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Original Essays | September 18, 2014

Lin Enger: IMG Knowing vs. Knowing



On a hot July evening years ago, my Toyota Tercel overheated on a flat stretch of highway north of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. A steam geyser shot up from... Continue »
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    The High Divide

    Lin Enger 9781616203757

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Officer Friendly and Other Stories

Officer Friendly and Other Stories Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Diver

Peter walked into the store in his wet bathing suit. He'd never been to Point Allison before — it was on the western edge of that remote, depressed part of Maine that didn't get much traffic. There was no one by the cash register, no one in the grocery aisles, or in the small hardware section, or behind the sandwich counter. By the back windows, though, a man with a crew cut and a brown mustache sat on a bench drinking coffee.

"I'm wondering — excuse me, I'm sorry — I need a hand," said Peter. He could feel water from his suit rolling down his legs.

"You've been out swimming," said the man.

"Can you help me?" asked Peter.

"Damn cold, isn't it?"

"Well, it's just — my wife is out there in the boat, with our baby, and we're tangled up. The propeller is all fouled."

"You need a diver," said the man.

"Exactly," said Peter.

"Tough day for it, Sunday," said the man. He had a long face with a square jaw; there was a frankness to his expression that Peter saw as vaguely canine — he looked like a spaniel.

"Divers don't work on Sunday?"

"I don't know one who does."

"Could you give me a name? I could call him and ask."

"What's your question?"

"I don't really know what to do. I have a baby out there, and my wife — she's scared." In fact, Peter was the one who'd been alarmed; Margaret was fine. Most likely she was reading her book.

"Get a price ready," said the man. "Know your price. That's what he'll be looking for." "Price? I have no idea. Twenty-five bucks?"

"Fifty, minimum."

"Can you give me a name?" asked Peter.

"Why'd you swim in?" the man asked.

"We were stranded out there," said Peter.

"Don't have a rowboat?"

"Theline came loose today. We were towing one, but we didn't notice when it came loose. I guess we lost it in the channel."

"You sure the propeller is fouled?"

"There's a huge tangle of rope around it. I saw it. I swam down."

"I know a diver."

"Could you give me his number?"

"I know a number," said the man. "What's your price?"

Peter removed a soggy mass of bills from the pocket of his bathing suit. "Well, there's sixty. My wife might have more."

"That should be fine," said the man.

"Is there a phone here?"

"I'll do it. I'll dive."

"You're a diver?"

"Not on Sundays."

Peter smiled meekly. "Could you do it, though?"

"Well, it is a Sunday, friend." He sipped his coffee, then rolled the cup back and forth in his palms.

"More than sixty?"

"Just pulling your leg," said the man. "I'll do it for fifty."

They walked side by side down the hill to the town wharf. Blackberry bushes taller than Peter flanked the dirt road. The air was clear enough to see the Matinicus Lighthouse in the far distance. At lunchtime, Peter and Margaret had sailed past the lighthouse, which was set on a small rock outcrop, five miles away from any island. Two puffins had swirled around their mast, then flown back toward the rocks, landing in the surf. It had been warm, and the baby was sleeping in the cabin below. Margaret mentioned her desire to be a lighthouse keeper; she said it was the most romantic job in the world. Peter said it would be boring and lonely and cold — it would make you go crazy. Plus, he said, all lighthouses are run automatically these days. "You're lots of fun," she said. They headed closer to the wind, tightened the sails, and as Peter steered the boat,Margaret knelt on a seat cushion and pulled off Peter's suit. "Now we're talking," Peter said. He thought of God. He thought about heaven, about dying and living forever in the clouds.

Theirs was a good marriage. They had similar interests: sailing and food and local politics and camping. They rarely disagreed. Peter felt happy and content; Margaret had long brown hair and light blue eyes; she had an athletic figure and a graceful way of carrying herself. The restaurant turned a decent enough profit and it kept their lives full. He felt close to her when they made love. There was always a part of him, though, that remained well insulated, entirely separate. This was not by plan; when she knelt there in the cockpit, for example, he looked at the top of her head, gazed out to sea, and he felt exalted but alone. He would hug her afterwards, and she smiled and kissed him. This is fine, he assured himself. It's great.

Sunlight slanted across Point Allison, catching the sides of the dozen or so lobster boats all pointed in the same direction, with their glossy hulls and radar cylinders. Peter's small sailboat faced the other way.

"I wonder which boat is yours," said the diver. "Might it be that yacht, friend?"

"That's it," said Peter. "Not much of a yacht, really."

"Bet you got cocktails out there, though."

"Sure."

"You're a lawyer?"

"No."

"Doctor?"

"We run a restaurant. We live here."

"Here?"

"In Portland."

"That's not quite here, friend," said the diver.

The diver kept his equipment in a box on the public wharf, hidden under the walkway. He stripped down to his briefs, then stepped into the neoprene suit. He was stocky; maybe he'd been a high-schoolfootball player. He smelled of tobacco and mildew and sharp, sour sweat. Peter saw himself in the diver's eyes: wearing a bright blue and yellow swimming suit, getting his propeller wound up in lines. A yachting jackass.

"You know what it looks like down there?" asked the diver.

"Not really," said Peter.

"Imagine the thickest fog you've ever seen," he said. "But it's brown." "Polluted?"

"No, just mud. It's clean around here. Lobstermen, purse seiners, draggers, mussel farms." He grinned. "But you know what they say."

Peter shook his head.

"Clean water makes for dirty minds, and dirty minds make for lively winters," said the diver. "Or something like that." He laughed with shiny white teeth.

"Many fish down there?" asked Peter. Once he'd said it, it seemed like just the kind of question a jackass yachtsman would ask.

