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1 Beaverton Reference- Grammar and Style

Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies: A Guide to Language for Fun and Spite

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Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies: A Guide to Language for Fun and Spite Cover

ISBN13: 9780143036838
ISBN10: 0143036831
Condition: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

What do suicidal pandas, doped-up rock stars, and a naked Pamela Anderson have in common? They?re all a heck of a lot more interesting than reading about predicate nominatives and hyphens. June Casagrande knows this and has invented a whole new twist on the grammar book. Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies is a laugh-out-loud funny collection of anecdotes and essays on grammar and punctuation, as well as hilarious critiques of the self-appointed language experts.

Chapters include:

  • I'm Writing This While Naked — The Oh-So Steamy Predicate Nominative
  • Semicolonoscopy — Colons, Semicolons, Dashes, and Other Probing Annoyances
  • I'll Take "I Feel Like a Moron" for $200, Alex — When to Put Punctuation Inside Quotation Marks
  • Snobbery Up with Which You Should Not Put Up — Prepositions
  • Is That a Dangler in Your Memo or Are You Just Glad to See Me?
  • Hyphens — Life-Sucking, Mom-and-Apple-Pie-Hating, Mime-Loving, Nerd-Fight-Inciting Daggers of the Damned
Casagrande delivers practical and fun language lessons not found anywhere else, demystifying the subject and taking it back from the snobs. In short, it's a grammar book people will actually want to read — just for the fun of it.

Review:

"Hoping to make grammar both accessible and amusing, Casagrande offers practical and entertaining lessons on common uses and unfortunate abuses of the English language. The author, a southern California newspaper columnist, memorably delineates 'who' and 'whom'; 'can' and 'may'; 'affect' and 'effect'; and provides pithy primers on the perennially problematic dark alleys of language (subjunctives, how to use punctuation marks around quoted material, possessive gerunds). In brief, cleverly titled sections, she addresses a slew of grammar and punctuation questions: 'To Boldly Blow' examines the issue of split infinitives, 'Snobbery Up With Which You Should Not Put' tackles prepositions and 'Is That a Dangler in Your Memo or Are You Just Glad to See Me?' pokes fun at dangling modifiers and the confusion they create. By also touching on e-mail and text messaging, where traditional rules are commonly ignored, Casagrande keeps the discussion current. She maintains her sass and her sense of humor throughout, at one point calling the hyphen 'a nasty, tricky, evil little mark that gets its kicks igniting arguments...the Bill Maher of punctuation.' Readers intimidated by style manuals and Lynne Truss will enjoy this populist grammar reference." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"This lively book with humorous essays is a sure winner." Children's Literature

Review:

"Both sassy and edifying, Casagrande's little tome will be especially useful to those in search of basic grammar instruction." Booklist

Synopsis:

The antidote to Eats, Shoots and Leaves is an uproarious and very American word book for those who are tired of getting pulled over by the grammar police.

Synopsis:

What do suicidal pandas, doped-up rock stars, and a naked Pamela Anderson have in common? They’re all a heck of a lot more interesting than reading about predicate nominatives and hyphens. June Casagrande knows this and has invented a whole new twist on the grammar book. Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies is a laugh-out-loud funny collection of anecdotes and essays on grammar and punctuation, as well as hilarious critiques of the self-appointed language experts.

Chapters include:

  • I’m Writing This While Naked—The Oh-So Steamy Predicate Nominative
  • Semicolonoscopy—Colons, Semicolons, Dashes, and Other Probing Annoyances
  • I’ll Take "I Feel Like a Moron" for $200, Alex—When to Put Punctuation Inside Quotation Marks
  • Snobbery Up with Which You Should Not Put Up—Prepositions
  • Is That a Dangler in Your Memo or Are You Just Glad to See Me?
  • Hyphens—Life-Sucking, Mom-and-Apple-Pie-Hating, Mime-Loving, Nerd-Fight-Inciting Daggers of the Damned

Casagrande delivers practical and fun language lessons not found anywhere else, demystifying the subject and taking it back from the snobs. In short, it’s a grammar book people will actually want to read—just for the fun of it.

About the Author

June Casagrande writes the popular and very humorous "A Word, Please" grammar column for four Los Angeles Times community newspapers. She has written over 900 articles for various newspapers and magazines and has four years of improvisational comedy training.

