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Patterns of World History: Since 1750

by

Patterns of World History: Since 1750 Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Patterns of World History comes to the teaching of world history from the perspective of innovations the engine of historical change. Innovation is nothing new; so what we advocate in this book is a distinct intellectual framework for understanding innovation through its patterns of origin, interaction, and adaptation. Each small or large technical or cultural innovation originated in one geographical center, or independently in several different centers. As people in the centers interacted with their neighbors, the neighbors adapted to - and in many cases were transformed by - the innovations. By adaptation we include the entire spectrum of human responses, ranging from outright rejection to creative borrowing and, at times, forced acceptance.

What do we gain by studying world history as patterns of innovation? First, if we consider innovation to be a driving force of history, it helps satisfy an intrinsic human curiosity about origins-our own and others. Perhaps more importantly, seeing patterns of innovation in historical development brings to light connections and linkages among peoples, cultures, and regions that might not otherwise present themselves. At the same time such patterns can also reveal differences among cultures that other approaches to world history tend to neglect. For example, the differences between the civilizations of the Eastern and Western Hemispheres are generally highlighted in world history texts, but the broad commonalities of human groups creating agriculturally-based cities and states in widely separated areas also show deep parallels in their patterns of origins, interactions and adaptations: such comparisons are at the center of our approach.

Second, this kind of analysis offers insights into how an individual innovation was subsequently developed and diffused across space and time-that is, the patterns by which the new eventually becomes a necessity in our daily lives. Through all of this we gain a deeper appreciation of the unfolding of global history from its origins in small communities to the densely populated large countries in our present world.

Finally, our use of a broad-based understanding of innovation allows us to restore culture in all its individual and institutionalized aspects-spiritual, artistic, intellectual, scientific-to its rightful place alongside technology, environment, politics, and socio-economic conditions. That is, understanding innovation in this way allows this text to help illuminate the full range of human ingenuity over time and space in a comprehensive, evenhanded, and open-ended fashion.

Synopsis:

Patterns of World History offers a distinct framework for understanding the global past through the study of origins, interactions, and adaptations. Authors Peter von Sivers, Charles A. Desnoyers, and George Stow--each specialists in their respective fields--examine the full range of human ingenuity over time and space in a comprehensive, even-handed, and critical fashion.

The book helps students to see and understand patterns through: ORIGINS - INTERACTIONS - ADAPTATIONS

These key features show the O-I-A framework in action:

* Seeing Patterns, a list of key questions at the beginning of each chapter, focuses students on the 3-5 over-arching patterns, which are revisited, considered, and synthesized at the end of the chapter in Thinking Through Patterns.

* Each chapter includes a Patterns Up Close case study that brings into sharp relief the O-I-A pattern using a specific idea or thing that has developed in human history (and helped, in turn, develop human history), like the innovation of the Chinese writing system or religious syncretism in India. Each case study clearly shows how an innovation originated either in one geographical center or independently in several different centers. It demonstrates how, as people in the centers interacted with their neighbors, the neighbors adapted to--and in many cases were transformed by--the idea, object, or event. Adaptations include the entire spectrum of human responses, ranging from outright rejection to creative borrowing and, at times, forced acceptance.

* Concept Maps at the end of each chapter use compelling graphical representations of ideas and information to help students remember and relate the big patterns of the chapter.

About the Author

Peter von Sivers is Associate Professor of Middle Eastern History at the University of Utah. He has previously taught at UCLA, Northwestern University, University of Paris VII (Vincennes), and the University of Munich. He has also served as Chair, Joint Committee of the Near and Middle East, Social Science Research Council (SSRC), New York, 1982-1985, editor, International Journal of Middle East Studies (IJMES), 1985-89, member, Board of Directors, Middle East Studies Association of North America (MESA), 1987-90, and Chair, SAT II World History Test Development Committee of the Educational Testing Service (ETS), Princeton, NJ, 1991-1994. His publications include Caliphate, Kingdom, and Decline: The Political Theory of Ibn Khaldun, several edited books, and three-dozen peer-reviewed chapters and articles on Middle Eastern and North African history, as well as world history. He received his Dr. Phil. from the University of Munich.

