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Lapham Rising

by

Lapham Rising Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"A reasonable reader might protest the degree to which the book bludgeons one with a single message ('consumerism is bad'). And it would also be possible to quibble with Rosenblatt's decision to pillory Hamptonites (a sport utterly indistinguishable from shooting fish in a barrel). But the far simpler choice would be just to read the novel and enjoy a few good belly laughs along the way. Rosenblatt is exceedingly clever and he knows the world whereof he writes. So readers will be best advised to allow March to be the martyr — and sit back and enjoy the show." Marjorie Kehe, Christian Science Monitor (read the entire Christian Science Monitor review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Harry March's troubles begin when Lapham, a self-aggrandizing, ostentatious multimillionaire, commences construction of a 36,000-square-foot house (complete with a cutting-edge air-conditioner that cools his entire eight-acre property) directly across the creek from Harry's island home in Quogue, in the Hamptons. Harry, an island himself, is something of a wreck and half-nuts, but principled. His wife has left him for an event planner in Beverly Hills; he cuts the polo player out of his shirts; and he speaks mainly with his dog, Hector, a born-again Evangelical and a capitalist who admires Lapham's monstrosity as a symbol of American progress. But to Harry, Lapham represents everything that is ruining modern civilization. So he sends daily notes to his nemesis by way of a remote-control toy motorboat, which read: "Mr. Lapham, tear down that house!" When his efforts fail, he turns to politics by other means.]

Lapham Rising follows Harry's progress during a single day — through the strange habits of Hamptons social life; the power of local real estate (embodied in Kathy Polite, who advertises her agency by swimming naked from her boat every morning); the odd workings of his own mind, such as it is; and into his elaborate plot to devise a weapon of individual destruction with which to bring down Lapham and all the Laphams of the world. Of course, it backfires.

Review:

"The yahoos take the Hamptons in the barbed first novel from the Time and PBS Newshour cultural critic Rosenblatt (The Rules of Aging), a wicked sendup of class relations on Long Island's East End. Harry March — a disgruntled novelist, misanthrope and recluse on a Quogue sandbar he calls Noman ('Noman is an island') — has only his little cottage and his West Highland terrier Hector to call his own: his wife has left; his three children are grown. Three generations of Harry's family are rooted in town as noble-thinking doctors and teachers, so perhaps he has his history, too, but that history, and Harry's whole quietly seething existence, are under attack by the noisy erection of the arriviste's bells-and-whistles mansion across the water. Lapham (as in Silas, not Lewis) has new money that originates in asparagus tongs. His Quogue invasion, undertaken along with sexy Southern real estate agent Kathy Polite (rhymes with 'elite'), sparks Harry's very active critical mind to action, and he quickly plans fiery vengeance. Rosenblatt thumps his familiar socialist themes and is quotably tongue-in-cheek: there's a restaurant in town called Writer's Crock; in his catalogue of Lapham's objets is a chandelier left over from Kristallnacht. This satisfyingly old-school stab at the Hamptons' debasement will have New Yorker readers laughing out loud, even as it sends them up, too." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"If you know only his sententious essays on 'The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer,' then the idea of Roger Rosenblatt writing a comic novel sounds as promising as Henry Kissinger doing ballet. In fact, Rosenblatt turns out to be a very funny man. His friends probably know this already, as do readers of 'Rules for Aging' (2000), a humor book so burdened by the author's solemn reputation that its subtitle pleaded... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Synopsis:

Harry March's troubles begin when Lapham, a self-aggrandizing, ostentatious multimillionaire, commences construction of a 36,000-square-foot house (complete with a cutting-edge air-conditioner that cools his entire eight-acre property) directly across the creek from Harry's island home in Quogue, in the Hamptons. Harry, an island himself, is something of a wreck and half-nuts, but principled. His wife has left him for an event planner in Beverly Hills; he cuts the polo player out of his shirts; and he speaks mainly with his dog, Hector, a born-again Evangelical and a capitalist who admires Lapham's monstrosity as a symbol of American progress. But to Harry, Lapham represents everything that is ruining modern civilization. So he sends daily notes to his nemesis by way of a remote-control toy motorboat, which read: Mr. Lapham, tear down that house! When his efforts fail, he turns to politics by other means.

Lapham Rising follows Harry's progress during a single day — through the strange habits of Hamptons social life; the power of local real estate (embodied in Kathy Polite, who advertises her agency by swimming naked from her boat every morning); the odd workings of his own mind, such as it is; and into his elaborate plot to devise a weapon of individual destruction with which to bring down Lapham and all the Laphams of the world. Of course, it backfires.