The diver pulled the wet suit hood down over his head and zipped the jacket. "Plenty. They're hard to see, though. They sneak up on you. You know what a sculpin looks like? They come out of nowhere. They're covered in sharp spines with big bulging eyes and huge rubbery mouths." He opened his eyes wide and stuck out his lower lip, then laughed at himself. His neck strained; it was broad and muscular.

"You must see lobsters down there, too."

"Oh, they're like cockroaches. They're everywhere. And they eat anything, garbage and dead fish. They eat their brothers, too, like cannibals." He smiled and strapped a knife to his leg.

"What's that for?" asked Peter.

"Say you get your hoses tangled in kelp. Or a shark comes at you." The diver took the knife out of its sheath and wiped off the blade, then, to test its sharpness, scraped it on his palm.

"Shark?"

"Come on, friend," said the diver. "Joke."

"Oh," said Peter. "Right."

"The seals here bite, though."

"Seals?"

"Jesus, you're gullible. Where'd you say you're from again?"

"We live in Portland."

"Where's that?" asked the diver.

Peter looked at him. Then he forced out a laugh.

"You almost thought I was that dumb," said the diver. "I'm pretty dumb, but I know where Portland is. I may not run a fancy restaurant, but I know where the city is, friend." He attached the hoses to his tank, then hefted it all to his back and clipped himself in. "Grab me those flippers, will you?"

Peter grabbed them and handed them to the diver. "You're my diving buddy, friend," the diver said. "Don't let

Synopsis:

The stories in this sparkling debut collection all take place in the state of Maine — which, in the hands of this madly talented young writer, quickly comes to stand for the state we're all in when we face the moments that change our lives forever. Two young hooligans have to decide whether to help the cop who has a heart attack while he's chasing them, or to cut and run. A young man at a party of coastal aristocrats has to deal with the surreal request to put a rich old coot out of his misery. Is a son going to abet his truck-driver father's art larceny or not? Should an amateur fighter take on the archetypal tough guy? Can the young father defend his family if the diver helping to free the tangled propeller of their boat turns out to be a real threat?

With humor, edginess, an eye for human idiosyncrasy, and a nice relish for menace, Lewis Robinson shows us the lives of the wealthy and poor, the delinquent and romantic, and the socalled ordinary — in transition, at turning points, and always with universal implications. These stories are at once classic and modern, complex and accessible, and, taken together, they bring the good news that a significant, compassionate new voice in American fiction has arrived.

Synopsis:

Two young hooligans play pranks on a police officer who suffers a heart attack during the chase. A young man is called upon to put a rich old coot out of his misery at a birthday party. A couple of rough prep-school hockey players are thrown off the school team and have to join the Drama Club. All these narratives, at once perfectly classic and utterly modern, show what happens when everyday life takes a strange twist, and they turn an unflinching gaze on the rough complications of friendship.

One by one, these stories are both entertaining and psychologically complex and astute. As a whole, they reveal how danger can erupt from everyday circumstance. In exploring the vulnerability of the outsider and the trickiness of friendship, this collection demonstrates what it means to stand at a crossroads and how and why we change direction, or just keep going.

About the Author

Lewis Robinson was born in Natick, Massachusetts, and grew up in Maine. He attended Middlebury College and the Iowa Writers' Workshop, where he was a teaching-writing fellow and winner of the Glenn Schaeffer Award. He has written for Sports Illustrated and the Boston Globe, and has had day jobs ranging from fire warden to crab slaughterer. He lives in Portland, Maine.

Table of Contents

The driver — Officer Friendly — The edge of the forest and the edge of the ocean — The toast — Ride — Fighting at night — Eiders — Cuxabexis, Cuxabexis — Puckheads — Seeing the world — Finches.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060513689
Author:
Robinson, Lewis
Publisher:
Harper
Location:
New York
Subject:
General
Subject:
Social life and customs
Subject:
Short Stories (single author)
Subject:
Short stories
Subject:
Maine
Subject:
General Fiction
Edition Number:
1st ed.
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Series Volume:
107-176
Publication Date:
20030107
Binding:
Hardback
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
8.63x5.83x.90 in. .85 lbs.

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Officer Friendly and Other Stories
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Product details 240 pages HarperCollins Publishers - English 9780060513689 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The stories in this sparkling debut collection all take place in the state of Maine — which, in the hands of this madly talented young writer, quickly comes to stand for the state we're all in when we face the moments that change our lives forever. Two young hooligans have to decide whether to help the cop who has a heart attack while he's chasing them, or to cut and run. A young man at a party of coastal aristocrats has to deal with the surreal request to put a rich old coot out of his misery. Is a son going to abet his truck-driver father's art larceny or not? Should an amateur fighter take on the archetypal tough guy? Can the young father defend his family if the diver helping to free the tangled propeller of their boat turns out to be a real threat?

With humor, edginess, an eye for human idiosyncrasy, and a nice relish for menace, Lewis Robinson shows us the lives of the wealthy and poor, the delinquent and romantic, and the socalled ordinary — in transition, at turning points, and always with universal implications. These stories are at once classic and modern, complex and accessible, and, taken together, they bring the good news that a significant, compassionate new voice in American fiction has arrived.

"Synopsis" by , Two young hooligans play pranks on a police officer who suffers a heart attack during the chase. A young man is called upon to put a rich old coot out of his misery at a birthday party. A couple of rough prep-school hockey players are thrown off the school team and have to join the Drama Club. All these narratives, at once perfectly classic and utterly modern, show what happens when everyday life takes a strange twist, and they turn an unflinching gaze on the rough complications of friendship.

One by one, these stories are both entertaining and psychologically complex and astute. As a whole, they reveal how danger can erupt from everyday circumstance. In exploring the vulnerability of the outsider and the trickiness of friendship, this collection demonstrates what it means to stand at a crossroads and how and why we change direction, or just keep going.

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