Charles A. Desnoyers is Associate Professor of History and Director of Asian Studies at La Salle University, Philadelphia. He is also past Director of the Greater Philadelphia Asian Studies Consortium and President (2011-12) of the Mid-East Region Association for Asian Studies. His scholarly publications include A Journey to the East: Li Gui, 'A New Account of a Trip Around the Globe' (University of Michigan Press, 2004) and former coeditorship of the World History Association's Bulletin.

George B. Stow is Professor of History and Director of the Graduate Program in History at La Salle University, Philadelphia. His teaching experience embraces a variety of undergraduate and graduate courses in ancient Greece and Rome, medieval England, and world history, and for excellence in teaching he has been awarded the Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award. Professor Stow is a member of the Medieval Academy of America, and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. He is the recipient of a NDEA Title IV Fellowship, a Woodrow Wilson Foundation Fellowship, and research grants from the American Philosophical Society and La Salle University. His publications include a critical edition of a fourteenth-century monastic chronicle, Historia Vitae et Regni Ricardi Secundi (University of Pennsylvania Press), as well as numerous articles and reviews in scholarly journals including Speculum, The English Historical Review, the Journal of Medieval History, the American Historical Review, and several others. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois.

Table of Contents

Each chapter contains Patterns Up Close, Concept Maps, Putting it All Together, Review and Respond, and Further Resources.

Part 1: From Human Origins to Early Agricultural Centers, Prehistory-10,000 B.C.E.

1. The African Origins of Humanity, Prehistory to 10,000 B.C.E.

The Origins of Humanity

Hominins: No Longer Apes but not yet Human

Human Adaptations: From Africa to Eurasia and Australia

The African Origins of Human Culture

Migration from South Asia to Australia

Migration from South Asia to Europe

The Ice Age Crisis and Human Migration to the Americas

The Ice Age

2. Agrarian-Urban Centers of the Middle East and Eastern Mediterranean, 11,500-600 B.C.E

Agrarian Origins in the Fertile Crescent, c. 11,500-1,500 B.C.E

Sedentary Foragers and Foraging Farmers

The Origins of Urban Centers in Mesopotamia and Egypt

Kingdoms in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Crete

Interactions Among Multi-Ethnic and Multi-Religious Empires, c. 1500-600 B.C.E.

The Hittite and Assyrian Empires, 1600-600 B.C.E.

Small Kingdoms on the Imperial Margins, 1600-600 B.C.E.

Religious Experience and Cultural Achievements

3. Shifting Agrarian Centers in India, 3000-600 B.C.E.

The Vanished Origins of Harappa 3000 to 1500 B.C.E

The Region and People

Adapting to Urban Life in the Indus Valley

The Collapse of the Cities

Interactions in Northern India 1500 to 600 B.C.E.

The Vedic World, 1750 to 800 B.C.E.

Statecraft and the Ideology of Power, 800 to 600 B.C.E.

Indian Society, Culture, and Religion 1500 to 600 B.C.E.

Society and Family in Ancient India

Cultural Interactions to 600 B.C.E.

4. Agrarian Patterns and the Mandate of Heaven in Ancient China, 5000-481 B.C.E.

The Origins of Yellow River Cultures, 5000 to 1766 B.C.E.

Geography and Climate

The Origins of Neolithic Cultures

The Age of Myth and the Xia Dynasty, 2852 to 1766 B.C.E.

The Interactions of Shang and Zhou History and Politics, 1766 to 481 B.C.E.

The Shang Dynasty, 1766 to 1122 B.C.E.

The Mandate of Heaven: The Zhou Dynasty to 481 B.C.E.

Economy, Society, and Family Adaptation in Ancient China

Shang Society

Interactions of Zhou Economy and Society

Gender and the Family

Interactions of Religion, Culture, and Intellectual Life in Ancient China

Oracle Bones and Early Chinese Writing

Adaptations of Zhou Religion, Technology, and Culture

5. Origins Apart: The Americas and Oceania, 30,000-600 B.C.E.

The Americas: Hunters and Foragers 30,000 B.C.E. to 600 B.C.E.

