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25 Local Warehouse Children's Young Adult- Social Issue Fiction
25 Remote Warehouse Children's Young Adult- Social Issue Fiction

Feathers

by

Feathers Cover

ISBN13: 9780142415504
ISBN10: 0142415502
All Product Details

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

A beautiful and moving novel from a three-time Newbery Honor-winning author

“Hope is the thing with feathers” starts the poem Frannie is reading in school. Frannie hasnt thought much about hope. There are so many other things to think about. Each day, her friend Samantha seems a bit more “holy.” There is a new boy in class everyone is calling the Jesus Boy. And although the new boy looks like a white kid, he says hes not white. Who is he?

During a winter full of surprises, good and bad, Frannie starts seeing a lot of things in a new light—her brother Seans deafness, her mothers fear, the class bullys anger, her best friends faith and her own desire for “the thing with feathers.”

Jacqueline Woodson once again takes readers on a journey into a young girls heart and reveals the pain and the joy of learning to look beneath the surface.

A Newbery Honor Book

Synopsis:

In her Newbery Honor-winning novel, Woodson takes readers on a journey into a young girl's heart and reveals the pain and joy of learning to look beneath the surface.

Synopsis:

These classic, award-winning novels by three-time Newbery Honor winner Jacqueline Woodson are now available with fresh new looks.

Synopsis:

Margaret McMullan, the acclaimed author of How I Found the Strong, and When I Crossed No-Bob, delivers a masterfully crafted novel about photography, tragedy, romance, racism, and family set in the segregated South during the civil rights movement.

Synopsis:

It's 1962, a year after the death of Sam's father--he was a war hero--and Sam and her mother must move, along with their very liberal views, to Jackson, Mississippi, her father's conservative hometown. Needless to say, they don't quite fit in.

    People like the McLemores fear that Sam, her mother, and her mother's artist friend, Perry, are in the South to "agitate" and to shake up the dividing lines between black and white and blur it all to grey. As racial injustices ensue--sit-ins and run-ins with secret white supremacists--Sam learns to focus with her camera lens to bring forth the social injustice out of the darkness and into the light.

Synopsis:

Nobody knows what to make of the new boy in Frannieas class. Not only does he look different, but heas kind to everyone, he refuses to fight, and he doesnat even seem to mind when the other kids nickname him Jesus Boy. But as winter progresses, Frannie realizes that sheas starting to see a whole lot of things in a new light: her brotheras deafness, her motheras fear, her friend Samanthaas faith, their classmate Trevoras anger, and her own desire for hopeaathe thing with feathers.a And itas all because of Jesus Boyas differences . . . and his friendship.

About the Author

Born on February 12th in Columbus, Ohio, Jacqueline Woodson grew up in Greenville, South Carolina, and Brooklyn, New York and graduated from college with a B.A. in English. She now writes full-time and has recently received the Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults. Her other awards include a Newbery Honor, two Coretta Scott King awards, two National Book Award finalists, and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Although she spends most of her time writing, Woodson also enjoys reading the works of emerging writers and encouraging young people to write, spending time with her friends and her family, and sewing. Jacqueline Woodson currently resides in Brooklyn, New York.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

grrlpup, April 13, 2012 (view all comments by grrlpup)
Jacqueline Woodson's books for kids and young adults are firmly in the "literary fiction" genre. Characters and relationships take center stage, without a lot of plot twists or tightly wound suspense. Some of the descriptions are lovely, and evoke exactly what it's like to be a kid, seeing everything a little closer up and at a little different speed than the adult world. But the narration can get over-poetic, and doesn't fit well in the mouth of even the most contemplative sixth-grader.

As an adult, non-religious reader, I didn't find this book as magical or interesting as some of her others (After Tupac and D Foster, for example, I loved). Its biggest weakness for me was that the characters had to talk everything over. For every incident in the plot, the narrator and sometimes one or two other characters would muse on what it meant about the nature of Jesus, or how another character felt about what was happening, or a connection with an event in someone's past or an Emily Dickinson poem. I think the book would be a lot stronger if images and events stood on their own, without the poetic commentary.

The main character, Franny, has a Deaf brother, and I liked her descriptions of ASL as they sign together. His interactions in his family and community were one of the most interesting parts of the story for me. The 1972 setting wasn't overdone, but I did wonder about a transracial adoption that's key to the story-- it seems like it would have been very rare for two people of color to adopt a non-disabled white boy at the age of three. I wanted to hear more about that, but we never did.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780142415504
Author:
Woodson, Jacqueline
Publisher:
Speak
Author:
McMullan, Margaret
Subject:
Social Issues - Friendship
Subject:
Family - General
Subject:
Religion
Subject:
Race relations
Subject:
Situations / Friendship
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction-Friendship
Subject:
Children s Young Adult-Social Issue Fiction
Subject:
Situations / Emotions & Feelings
Subject:
photography;racism;tragedy;coming of age;romance;family;teen fiction;civil right
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20100131
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 7 up to AND UP
Language:
English
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
7 x 5 x 0.58 in 0.4 lb
Age Level:
08-12

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Related Subjects

Children's » Awards » Newbery Award Winners
Children's » General
Children's » Middle Readers » General
Young Adult » Fiction » Newbery Award Winners
Young Adult » Fiction » Social Issues » Friendship

Feathers New Trade Paper
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$7.99 In Stock
Product details 240 pages Speak - English 9780142415504 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In her Newbery Honor-winning novel, Woodson takes readers on a journey into a young girl's heart and reveals the pain and joy of learning to look beneath the surface.
"Synopsis" by , These classic, award-winning novels by three-time Newbery Honor winner Jacqueline Woodson are now available with fresh new looks.
"Synopsis" by , Margaret McMullan, the acclaimed author of How I Found the Strong, and When I Crossed No-Bob, delivers a masterfully crafted novel about photography, tragedy, romance, racism, and family set in the segregated South during the civil rights movement.
"Synopsis" by , It's 1962, a year after the death of Sam's father--he was a war hero--and Sam and her mother must move, along with their very liberal views, to Jackson, Mississippi, her father's conservative hometown. Needless to say, they don't quite fit in.

    People like the McLemores fear that Sam, her mother, and her mother's artist friend, Perry, are in the South to "agitate" and to shake up the dividing lines between black and white and blur it all to grey. As racial injustices ensue--sit-ins and run-ins with secret white supremacists--Sam learns to focus with her camera lens to bring forth the social injustice out of the darkness and into the light.

"Synopsis" by , Nobody knows what to make of the new boy in Frannieas class. Not only does he look different, but heas kind to everyone, he refuses to fight, and he doesnat even seem to mind when the other kids nickname him Jesus Boy. But as winter progresses, Frannie realizes that sheas starting to see a whole lot of things in a new light: her brotheras deafness, her motheras fear, her friend Samanthaas faith, their classmate Trevoras anger, and her own desire for hopeaathe thing with feathers.a And itas all because of Jesus Boyas differences . . . and his friendship.
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