immigrant ancestors, we have inherited a rich, diverse table of food.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.