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Grant Wood: A Life

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Grant Wood: A Life Cover

 

Review-A-Day

"Grant Wood's life story, as he told it to the press and as many of his biographers have repeated it, went like this: Born in rural Iowa in 1891, Wood showed artistic precocity from an early age, flirted with bohemianism, turned his back on his benighted region under the sway of H. L. Mencken, traveled to France, grew a hideous beard, produced derivative Impressionist paintings, returned home, shaved off the beard, discovered a 'native' subject matter and style (most famously in his 1930 painting American Gothic), and became America's 'artist in overalls.' Well adjusted, hard working, and clean living, the mature Wood was everything the stereotypical artist wasn't. Most of all, he was masculine — 'a sturdy, foursquare son of the Middle West,' as an admiring critic put it. The art, like the artist, was solid, straightforward, and robustly American." Steven Biel, The Wilson Quarterly (Read the entire Wilson Quarterly review)

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

He claimed to be “the plainest kind of fellow you can find. There isnt a single thing Ive done, or experienced,” said Grant Wood, “thats been even the least bit exciting.”

Wood was one of Americas most famous regionalist painters; to love his work was the equivalent of loving America itself. In his time, he was an “almost mythical figure,” recognized most supremely for his hard-boiled farm scene, American Gothic, a painting that has come to reflect the essence of Americas traditional values—a simple, decent, homespun tribute to our lost agrarian age.

In this major new biography of Americas most acclaimed, and misunderstood, regionalist painter, Grant Wood is revealed to have been anything but plain, or simple . . .

R. Tripp Evans reveals the true complexity of the man and the image Wood so carefully constructed of himself. Grant Wood called himself a farmer-painter but farming held little interest for him. He appeared to be a self-taught painter with his scenes of farmlands, farm workers, and folklore but he was classically trained, a sophisticated artist who had studied the Old Masters and Flemish art as well as impressionism. He lived a bohemian life and painted in Paris and Munich in the 1920s, fleeing what H. L. Mencken referred to as “the booboisie” of small-town America.

We see Wood as an artist haunted and inspired by the images of childhood; by the complex relationship with his father (stern, pious, the “manliest of men”); with his sister and his beloved mother (Wood shared his studio and sleeping quarters with his mother until her death at seventy-seven; he was forty-four).

We see Woods homosexuality and how his studied masculinity was a ruse that shaped his work.

Here is Woods life and work explored more deeply and insightfully than ever before. Drawing on letters, the artists unfinished autobiography, his sisters writings, and many never-before-seen documents, Evanss book is a dimensional portrait of a deeply complicated artist who became a “National Symbol.” It is as well a portrait of the American art scene at a time when Americas Calvinistic spirit and provincialism saw Europe as decadent and artists were divided between red-blooded patriotic men and “hothouse aesthetes.”

Thomas Hart Benton said of Grant Wood: “When this new America looks back for landmarks to help gauge its forward footsteps, it will find a monument standing up in the midst of the wreckage . . . This monument will be made out of Grant Woods works.”

Review:

"The fame of the iconic, often parodied American Gothic has long masked its creator. Much about Grant Wood's patriotism and masculinity has been read into the painting's pitchfork-holding farmer and his dour companion standing in front of a Midwestern farmhouse. Evans, an art historian at Wheaton College in Massachusetts, argues that even more has been misread, overshadowing a rich and varied artistic career. Associated with the Regionalist movement in painting, Wood (1891 — 1942) cultivated a hearty Midwestern image that hid his homosexuality. What Wood hid from polite society, he could not help revealing in his paintings: 'the object of his desire is only partially abstracted in --for in the undeniably erotic curves of Stone City, we register the muscular outlines of the powerful male body.' His mother and his sister, Nan, further protected him. The complicated relationship included living together until Nan married--perhaps a reaction to Wood's hard and detached father, who died when Wood was 10. Evans's in-depth, gendered readings of Wood's paintings situate him in the longer history of male artists' gendered self-portrayals (bracketed by Oscar Wilde and Jackson Pollock), providing a useful new insight into Wood's place in American art. 16 pages of color photos; b&w illus. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

About the Author

R. Tripp Evans is Professor of Art History at Wheaton College in Massachusetts. He is the author of Romancing the Maya: Mexican Antiquity in the American Imagination, 1820-1915 (2004). He received his doctoral degree in the history of art from Yale University and has served as a visiting lecturer at Yale, Wellesley College, and Brown University. He and his partner, Ed Cabral, live in Providence, Rhode Island.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307266293
Author:
Evans, R. Tripp
Publisher:
Knopf Publishing Group
Subject:
History - Modern (Late 19th Century to 1945)
Subject:
Techniques - Painting
Subject:
Artists, Architects, Photographers
Subject:
Art - General
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20101031
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
16PP COLOR; 33 PHOTOS IN TEXT
Pages:
432
Dimensions:
9.53 x 6.65 x 1.44 in 1.8125 lb

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Art » Artists
Arts and Entertainment » Art » General
Arts and Entertainment » Art » Painting » General
Biography » Artists, Architects, and Photographers

Grant Wood: A Life Used Hardcover
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Product details 432 pages Knopf Publishing Group - English 9780307266293 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "The fame of the iconic, often parodied American Gothic has long masked its creator. Much about Grant Wood's patriotism and masculinity has been read into the painting's pitchfork-holding farmer and his dour companion standing in front of a Midwestern farmhouse. Evans, an art historian at Wheaton College in Massachusetts, argues that even more has been misread, overshadowing a rich and varied artistic career. Associated with the Regionalist movement in painting, Wood (1891 — 1942) cultivated a hearty Midwestern image that hid his homosexuality. What Wood hid from polite society, he could not help revealing in his paintings: 'the object of his desire is only partially abstracted in --for in the undeniably erotic curves of Stone City, we register the muscular outlines of the powerful male body.' His mother and his sister, Nan, further protected him. The complicated relationship included living together until Nan married--perhaps a reaction to Wood's hard and detached father, who died when Wood was 10. Evans's in-depth, gendered readings of Wood's paintings situate him in the longer history of male artists' gendered self-portrayals (bracketed by Oscar Wilde and Jackson Pollock), providing a useful new insight into Wood's place in American art. 16 pages of color photos; b&w illus. (Oct.)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Review A Day" by , "Grant Wood's life story, as he told it to the press and as many of his biographers have repeated it, went like this: Born in rural Iowa in 1891, Wood showed artistic precocity from an early age, flirted with bohemianism, turned his back on his benighted region under the sway of H. L. Mencken, traveled to France, grew a hideous beard, produced derivative Impressionist paintings, returned home, shaved off the beard, discovered a 'native' subject matter and style (most famously in his 1930 painting American Gothic), and became America's 'artist in overalls.' Well adjusted, hard working, and clean living, the mature Wood was everything the stereotypical artist wasn't. Most of all, he was masculine — 'a sturdy, foursquare son of the Middle West,' as an admiring critic put it. The art, like the artist, was solid, straightforward, and robustly American." (Read the entire Wilson Quarterly review)
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