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Paper Towns

by

Paper Towns Cover

ISBN13: 9780142414934
ISBN10: 014241493x
Condition: Standard
All Product Details

 

Staff Pick

Paper Towns starts with a dead man that two children find in the park and picks up speed from there. When his childhood best friend, Margo, goes AWOL, Quentin must put together some cryptic clues to find her. John Green has impressed me again with his natural wit and engaging story line.
Recommended by Blakelee M., Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Two-time Printz Medalist John Green's New York Times bestseller, now in paperback

Quentin Jacobsen has spent a lifetime loving the magnificently adventurous Margo Roth Spiegelman from afar. So when she cracks open a window and climbs back into his life — dressed like a ninja and summoning him for an ingenious campaign of revenge — he follows. After their all-nighter ends, and a new day breaks, Q arrives at school to discover that Margo, always an enigma, has now become a mystery. But Q soon learns that there are clues — and they're for him. Urged down a disconnected path, the closer he gets, the less Q sees the girl he thought he knew.

Review:

"Green melds elements from his Looking for Alaska and An Abundance of Katherines — the impossibly sophisticated but unattainable girl, and a life-altering road trip — for another teen-pleasing read. Weeks before graduating from their Orlando-area high school, Quentin Jacobsen's childhood best friend, Margo, reappears in his life, specifically at his window, commanding him to take her on an all-night, score-settling spree. Quentin has loved Margo from not so afar (she lives next door), years after she ditched him for a cooler crowd. Just as suddenly, she disappears again, and the plot's considerable tension derives from Quentin's mission to find out if she's run away or committed suicide. Margo's parents, inured to her extreme behavior, wash their hands, but Quentin thinks she's left him a clue in a highlighted volume of Leaves of Grass. Q's sidekick, Radar, editor of a Wikipedia-like Web site, provides the most intelligent thinking and fuels many hilarious exchanges with Q. The title, which refers to unbuilt subdivisions and "copyright trap" towns that appear on maps but don't exist, unintentionally underscores the novel's weakness: both milquetoast Q and self-absorbed Margo are types, not fully dimensional characters. Readers who can get past that will enjoy the edgy journey and off-road thinking. Ages 12-up." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"[Green is] clever and wonderfully witty...he's a superb stylist, with a voice perfectly matched to his amusing, illuminating material. (Starred review)" Booklist

Review:

"[D]eliciously intelligent dialogue and plenty of mind-twisting insights....a powerfully great read." VOYA

Review:

"Green knows what he does best and delivers once again with this satisfying, crowd-pleasing look at a complex, smart boy and the way he loves." Kirkus Reviews

Synopsis:

With his trademark brilliant wit and heart-stopping emotional honesty, the Printz Medal-winning author of Looking for Alaska returns with a novel about a teenage girl who has mysteriously vanished, and the boy who looks for her by following the clues she has left behind just for him.

Synopsis:

School of Rock meets World of Warcraft in this edgy, highly original YA novel of alternate realities, rock 'n' roll, time travel, and mythical characters, by DC Comics writer and Sci-Fi scribe, Robert Jeschonek, now available in paperback.

Synopsis:

Idea Deity believes that he exists in a novel written by an omnipotent author andthat he will die in chapter 64. Reacher Mirage sings lead in the undercover rock bandYouforia, a band that exists in Ideas world as an Internet hoax that Idea himself perpetuated.Beautiful and mysterious Eunice Truant links their destinies, and when theyall meet within the pages of the epic fantasy novel Fireskulls Revenant, the threat ofchapter 64 looms large.Being trapped in a bad book can be a nightmare—just ask Idea Deity.

Synopsis:

Anna—who prefers to be called Anastasia—is a spooky and complicated high school girl with a penchant for riddles, Houdini tricks, and ghost stories. She is unlike anyone the narrator has ever known, and they make an unlikely, though happy, pair. Then Anna disappears, leaving behind only a dress near a hole in the frozen river, and a string of unanswered questions. Desperate to find out what happened the narrator begins to reconstruct the past five months. And soon the fragments of curious events, intimate conversations, secrets, letters—and the anonymous messages that continue to arrive—coalesce into haunting and surprising revelations that may implicate friends, relatives, and even Anna herself.