Synopsis:

A recluse living on his own island in a creek across from the relentlessly noisy construction of a house belonging to a millionaire, reveals his life: his elaborate plot against the millionaire, the various odd visitors to his island, and his talking dog.

About the Author

Roger Rosenblatt’s contributions to Time and PBS have won two George Polk Awards, a Peabody, and an Emmy. He is the author of five Off-Broadway plays and twelve books, including the national bestseller Rules for Aging and Children of War, which won the Robert F. Kennedy Book Prize and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Lapham Rising, also a national bestseller, was his first novel.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780060833619
Subtitle:
A Novel
Author:
Rosenblatt, Roger
Author:
by Roger Rosenblatt
Author:
Miosz, Czesaw
Publisher:
Ecco
Subject:
General
Subject:
Humorous
Subject:
Hamptons (N.Y.)
Subject:
Miosz, Czesaw
Subject:
General Fiction
Edition Description:
Hardcover
Publication Date:
20060207
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
256
Dimensions:
7.32x5.90x.96 in. .73 lbs.

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Related Subjects

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Lapham Rising Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$0.95 In Stock
Product details 256 pages Ecco - English 9780060833619 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The yahoos take the Hamptons in the barbed first novel from the Time and PBS Newshour cultural critic Rosenblatt (The Rules of Aging), a wicked sendup of class relations on Long Island's East End. Harry March — a disgruntled novelist, misanthrope and recluse on a Quogue sandbar he calls Noman ('Noman is an island') — has only his little cottage and his West Highland terrier Hector to call his own: his wife has left; his three children are grown. Three generations of Harry's family are rooted in town as noble-thinking doctors and teachers, so perhaps he has his history, too, but that history, and Harry's whole quietly seething existence, are under attack by the noisy erection of the arriviste's bells-and-whistles mansion across the water. Lapham (as in Silas, not Lewis) has new money that originates in asparagus tongs. His Quogue invasion, undertaken along with sexy Southern real estate agent Kathy Polite (rhymes with 'elite'), sparks Harry's very active critical mind to action, and he quickly plans fiery vengeance. Rosenblatt thumps his familiar socialist themes and is quotably tongue-in-cheek: there's a restaurant in town called Writer's Crock; in his catalogue of Lapham's objets is a chandelier left over from Kristallnacht. This satisfyingly old-school stab at the Hamptons' debasement will have New Yorker readers laughing out loud, even as it sends them up, too." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review A Day" by , "A reasonable reader might protest the degree to which the book bludgeons one with a single message ('consumerism is bad'). And it would also be possible to quibble with Rosenblatt's decision to pillory Hamptonites (a sport utterly indistinguishable from shooting fish in a barrel). But the far simpler choice would be just to read the novel and enjoy a few good belly laughs along the way. Rosenblatt is exceedingly clever and he knows the world whereof he writes. So readers will be best advised to allow March to be the martyr — and sit back and enjoy the show." (read the entire Christian Science Monitor review)
"Synopsis" by , Harry March's troubles begin when Lapham, a self-aggrandizing, ostentatious multimillionaire, commences construction of a 36,000-square-foot house (complete with a cutting-edge air-conditioner that cools his entire eight-acre property) directly across the creek from Harry's island home in Quogue, in the Hamptons. Harry, an island himself, is something of a wreck and half-nuts, but principled. His wife has left him for an event planner in Beverly Hills; he cuts the polo player out of his shirts; and he speaks mainly with his dog, Hector, a born-again Evangelical and a capitalist who admires Lapham's monstrosity as a symbol of American progress. But to Harry, Lapham represents everything that is ruining modern civilization. So he sends daily notes to his nemesis by way of a remote-control toy motorboat, which read: Mr. Lapham, tear down that house! When his efforts fail, he turns to politics by other means.

Lapham Rising follows Harry's progress during a single day — through the strange habits of Hamptons social life; the power of local real estate (embodied in Kathy Polite, who advertises her agency by swimming naked from her boat every morning); the odd workings of his own mind, such as it is; and into his elaborate plot to devise a weapon of individual destruction with which to bring down Lapham and all the Laphams of the world. Of course, it backfires.

"Synopsis" by , A recluse living on his own island in a creek across from the relentlessly noisy construction of a house belonging to a millionaire, reveals his life: his elaborate plot against the millionaire, the various odd visitors to his island, and his talking dog.

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