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Race of the Century: The Heroic True Story of the 1908 New York to Paris Auto Race

by

Race of the Century: The Heroic True Story of the 1908 New York to Paris Auto Race Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

On the morning of February 12, 1908, six cars from four different countries lined up in the swirling snow of Times Square, surrounded by a frenzied crowd of 250,000. The seventeen men who started the New York to Paris auto race were an international roster of personalities: a charismatic Norwegian outdoorsman, a witty French count, a pair of Italian sophisticates, an aristocratic German army officer, and a cranky mechanic from Buffalo, New York. President Theodore Roosevelt congratulated them by saying, “I like people who do something, not the good safe man who stays at home.” These men were doing something no man had ever done before, and their journey would take them very far from home.

Their course was calculated at more than 21,000 miles, across three continents and six countries. It would cross over mountain ranges—some as high as 10,000 feet—and through Arctic freeze and desert heat, from drifting snow to blowing sand. Bridgeless rivers and seas of mud blocked the way, while wolves, bears, and bandits stalked vast, lonely expanses of the route. And there were no gas stations, no garages, and no replacement parts available. The automobile, after all, had been sold commercially for only fifteen years. Many people along the route had never even seen one.

Among the heroes of the race were two men who ultimately transcended the others in tenacity, skill, and leadership. Ober-lieutenant Hans Koeppen, a rising officer in the Prussian army, led the German team in their canvas-topped 40-horsepower Protos. His amiable personality belied a core of sheer determination, and by the race’s end, he had won the respect of even his toughest critics. His counterpart on the U.S. team was George Schuster, a blue-collar mechanic and son of German immigrants, who led the Americans in their lightweight 60-horsepower Thomas Flyer. A born competitor, Schuster joined the U.S. team as an undistinguished workman, but he would battle Koeppen until the very end. Ultimately the German and the American would be left alone in the race, fighting the elements, exhaustion, and each other until the winning car’s glorious entrance into Paris, on July 30, 1908.

Lincoln’s Birthday, February 12, 1908 . . .

The crowds gathering on Broadway all morning were not out to honor Abe Lincoln, either. They were on the avenue to catch sight of the start of the New York-to-Paris Automobile Race. There would only be one—one race round the world, one start, and one particular way that, for the people who lived through it, the world would never be the same. The automobile was about to take it all on: not just Broadway, but the farthest reaches to which it could lead. On that absurdity, the auto was about to come of age.

“By ten o’clock,” reported the Tribune, “Broadway up to the northernmost reaches of Harlem looked as though everybody was expecting the circus to come to town.” The excitement was generated by the potential of the auto to overcome the three challenges most frustrating to the twentieth century: distance, nature, and technology. First, distance: in the form of twenty-two thousand miles of the Northern Hemisphere, from New York west to Paris. Second, nature: in seasons at their most unyielding. And third, the very machinery itself, which would be pressed hard by the race to defeat itself. Barely twenty years old as a contraption and only ten as a practical conveyance, the automobile couldn’t reasonably be expected to be ready to take on the world. But there were men who were ready and that was what mattered.

—From Race of the Century

From the Hardcover edition.

Synopsis:

Provides an in-depth account of a 1908 New York to Paris auto race that took the competitors westward across the United States from New York City, aboard a boat to the Far East, across Japan to board another ship to Vladivostok, to a trek across Siberia, Asia, and Eastern Europe to Paris. 30,000 first printing.

About the Author

Julie M. Fenster is an author and historian who began her career at Automobile Quarterly, where her book Packard: The Pride won the Best Book award from the National Automotive Journalism Conference. The author of six additional books on a wide range of historical topics, she has written for American Heritage, the New York Times, and American History. Her previous book, Ether Day: The Strange Tale of America’s Greatest Medical Discovery and the Haunted Men Who Made It, received the Anesthesia Foundation Award for best book of 2001. Fenster lives in upstate New York, where she drives her sports car (pictured) on roads that trace the route of the 1908 New York to Paris Auto Race.

Table of Contents

Holiday — A race course — Heroes wanted — Race to the starting line — To defend America against the world — One down in New York — Towpath sprint — Act of war — Snow spray — Combustion — Gumbo — A single room in Chicago — Cheyenne — On strike — Rockies — Pioneer tracks — California postcard — Death in the desert — Sharp turns — The Japanese countryside — Second start — Sportsmanship — Wild east — Blue water — Flash flood — Out in front — The favor of the czar — New York to Paris — Young men in the morning — The men and the cars.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307238498
Subtitle:
The Heroic True Story of the 1908 New York to Paris Auto Race
Publisher:
Crown Publishers
Author:
Fenster, Julie M.
Author:
Julie M. Fenster
Author:
Fenster, Julie
Subject:
History-United States - 20th Century
Subject:
History : United States - 20th Century
Subject:
United States - 20th Century
Subject:
Motor Sports
Subject:
History
Subject:
New York to Paris Race, 1908.
Subject:
Automotive-Racing Biographies
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20050524
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
387

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » US History » 20th Century » General
Sports and Outdoors » Sports and Fitness » Sports General
Transportation » Automotive » Racing

Race of the Century: The Heroic True Story of the 1908 New York to Paris Auto Race
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Product details 387 pages Random House Incorporated - English 9780307238498 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Provides an in-depth account of a 1908 New York to Paris auto race that took the competitors westward across the United States from New York City, aboard a boat to the Far East, across Japan to board another ship to Vladivostok, to a trek across Siberia, Asia, and Eastern Europe to Paris. 30,000 first printing.
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