About the Author

John Green lives in Indianapolis, Indiana.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 11 comments:

Melinda Ott, April 9, 2015 (view all comments by Melinda Ott)
It is no secret that John Green has a bit of a cult following--and it is easy to see why. He's a talented writer and he is tuned in to what young adults feel. He's not afraid to tackle tougher topics, but he also doesn't dumb things down for his audience. For that, I have great respect for him.

My first encounter with John Green came when I read The Fault In Our Stars, a book I greatly enjoyed. Since the movie version of Paper Towns is soon to be released, I decided that I would make this my 2nd Green read--so I can only compare it to The Fault In Our Stars.

I say this because, based on these two books, I get the feeling that John Green is a formulaic writer. Both books feature characters at a crossroads, which admittedly is not uncommon in Young Adult Fiction. They also feature scenes of property damage sprees and unbelievably understanding parents. Okay, that last part isn't necessarily a bad thing.

The fact that there is a framework may not bother many people. Let's face it, if it were a universal sin to be a formulaic writer, Dan Brown wouldn't have a prayer. Unfortunately, it does bother me. John Green is a very talented writer, but I really wish that he would get out of the box of his own making--at least I hope he does. I will most likely read more of his books in the future so, you know, it could happen. Heck, it may have already happened for all I know. But the fact that this book was so similar to the other one of his books that I read did negatively impact what I felt about this book.

However, let me address what I did like. I liked Quentin as a main character. I found him to be a believable narrator. He's an essentially good kid--a young man who is trusted by his parents, gets good grades, and has a good social circle. I enjoyed reading his interactions with his friends, who were the sort of people I knew in high school. Yet, putting him next to Margo highlights what a troubled young woman she is.

As I said, I am a fan of Green's writing--he is eloquent without being dramatically poetic. I think this is what makes him so appealing to young adults. Let's just say there is no shortage of quotable passages in this book. Yet, he is still able to capture the vernacular of high school students and weave it seamlessly into his prose.

Now, to my main problem with this book--and I have to admit that my own experiences greatly affected my feelings here--which is Margo Roth Spiegelman. You see, I knew a Margo when I was in high school--granted my Margo wasn't as clever as Green's Margo and she never led us on a cross country hunt (probably because it never occurred to her), but I know first hand how damaging someone like this can be. In many ways, Green romanticizes Margo and that just left a bad taste in my mouth. Margo is a very, very troubled person and that is never truly addressed. Quentin actually sacrifices quite a bit for her, yet he never really sees the cost of what he's done for her. In this respect, I found the book unsatisfying.

So, I'm torn on this. Was this a successful book for me? No. Would I recommend it to others? I don't know. I do think that the younger the reader, the more likely they are to enjoy this book. Yet, the farther the reader is from their own youth, the more likely they are to see the consequences of the characters' actions and behaviors and, as a result, the more likely they are to be dissatisfied with this story.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
Kayley, November 9, 2014 (view all comments by Kayley)
I must say that it is not my favorite book written by John Green it's still way better than most YA I've read. The characters are quirky yet believable and the plot is enticing, pulling you along with little whispers of Whitman's Song of Myself and Leaves of Grass and forcing you to think about how you see the people around you and how you connect with them. Quentin, and possibly John Green, ask you whether or not you can really know a person or if you will only ever know your own built up "idea" of them or some version of them that is just a projection of yourself.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
susanne.ranseen, October 24, 2014 (view all comments by susanne.ranseen)
I started reading John's books after being a long time nerdfighter and watcher of his video blog vlogbrothers. The first book of his I read was an abundance of Katharines which was truthfully kinda meh but I gave his books another try because of nerdfighteria. I feel in love with this book. I really loved how it looped around leaves of grass by Walt Whitman. on the surface the book is just about a boy oppressed with a girl he can never have and can't stop thinking about after one night of teenage antics. It has some pretty stander a teenager could have said that lines and some make you crack a smile lines. So for a quick read you will get a quick laugh. But if you take some time to actually enjoy the book and sink into the main character it really opens up. You discover much more than the surface layer just as with leaves of grass. On quick inspection the poem is morbid but on rereading and savoring it is hopeful much like life. The book is a non tome way to read a book about imaging people complexly which as a teenage or even as an adult can be hard. This book will not be for everyone John has a certain odd humor but if you give it a try I suspect you have a good chance of being happy with the end.
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(1 of 1 readers found this comment helpful)
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780142414934
Author:
Green, John
Publisher:
HMH Books for Young Readers
Author:
Galloway, Gregory
Author:
Jeschonek, Robert T.
Author:
Rosoff, Meg
Subject:
Love & Romance
Subject:
People & Places - United States
Subject:
Social Issues - Runaways
Subject:
Mysteries, Espionage, & Detective Stories
Subject:
Coming of age
Subject:
Revenge
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-Runaways
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Subject:
Mysteries & Detective Stories
Subject:
Action & Adventure
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20120417
Binding:
Electronic book text in proprietary or open standard format
Grade Level:
from 7
Language:
English
Pages:
336
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 in 1 lb
Age Level:
14-14