The Environment

Human Migrations

Agriculture, Villages, and Urban Life

The Neolithic Revolution in the New World

The Origins of Urban Life

Foraging and Farming Societies outside the Andes and Mesoamerica

The Origins of Pacific Island Migrations 6000 to 600 B.C.E.

Lapita and Cultural Origins

Creating Polynesia

Part 2: The Age of Empires and Visionaries, 600 B.C.E. - 600 C.E.

6. Chiefdoms and Early States in Africa and the Americas, 600 B.C.E.-600 C.E.

Agriculture and Early African Kingdoms

Saharan Villages, Towns, and Kingdoms

The Kingdom of Aksum

The Spread of Villages in Sub-Saharan Africa

West African Savanna and Rainforest Agriculture

The Spread of Village Life to East and South Africa

Patterns of African History, 600 B.C.E.-600 C.E.

Early States in Mesoamerica: Maya Kingdoms and Teotihuacán

The Maya Kingdoms in Southern Mesoamerica

The Kingdom of Teotihuacán in the Mexican Basin

The Andes: Moche and Nazca

The Moche in Northern Peru

Paracas and the Nazca in Southern Peru

7. Persia, Greece, and Rome, 550 B.C.E.-600 C.E.

Interactions between Persia and Greece

The Origins of the Achaemenid Persian Empire

Greek City-States in the Persian Shadow

Alexander's Empire and Its Successor Kingdoms

Interactions Between the Persian and Roman Empires

Parthian Persia and Rome

The Sasanian Persian and Late Roman Empires

Adaptations to Monotheism in the Middle East

Challenge to Polytheism: The Origins of Judaism, Zoroastrianism, and Greek Philosophy

Toward Religious Communities and Philosophical Schools

The Beginnings of Science and the Cultures of Kings and Citizens

The Sciences at the Museum of Alexandria

Royal Persian Culture

Greek and Roman Civic Culture

8. Empires and Visionaries in India, 600 B.C.E.-600 C.E.

Patterns of State Formation in India: Republics, Kingdoms, and Empires

The Road to Empire: The Mauryas

The Classical

Product Details

ISBN:
9780195333343
Author:
Von Sivers, Peter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Author:
Sivers, Peter Von
Author:
Stow, George B.
Author:
Desnoyers, Charles A.
Author:
Desnoyers, Charles
Author:
Stow, George
Subject:
World
Subject:
History - World
Subject:
World History-General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20111231
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Language:
English
Pages:
448
Dimensions:
7.5 x 9.9 x 0.7 in 1.6 lb
Age Level:
The Gupta Empire <br>The Southern Kingdoms, ca. 30

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Western Civilization » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Textbooks » General

Patterns of World History: Since 1750 New Trade Paper
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Product details 448 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780195333343 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Patterns of World History offers a distinct framework for understanding the global past through the study of origins, interactions, and adaptations. Authors Peter von Sivers, Charles A. Desnoyers, and George Stow--each specialists in their respective fields--examine the full range of human ingenuity over time and space in a comprehensive, even-handed, and critical fashion.

The book helps students to see and understand patterns through: ORIGINS - INTERACTIONS - ADAPTATIONS

These key features show the O-I-A framework in action:

* Seeing Patterns, a list of key questions at the beginning of each chapter, focuses students on the 3-5 over-arching patterns, which are revisited, considered, and synthesized at the end of the chapter in Thinking Through Patterns.

* Each chapter includes a Patterns Up Close case study that brings into sharp relief the O-I-A pattern using a specific idea or thing that has developed in human history (and helped, in turn, develop human history), like the innovation of the Chinese writing system or religious syncretism in India. Each case study clearly shows how an innovation originated either in one geographical center or independently in several different centers. It demonstrates how, as people in the centers interacted with their neighbors, the neighbors adapted to--and in many cases were transformed by--the idea, object, or event. Adaptations include the entire spectrum of human responses, ranging from outright rejection to creative borrowing and, at times, forced acceptance.

* Concept Maps at the end of each chapter use compelling graphical representations of ideas and information to help students remember and relate the big patterns of the chapter.

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