Table of Contents

Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies Introduction: Grammar Snobs Make Good Prison Brides

1. A Snob For All Seasons—Shared Possessives

2. For Whom The Snob Trolls—"Who"/"Whom" and Why You're Right Not to Care

3. Passing The Simpsons Test— It's "Till," Not "Til"

4. To Boldly Blow—Only Windbags Fuss over Split Infinitives

5. The Sexy Mistake—"To Lay" versus "To Lie"

6. Snobbery Up With Which You Should Not Put—Prepositions

7. Is That A Dangler In Your Memo Or Are You Just Glad To See Me?

8. An Open Letter To Someone Who Knows I Once Tried To Be A Grammar Snob But Failed—"Dreamed" versus "Dreamt," "Preventive" versus "Preventative," and Similar Pairs

9. Anarchy Rules— "Adviser"/Advisor," "Titled"/"Entitled," and Other Ways to Be Right and Wrong at the Same Time

10. The Comma Denominator—Good News: No One Knows How to Use These Things

11. Semicolonoscopy—Colons, Semicolons, Dashes, Hyphens, and Other Probing Annoyances

12. The O.C.: Where The '80s Never Die—Lessons on the Apostrophe from Behind the Orange Curtain

13. Go Ahead, Make Up Your Own Words—Prefixes and Suffixes and Why the Dictionary Thinks You're Wrong

14. Hyphens: Life-Sucking, Mom-And-Apple-Pie-Hating, Mime-Loving, Nerd-Fight-Inciting Daggers Of The Damned

15. I'll Take "I Feel Like A Moron" For $200, Alex—When to Put Punctuation Inside Quotation Marks

16. A Chapter Dedicated To Those Other Delights Of Punctuation

17. Copulative Conjunctions: Hot Stuff For The Truly Desperate—Conjunctions to Know and Conjunctions That Blow

18. R U Uptite?—Shortcuts in the Digital Age and the Meanies Who Hate Them

19. Literally Schmiterally

20. How To Drop Out Of High School In The Ninth Grade And Still Make Big Bucks Telling People How To Use Good Grammar—"That" versus "Which"

21. Well, Well, Aren't You Good?—Adverbs Love Action

22. Fodder For Those Mothers—"Irregardless" and Other Slipups We Nonsnobs Can't Afford

23. I Wish I Were Batgirl—The Subjunctive Mood

24. Mommy's All Wrong, Daddy's All Wrong—The Truth about "Cans" and "Dones"

[25. The Kids Are All Wrong—"Alright," Dropping "The" Before "the The," Where to Put Your "Only," and Other Lessons from the World of Rock 'n' Roll

26. How To Impress Brad Pitt—"Affect" versus "Effect"

27. And You Too Can Begin Sentences With "And," "So," "But," And "Because"

28. Your Boss Is Not Jesus—Possessives and Words Ending in "S," "X," and "Z"

29. The Silence Of The Linguists—Double Possessives and Possessives with Gerunds

30. I'm Writing This While Naked—The Oh-So-Steamy Predicate Nominative

31. I Wish I May, I Wish I Might For Once In My Life Get This One Right—"May" versus "Might," "Different From" versus "Different Than," "Between" versus "Among," and Other Problematic Pairs

32. A Backyard Barbecue In The Back Yard, A Front-Yard Barbecue In The Front Yard—The Magical Moment When Two Words Become One

33. How To Never, Ever Offend Anyone With Inadvertently Sexist Or Racist Language

34. Complete Sentences? Optional!

35. It's/Its A Classroom Ditz—Or How I Learned to Stop Fuming and Love the Jerkwad

36. Eight, Nine, 10, 11—How to Write Numbers

37. If At First You Don't Irk A Snob, Try And Try Again—"Try To" versus "Try And"

38. Express Lane Of Pain—"Less Than" versus "Fewer Than"

39. Agree To Dis A Meanie—Subject-Verb Agreement, Conjugating Verbs for "None" and "Neither," and Other Agreement Issues

40. The Emperor's New Clause—Pronouns That Are Objects and Subjects, "Each Other" versus "One Another," and More Evidence That the "Experts" Aren't All They're Cracked Up to Be

41. Satan's Vocabulary

42. You Really Can Look It Up

Acknowledgments

Sources

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 3 comments:

kylebrittain, February 27, 2011 (view all comments by kylebrittain)
Grammar Snobs are Great Big Meanies is a decent introductory supplement for students of Standard American English grammar. The book’s casual approach makes it an ideal text for people who shudder at the thought of reading a grammar book. However, many of Ms. Casagrande’s explanations of grammar rules are oversimplified—she sometimes writes like she’s out of her element and it shows.

Ms. Casagrande writes a grammar column for a Los Angeles Times supplement. As a grammar columnist, she routinely faces challenges from the titular snobs. The book is both a response to the grammar snobs who have attacked Casagrande in the past and an instructive tool for burgeoning grammarians to defend themselves against the “big meanies” who lie in wait with red pens, ready to correct bad grammar wherever it can be found.
While the book functions better as a supplement than a main text (due to simplification of material), the prose is well written and frequently very funny. Plenty of pop-culture references pepper this easy-to-follow text; the subject matter is always engaging and approachable.