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Paper Towns Used Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$6.95 In Stock
Product details 336 pages Speak - English 9780142414934 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

Paper Towns starts with a dead man that two children find in the park and picks up speed from there. When his childhood best friend, Margo, goes AWOL, Quentin must put together some cryptic clues to find her. John Green has impressed me again with his natural wit and engaging story line.

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Green melds elements from his Looking for Alaska and An Abundance of Katherines — the impossibly sophisticated but unattainable girl, and a life-altering road trip — for another teen-pleasing read. Weeks before graduating from their Orlando-area high school, Quentin Jacobsen's childhood best friend, Margo, reappears in his life, specifically at his window, commanding him to take her on an all-night, score-settling spree. Quentin has loved Margo from not so afar (she lives next door), years after she ditched him for a cooler crowd. Just as suddenly, she disappears again, and the plot's considerable tension derives from Quentin's mission to find out if she's run away or committed suicide. Margo's parents, inured to her extreme behavior, wash their hands, but Quentin thinks she's left him a clue in a highlighted volume of Leaves of Grass. Q's sidekick, Radar, editor of a Wikipedia-like Web site, provides the most intelligent thinking and fuels many hilarious exchanges with Q. The title, which refers to unbuilt subdivisions and "copyright trap" towns that appear on maps but don't exist, unintentionally underscores the novel's weakness: both milquetoast Q and self-absorbed Margo are types, not fully dimensional characters. Readers who can get past that will enjoy the edgy journey and off-road thinking. Ages 12-up." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "[Green is] clever and wonderfully witty...he's a superb stylist, with a voice perfectly matched to his amusing, illuminating material. (Starred review)"
"Review" by , "[D]eliciously intelligent dialogue and plenty of mind-twisting insights....a powerfully great read."
"Review" by , "Green knows what he does best and delivers once again with this satisfying, crowd-pleasing look at a complex, smart boy and the way he loves."
"Synopsis" by , With his trademark brilliant wit and heart-stopping emotional honesty, the Printz Medal-winning author of Looking for Alaska returns with a novel about a teenage girl who has mysteriously vanished, and the boy who looks for her by following the clues she has left behind just for him.
"Synopsis" by ,
School of Rock meets World of Warcraft in this edgy, highly original YA novel of alternate realities, rock 'n' roll, time travel, and mythical characters, by DC Comics writer and Sci-Fi scribe, Robert Jeschonek, now available in paperback.
"Synopsis" by , Idea Deity believes that he exists in a novel written by an omnipotent author andthat he will die in chapter 64. Reacher Mirage sings lead in the undercover rock bandYouforia, a band that exists in Ideas world as an Internet hoax that Idea himself perpetuated.Beautiful and mysterious Eunice Truant links their destinies, and when theyall meet within the pages of the epic fantasy novel Fireskulls Revenant, the threat ofchapter 64 looms large.Being trapped in a bad book can be a nightmare—just ask Idea Deity.
"Synopsis" by ,
Anna—who prefers to be called Anastasia—is a spooky and complicated high school girl with a penchant for riddles, Houdini tricks, and ghost stories. She is unlike anyone the narrator has ever known, and they make an unlikely, though happy, pair. Then Anna disappears, leaving behind only a dress near a hole in the frozen river, and a string of unanswered questions. Desperate to find out what happened the narrator begins to reconstruct the past five months. And soon the fragments of curious events, intimate conversations, secrets, letters—and the anonymous messages that continue to arrive—coalesce into haunting and surprising revelations that may implicate friends, relatives, and even Anna herself.

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