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Bird on Fire: Lessons from the World's Least Sustainable City

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Bird on Fire: Lessons from the World's Least Sustainable City Cover

ISBN13: 9780199828265
ISBN10: 0199828261
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Phoenix, Arizona is one of America's fastest growing metropolitan regions. It is also its least sustainable one, sprawling over a thousand square miles, with a population of four and a half million, minimal rainfall, scorching heat, and an insatiable appetite for unrestrained growth and unrestricted property rights.

In Bird on Fire, eminent social and cultural analyst Andrew Ross focuses on the prospects for sustainability in Phoenix--a city in the bull's eye of global warming--and also the obstacles that stand in the way. Most authors writing on sustainable cities look at places like Portland, Seattle, and New York that have excellent public transit systems and relatively high density. But Ross contends that if we can't change the game in fast-growing, low-density cities like Phoenix, the whole movement has a major problem. Drawing on interviews with 200 influential residents--from state legislators, urban planners, developers, and green business advocates to civil rights champions, energy lobbyists, solar entrepreneurs, and community activists--Ross argues that if Phoenix is ever to become sustainable, it will occur more through political and social change than through technological fixes. Ross explains how Arizona's increasingly xenophobic immigration laws, science-denying legislature, and growth-at-all-costs business ethic have perpetuated social injustice and environmental degradation. But he also highlights the positive changes happening in Phoenix, in particular the Gila River Indian Community's successful struggle to win back its water rights, potentially shifting resources away from new housing developments to producing healthy local food for the people of the Phoenix Basin. Ross argues that this victory may serve as a new model for how green democracy can work, redressing the claims of those who have been aggrieved in a way that creates long-term benefits for all.

Bird on Fire offers a compelling take on one of the pressing issues of our time--finding pathways to sustainability at a time when governments are dismally failing their responsibility to address climate change.

Review:

"Ross (Fast Boat to China) examines the efforts toward and obstacles to sustainability for Phoenix, Ariz., a city dependent on imported water and driven by the boom-and-bust economy of land speculation. On the site of the Hohokam culture, which fizzled out in the 14th century when stressed by drought and floods, human devastation of the ecosystem, and inability to absorb an influx of immigrants, Phoenix seems eerily bent on repeating the mistakes of its predecessors. With an open eye and a progressive proclivity, Ross reveals fascinating inconsistencies and contradictions in the current push and pull between resilience and self-destruction: Matthew Moore, an artist-farmer, runs two farms, a 50-family CSA and an industrial agricultural operation. Artist-activists refashioning a vibrant, livable inner city 'thrilled advocates of the Creative City' — until the popular Friday artwalks became too creative and 'the police showed up en masse, and on horseback' to intimidate participants. African and Latino communities, both suffering from monstrous pollution thrust on low-income neighborhoods, have trouble joining forces because of long-term tensions between them. Ross's conclusion — that if sustainable urbanism is 'not directed by and toward principles of equity, then they will almost certainly end up reinforcing patterns of eco-apartheid' — is a bracing challenge. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

Phoenix, Arizona is at once one of America's fastest growing cities and its least sustainable one. A sprawling megalopolis of more than five million souls, it is parched-the result of minimal rainfall and scorching heat. Yet historically, its population has been hostile to both placing limits on growth and restricting property rights. In Bird on Fire, noted chronicler of contemporary social life Andrew Ross relies on Phoenix's to perform a paradoxical task: explain how we can establish sustainable urban living in this most unsustainable of cities. The vast majority of authors writing on sustainable cities focus on places like Portland, New York, and various west European cities that have excellent public transit systems and high density. Ross does the opposite, and contends that if we can't make fast-growing cities like Phoenix sustainable, then the whole movement is has a major problem.

In the course of tracing how it grew and explaining why it is so unsustainable, he considers how it might become sustainable. He contends that if Phoenix is to achieve this goal, it will occur primarily through political and social change--greater civic engagement, democratic inclusion, and socially just policies--rather than through technological fixes. Technological fixes are not unimportant, but for them to work we first must rearrange our social and political arrangements. In sum, Bird on Fire provides a truly fascinating window into one of the pressing social issues of our time--finding pathways to sustainability in an era of increasing energy consumption and sprawl.