Despite the book’s flaws, I would recommend Grammar Snobs are Great Big Meanies to high school English students for use as a supplemental text as well as to adults who have learned Standard American English grammar but need a light and engaging refresher course.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(3 of 5 readers found this comment helpful)
David Ingrassia, March 8, 2008 (view all comments by David Ingrassia)
This book is simply written well. Casagrande could write on plumbing and I would line up at the bookseller's to purchase an advanced copy.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(5 of 9 readers found this comment helpful)
Shylah, March 1, 2008 (view all comments by Shylah)
An excellent primer for those who are intimidated by (or simply cannot grasp) traditional grammar manuals. Casagrande's humour and witticisms throughout the book make learning common grammar much easier, because it doesn't feel like such a chore. I recommend this book to anyone who struggles with dangling modifiers, misplaced semicolons, and excessive commas.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(6 of 10 readers found this comment helpful)
View all 3 comments

Product Details

ISBN:
9780143036838
Author:
Casagrande, June
Publisher:
Penguin Books
Subject:
General
Subject:
Grammar
Subject:
English language
Subject:
Usage
Subject:
Writing Skills
Subject:
Form - Anecdotes
Subject:
Form - Essays
Subject:
Grammar & Punctuation
Subject:
English language -- Usage.
Subject:
Reference-Grammar and Style
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Mass Market
Publication Date:
20060331
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
from 12
Language:
English
Pages:
224
Dimensions:
7.14x5.80x.59 in. .34 lbs.
Age Level:
from 18

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Anecdotes
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Anthologies
Reference » Grammar and Style
Reference » Grammar and Usage

Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies: A Guide to Language for Fun and Spite Used Trade Paper
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$7.95 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Penguin Books - English 9780143036838 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Hoping to make grammar both accessible and amusing, Casagrande offers practical and entertaining lessons on common uses and unfortunate abuses of the English language. The author, a southern California newspaper columnist, memorably delineates 'who' and 'whom'; 'can' and 'may'; 'affect' and 'effect'; and provides pithy primers on the perennially problematic dark alleys of language (subjunctives, how to use punctuation marks around quoted material, possessive gerunds). In brief, cleverly titled sections, she addresses a slew of grammar and punctuation questions: 'To Boldly Blow' examines the issue of split infinitives, 'Snobbery Up With Which You Should Not Put' tackles prepositions and 'Is That a Dangler in Your Memo or Are You Just Glad to See Me?' pokes fun at dangling modifiers and the confusion they create. By also touching on e-mail and text messaging, where traditional rules are commonly ignored, Casagrande keeps the discussion current. She maintains her sass and her sense of humor throughout, at one point calling the hyphen 'a nasty, tricky, evil little mark that gets its kicks igniting arguments...the Bill Maher of punctuation.' Readers intimidated by style manuals and Lynne Truss will enjoy this populist grammar reference." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "This lively book with humorous essays is a sure winner."
"Review" by , "Both sassy and edifying, Casagrande's little tome will be especially useful to those in search of basic grammar instruction."
"Synopsis" by , The antidote to Eats, Shoots and Leaves is an uproarious and very American word book for those who are tired of getting pulled over by the grammar police.
"Synopsis" by ,

What do suicidal pandas, doped-up rock stars, and a naked Pamela Anderson have in common? They’re all a heck of a lot more interesting than reading about predicate nominatives and hyphens. June Casagrande knows this and has invented a whole new twist on the grammar book. Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies is a laugh-out-loud funny collection of anecdotes and essays on grammar and punctuation, as well as hilarious critiques of the self-appointed language experts.

Chapters include:

  • I’m Writing This While Naked—The Oh-So Steamy Predicate Nominative
  • Semicolonoscopy—Colons, Semicolons, Dashes, and Other Probing Annoyances
  • I’ll Take "I Feel Like a Moron" for $200, Alex—When to Put Punctuation Inside Quotation Marks
  • Snobbery Up with Which You Should Not Put Up—Prepositions
  • Is That a Dangler in Your Memo or Are You Just Glad to See Me?
  • Hyphens—Life-Sucking, Mom-and-Apple-Pie-Hating, Mime-Loving, Nerd-Fight-Inciting Daggers of the Damned

Casagrande delivers practical and fun language lessons not found anywhere else, demystifying the subject and taking it back from the snobs. In short, it’s a grammar book people will actually want to read—just for the fun of it.

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