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Living in Denial: Climate Change, Emotions, and Everyday Life

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

andlt;Pandgt;Global warming is the most significant environmental issue of our time, yet public response in Western nations has been meager. Why have so few taken any action? In Living in Denial, sociologist Kari Norgaard searches for answers to this question, drawing on interviews and ethnographic data from her study of "Bygdaby," the fictional name of an actual rural community in western Norway, during the unusually warm winter of 2000-2001. In 2000-2001 the first snowfall came to Bygdaby two months later than usual; ice fishing was impossible; and the ski industry had to invest substantially in artificial snow-making. Stories in local and national newspapers linked the warm winter explicitly to global warming. Yet residents did not write letters to the editor, pressure politicians, or cut down on use of fossil fuels. Norgaard attributes this lack of response to the phenomenon of socially organized denial, by which information about climate science is known in the abstract but disconnected from political, social, and private life, and sees this as emblematic of how citizens of industrialized countries are responding to global warming.Norgaard finds that for the highly educated and politically savvy residents of Bygdaby, global warming was both common knowledge and unimaginable. Norgaard traces this denial through multiple levels, from emotions to cultural norms to political economy. Her report from Bygdaby, supplemented by comparisons throughout the book to the United States, tells a larger story behind our paralysis in the face of today's alarming predictions from climate scientists.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

An analysis of why people with knowledge about climate change often fail to translate that knowledge into action.

Synopsis:

andlt;Pandgt;An analysis of why people with knowledge about climate change often fail to translate that knowledge into action.andlt;/Pandgt;

Synopsis:

Global warming is the most significant environmental issue of our time, yet public response in Western nations has been meager. Why have so few taken any action? In

Synopsis:

Global warming is the most significant environmental issue of our time, yet public response in Western nations has been meager. Why have so few taken any action? In Living in Denial, sociologist Kari Norgaard searches for answers to this question, drawing on interviews and ethnographic data from her study of "Bygdaby," the fictional name of an actual rural community in western Norway, during the unusually warm winter of 2000-2001.

In 2000-2001 the first snowfall came to Bygdaby two months later than usual; ice fishing was impossible; and the ski industry had to invest substantially in artificial snow-making. Stories in local and national newspapers linked the warm winter explicitly to global warming. Yet residents did not write letters to the editor, pressure politicians, or cut down on use of fossil fuels. Norgaard attributes this lack of response to the phenomenon of socially organized denial, by which information about climate science is known in the abstract but disconnected from political, social, and private life, and sees this as emblematic of how citizens of industrialized countries are responding to global warming.

Norgaard finds that for the highly educated and politically savvy residents of Bygdaby, global warming was both common knowledge and unimaginable. Norgaard traces this denial through multiple levels, from emotions to cultural norms to political economy. Her report from Bygdaby, supplemented by comparisons throughout the book to the United States, tells a larger story behind our paralysis in the face of today's alarming predictions from climate scientists.

About the Author

Kari Marie Norgaard is Assistant Professor of Sociology and Environmental Studies at the University of Oregon.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780262515856
Subtitle:
Climate Change, Emotions, and Everyday Life
Author:
Norgaard, Kari Marie
Author:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Publisher:
The MIT Press
Location:
Cambridge
Subject:
Environmental Science
Subject:
Sociology - General
Copyright:
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Series:
Living in Denial
Publication Date:
20110311
Binding:
Paperback
Grade Level:
from 17
Language:
English
Illustrations:
11 figures, 5 tables
Pages:
304
Dimensions:
9 x 6 x 1 in

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Related Subjects

Reference » Science Reference » Philosophy of Science
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » Climate Change and Global Warming
Science and Mathematics » Environmental Studies » General

Living in Denial: Climate Change, Emotions, and Everyday Life New Trade Paper
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Product details 304 pages MIT Press (MA) - English 9780262515856 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , An analysis of why people with knowledge about climate change often fail to translate that knowledge into action.
"Synopsis" by , andlt;Pandgt;An analysis of why people with knowledge about climate change often fail to translate that knowledge into action.andlt;/Pandgt;
"Synopsis" by , Global warming is the most significant environmental issue of our time, yet public response in Western nations has been meager. Why have so few taken any action? In
"Synopsis" by , Global warming is the most significant environmental issue of our time, yet public response in Western nations has been meager. Why have so few taken any action? In Living in Denial, sociologist Kari Norgaard searches for answers to this question, drawing on interviews and ethnographic data from her study of "Bygdaby," the fictional name of an actual rural community in western Norway, during the unusually warm winter of 2000-2001.

In 2000-2001 the first snowfall came to Bygdaby two months later than usual; ice fishing was impossible; and the ski industry had to invest substantially in artificial snow-making. Stories in local and national newspapers linked the warm winter explicitly to global warming. Yet residents did not write letters to the editor, pressure politicians, or cut down on use of fossil fuels. Norgaard attributes this lack of response to the phenomenon of socially organized denial, by which information about climate science is known in the abstract but disconnected from political, social, and private life, and sees this as emblematic of how citizens of industrialized countries are responding to global warming.

Norgaard finds that for the highly educated and politically savvy residents of Bygdaby, global warming was both common knowledge and unimaginable. Norgaard traces this denial through multiple levels, from emotions to cultural norms to political economy. Her report from Bygdaby, supplemented by comparisons throughout the book to the United States, tells a larger story behind our paralysis in the face of today's alarming predictions from climate scientists.

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