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The Evolution of Useful Things: How Everyday artifacts-from Forks and Pins to Paper Clips and Zippers-Came to Be as They Are

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The Evolution of Useful Things: How Everyday artifacts-from Forks and Pins to Paper Clips and Zippers-Came to Be as They Are Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Only Henry Petroski, author of The Pencil, could make one never pick up a paper clip again without being overcome with feelings of awe and reverence. In his new book the author examines a host of techno-trivia questions - how the fork got its tines, why Scotch tape is called that, how the paper clip evolved, how the Post-it note came to be, how the zipper was named, why aluminum cans have hollow bottoms - and provides us with answers that both astonish and challenge the. In addition to an extended discussion of knives, forks, spoons, and other common devices, the author explains how the interplay of social and technical factors affects the development and use of such things as plastic bags, fast-food packaging, push-button telephones, and other modern conveniences. Throughout the book familiar objects serve to illustrate the general principles behind the evolution of all products of invention and engineering. Petroski shows by way of these examples as well as a probing look at the patent process, that the single most important driving force behind technological change is the failure of existing devices to live up to their promise. As shortcomings become evident and articulated, new and "improved" versions of artifacts come into being through long and involved processes variously known as research and development, invention, and engineering. He further demonstrates how the evolving forms of technology generally are altered by our very use of them, and how they, in turn, alter our social and cultural behavior.

Synopsis:

How did the table fork acquire a fourth tine? What advantage does the Phillips-head screw have over its single-grooved predecessor? Why does the paper clip look theway it does? What makes Scotch tape Scotch?

In this delightful book Henry, Petroski takes a microscopic look at artifacts that most of us count on but rarely contemplate, including such icons of the everyday as pins, Post-its, and fast-food clamshell containers. At the same time, he offers a convincing new theory of technological innovation as a response to the perceivedfailures of existing products--suggesting that irritation, and not necessity, is the mother of invention.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

Synopsis:

Petroski tells fascinating stories about the arduous processes that resulted in paper clips, Post-its, Phillips-head screwdrivers, Scotch tape, and fast-food "clamshell" containers. "Petroski . . . an examines the simplest . . . tools in our lives with an appraising eye."--Washington Post Book World. 45 illus.

About the Author

\Henry Petroski is the Aleksander S. Vesic Professor of Civil Engineering and Professor of History at Duke University. He is the author of more than ten books.

Table of Contents

1. How the fork got its tines — 2. Form follows failure — 3. Inventors as critics — 4. From pins to paper clips — 5. Little things can mean a lot — 6. Stick before zip — 7. Tools make tools — 8. Patterns of proliferation — 9. Domestic fashion and industrial design — 10. The power of precedent — 11. Closure before opening — 12. Big bucks from small change — 13. When good is better than best — 14. Always room for improvement.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307773050
Publisher:
Vintage Books
Subject:
Science : Experiments & Projects
Author:
Petroski, Henry
Subject:
Technology & Engineering : Industrial Design - Product
Subject:
Reference
Subject:
Inventions
Subject:
General
Subject:
Patents
Subject:
Experiments & Projects
Subject:
Engineering - General
Subject:
Art-Design History
Subject:
Desktop Publishing - General
Subject:
Engineering-General Engineering
Subject:
History of Science-Technology
Subject:
Science Reference-Experiments
Subject:
Science Reference-General
Subject:
World History-General
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
1992
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
288

Related Subjects

Engineering » Engineering » General Engineering
Engineering » Engineering » Inventions
History and Social Science » World History » General
Reference » Science Reference » Experiments
Reference » Science Reference » Technology

The Evolution of Useful Things: How Everyday artifacts-from Forks and Pins to Paper Clips and Zippers-Came to Be as They Are
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 288 pages Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group - English 9780307773050 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , How did the table fork acquire a fourth tine? What advantage does the Phillips-head screw have over its single-grooved predecessor? Why does the paper clip look theway it does? What makes Scotch tape Scotch?

In this delightful book Henry, Petroski takes a microscopic look at artifacts that most of us count on but rarely contemplate, including such icons of the everyday as pins, Post-its, and fast-food clamshell containers. At the same time, he offers a convincing new theory of technological innovation as a response to the perceivedfailures of existing products--suggesting that irritation, and not necessity, is the mother of invention.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

"Synopsis" by , Petroski tells fascinating stories about the arduous processes that resulted in paper clips, Post-its, Phillips-head screwdrivers, Scotch tape, and fast-food "clamshell" containers. "Petroski . . . an examines the simplest . . . tools in our lives with an appraising eye."--Washington Post Book World. 45 illus.
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