About the Author

Andrew Ross is Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. He is the author of Fast Boat to China, The Celebration Chronicles, Nice Work if You Can Get It, and No-Collar. He has written for ArtForum, The Nation, and The Village Voice.

Table of Contents

By the Time I Got to Phoenix

1. Gambling at the Water Table

2. The Road Runner's Appetite

3. The Battle for Downtown

I-Artists Step Up

II-Who Can Afford the Green City?

4. Living Downstream

5. The Sun Always Rises

6. Viva Los Suns

7. Land for the Free

8. Delivering the Good

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

h, August 7, 2012 (view all comments by h)
An important study of the connections between development, immigration policy, and environmental threats in the New West. Ross sets out to discover whether Phoenix, AZ's claims to sustainability are accurate and uncovers the structural inequalities that must change to make sustainability a reality here and throughout cities in the US.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780199828265
Author:
Ross, Andrew
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Author:
null, Andrew
Subject:
Sociology - Urban
Subject:
Sociology | Environment
Subject:
Technology
Subject:
Sociology | Environment & Technology
Subject:
Sociology-Urban Studies
Publication Date:
20111131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
19 bandw halftone; 3 bandw line
Pages:
312
Dimensions:
6.5 x 9.3 x 1.1 in 1.2 lb

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Politics » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » General
History and Social Science » Sociology » Urban Studies » City Specific
History and Social Science » Sociology » Urban Studies » General
History and Social Science » World History » General
Metaphysics » General
Religion » Comparative Religion » General
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Environment

Bird on Fire: Lessons from the World's Least Sustainable City Used Hardcover
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Product details 312 pages Oxford University Press, USA - English 9780199828265 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Ross (Fast Boat to China) examines the efforts toward and obstacles to sustainability for Phoenix, Ariz., a city dependent on imported water and driven by the boom-and-bust economy of land speculation. On the site of the Hohokam culture, which fizzled out in the 14th century when stressed by drought and floods, human devastation of the ecosystem, and inability to absorb an influx of immigrants, Phoenix seems eerily bent on repeating the mistakes of its predecessors. With an open eye and a progressive proclivity, Ross reveals fascinating inconsistencies and contradictions in the current push and pull between resilience and self-destruction: Matthew Moore, an artist-farmer, runs two farms, a 50-family CSA and an industrial agricultural operation. Artist-activists refashioning a vibrant, livable inner city 'thrilled advocates of the Creative City' — until the popular Friday artwalks became too creative and 'the police showed up en masse, and on horseback' to intimidate participants. African and Latino communities, both suffering from monstrous pollution thrust on low-income neighborhoods, have trouble joining forces because of long-term tensions between them. Ross's conclusion — that if sustainable urbanism is 'not directed by and toward principles of equity, then they will almost certainly end up reinforcing patterns of eco-apartheid' — is a bracing challenge. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , Phoenix, Arizona is at once one of America's fastest growing cities and its least sustainable one. A sprawling megalopolis of more than five million souls, it is parched-the result of minimal rainfall and scorching heat. Yet historically, its population has been hostile to both placing limits on growth and restricting property rights. In Bird on Fire, noted chronicler of contemporary social life Andrew Ross relies on Phoenix's to perform a paradoxical task: explain how we can establish sustainable urban living in this most unsustainable of cities. The vast majority of authors writing on sustainable cities focus on places like Portland, New York, and various west European cities that have excellent public transit systems and high density. Ross does the opposite, and contends that if we can't make fast-growing cities like Phoenix sustainable, then the whole movement is has a major problem.

In the course of tracing how it grew and explaining why it is so unsustainable, he considers how it might become sustainable. He contends that if Phoenix is to achieve this goal, it will occur primarily through political and social change--greater civic engagement, democratic inclusion, and socially just policies--rather than through technological fixes. Technological fixes are not unimportant, but for them to work we first must rearrange our social and political arrangements. In sum, Bird on Fire provides a truly fascinating window into one of the pressing social issues of our time--finding pathways to sustainability in an era of increasing energy consumption and sprawl.

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