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Gerard Ter Borch

Gerard Ter Borch Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The Dutch painter Gerard ter Borch (1617–1681) was a slightly older contemporary of Johannes Vermeer. Ter Borchs beautiful and evocative paintings were not only varied in subject but also unparalleled among his peers in capturing the elegance and grace of wealthy burghers, the shimmering surface of satin, the undulating rhythms of translucent lace cuffs, and the nuanced psychological interactions between figures in an interior scene. Indeed, ter Borchs genre scenes clearly influenced works later painted by Vermeer.

This lovely book—the first major English-language publication on ter Borchs paintings—presents a selection of some of the most outstanding works from each area of the artists career: the remarkable early pictures of the 1630s, the midcareer genre paintings for which he is best known, and the small portraits that brought him prosperity throughout his life. Essays by noted experts on Dutch art discuss ter Borchs artistic development, the “modern” aspects of his paintings, and his renowned technique for painting satin.

Review:

"You pretty much have to start with satin when it comes to 17th-century Dutch painter Gerard ter Borch: for centuries, viewers have fixated on the artist's ability to reproduce the texture and sheen of satin with seemingly miraculous realism. In this study, published in conjunction with an exhibit at the National Gallery of Art and Detroit Institute of Art, Wheelock and his contributors manfully tackle the satin issue head-on, while also ingeniously using it as a springboard for exploring the painter's subtler talents. Arie Wallert's essay, complete with x-radiographs and UV-illuminated close-ups of the artist's canvases, uncovers the artist's special wiping techniques, and argues that far more important to the uncanny effects was Ter Borch's close observation of shadows and light. But it's his observations of people that the writers show to be the artist's more significant gift. Ter Borch may have made a living as a portraitist to the middle class, but he made a specialty of sympathetic but unsentimental depictions of people in odd moments of their day, often staring distractedly into space-a little boy being groomed by his mother, for instance, or a woman looking up from a book. Though Wheelock is given to labored, pedantic analysis (e.g., 'Ter Borch's sympathetic portrayal of the boy's concern for his dog indicates he intended no negative commentary on the boy's neglect of his studies, which is implicit in the pen and book that sit idly on the table beside him'), he nonetheless effectively points out the great originality of these slice-of-life canvases, many of which are virtually without precedent in their subject matter and mixture of genres. Beautifully illustrated, carefully laid out, this book allows viewers' eyes to adjust to the dazzle of Ter Borch's satin and awaken to the deeper, more delicate pleasures of his work." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Book News Annotation:

Published to accompany an exhibition in 2004-2005 held at the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC and the Detroit Institute of Arts, this slightly oversize (9.75x10.75") catalogue presents detailed entries on 52 paintings by the Dutch artist, as well as three short essays on his career, style, and technique. Many of the catalogue entries include b&w plates of comparative works as well as the full-page color plate of Ter Borch's paintings, which depict domestic scenes made striking by psychological nuance and his beautifully observed and detailed treatment of costume. Wheelock is curator of northern baroque painting at the National Gallery. He co- authored the volume with Alison McNeil Kettering (art history, Carleton College), Arie Wallert (curator, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam), and Marjorie E. Wieseman (curator, Cincinnati Art Museum).
Annotation 2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

About the Author

Arthur K. Wheelock, Jr., is curator of northern baroque painting at the National Gallery of Art and the author of Johannes Vermeer and Vermeer and the Art of Painting, both available from Yale University Press; Alison McNeil Kettering is William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Art History at Carleton College; Arie Wallert is curator at the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam; and Marjorie Elizabeth Wieseman is curator of European painting and sculpture at the Cincinnati Art Museum.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780300106398
Contribution:
Kettering, Alison
Contribution:
Wallert, Arie
Contribution by:
Wallert, Arie
Contribution by:
Kettering, Alison
Contribution:
Kettering, Alison
Contribution:
Wallert, Arie
Author:
Wallert, Arie
Author:
Kettering, Alison McNeil
Author:
Wheelock, Arthur K.
Author:
Wieseman, Marjorie E.
Publisher:
Yale University Press
Subject:
History - General
Subject:
General Art
Subject:
History : General
Subject:
Art-History and Criticism
Edition Description:
Trade Cloth
Publication Date:
20041131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Illustrations:
40 b/w + 60 color illus.
Pages:
240
Dimensions:
10.5 x 9.5 in 3.35 lb

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » History and Criticism

Gerard Ter Borch
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$ In Stock
Product details 240 pages Yale University Press - English 9780300106398 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "You pretty much have to start with satin when it comes to 17th-century Dutch painter Gerard ter Borch: for centuries, viewers have fixated on the artist's ability to reproduce the texture and sheen of satin with seemingly miraculous realism. In this study, published in conjunction with an exhibit at the National Gallery of Art and Detroit Institute of Art, Wheelock and his contributors manfully tackle the satin issue head-on, while also ingeniously using it as a springboard for exploring the painter's subtler talents. Arie Wallert's essay, complete with x-radiographs and UV-illuminated close-ups of the artist's canvases, uncovers the artist's special wiping techniques, and argues that far more important to the uncanny effects was Ter Borch's close observation of shadows and light. But it's his observations of people that the writers show to be the artist's more significant gift. Ter Borch may have made a living as a portraitist to the middle class, but he made a specialty of sympathetic but unsentimental depictions of people in odd moments of their day, often staring distractedly into space-a little boy being groomed by his mother, for instance, or a woman looking up from a book. Though Wheelock is given to labored, pedantic analysis (e.g., 'Ter Borch's sympathetic portrayal of the boy's concern for his dog indicates he intended no negative commentary on the boy's neglect of his studies, which is implicit in the pen and book that sit idly on the table beside him'), he nonetheless effectively points out the great originality of these slice-of-life canvases, many of which are virtually without precedent in their subject matter and mixture of genres. Beautifully illustrated, carefully laid out, this book allows viewers' eyes to adjust to the dazzle of Ter Borch's satin and awaken to the deeper, more delicate pleasures of his work." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
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