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Freedom's Battle: The Origins of Humanitarian Intervention

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Freedom's Battle: The Origins of Humanitarian Intervention Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Why do we sometimes let evil happen to others and sometimes rally to stop it? Whose lives matter to us? These are the key questions posed in this important and perceptive study of the largely forgotten nineteenth-century “atrocitarians”—some of the world’s first human rights activists. Wildly romantic, eccentrically educated, and full of bizarre enthusiasms, they were also morally serious people on the vanguard of a new political consciousness. And their legacy has much to teach us about the human rights crises of today.

Gary Bass shatters the myth that the history of humanitarian intervention began with Bill Clinton, or even Woodrow Wilson, and shows, instead, that there is a tangled international tradition, reaching back more than two hundred years, of confronting the suffering of innocent foreigners. Bass describes the political and cultural landscapes out of which these activists arose, as an emergent free press exposed Europeans and Americans to atrocities taking place beyond their shores and galvanized them to act. He brings alive a century of passionate advocacy in Britain, France, Russia, and the United States: the fight the British waged against the oppression of the Greeks in the 1820s, the huge uproar against a notorious massacre in Bulgaria in the 1870s, and the American campaign to stop the Armenian genocide in 1915. He tells the gripping stories of the activists themselves: Byron, Bentham, Madison, Gladstone, Dostoevsky, and Theodore Roosevelt among them.

Military missions in the name of human rights have always been dangerous undertakings. There has invariably been the risk of radical destabilization and the threatening blurring of imperial and humanitarian intentions. Yet Bass demonstrates that even in the imperialistic heyday of the nineteenth century, humanitarian ideals could play a significant role in shaping world politics. He argues that the failure of today’s leading democracies to shoulder such responsibilities has led to catastrophes such as those in Rwanda and Darfur—catastrophes that he maintains are neither inevitable nor traditional.

Timely and illuminating, Freedom’s Battle challenges our assumptions about the history of morally motivated foreign policy and sets out a path for reclaiming that inheritance with greater modesty and wisdom.

Synopsis:

Gary J. Bass is associate professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton University. He is the

Synopsis:

Traces the history of international humanitarian intervention, looking back over more than two hundred years to reveal the cultural and political factors that spawned early human rights activists and the role of a free press that exposed atrocities, from Greek oppression by the Ottoman Empire to the U.S. campaign against the 1915 Armenian genocide. 20,000 first printing.

Synopsis:

Gary J. Bass is associate professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton University. He is the author of Stay the Hand of Vengeance: The Politics of War Crimes Tribunals. A former reporter for The Economist, he has written often for The New York Times, as well as writing for The New Yorker, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, The New Republic, and Foreign Affairs. He lives in Princeton and New York City.

Table of Contents

Introduction — Humanitarianism or imperialism? — Media and solidarity — The diplomacy of humanitarian intervention — Greeks — The Greek revolution — The Scio massacre — The London Greek committee — America and the Greeks — Lord Byron's war — Canning — The Holy alliance — A rumor of slaughter — Navarino — Syrians — France under the second empire — The massacres — Public opinion — Occupying Syria — Mission creep — Bulgarians — The Eastern question — Pan-slavism — Bosnia and Serbia — Bulgarian horrors — The Russo-Turkish war — The Midlothian campaign — Conclusion — Armenians — The uses of history — The international politics of humanitarian intervention — The domestic politics of humanitarian intervention — A new imperialism?.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307269294
Subtitle:
The Origins of Humanitarian Intervention
Publisher:
Alfred A. Knopf
Creator:
Gary Jonathan Bass
Author:
Bass, Gary J.
Author:
Gary Jonathan Bass
Author:
Bass, Gary Jonathan
Subject:
History : Modern - 19th Century
Subject:
Modern - 19th Century
Subject:
History
Subject:
Humanitarian intervention.
Subject:
International
Subject:
Political Freedom & Security - Human Rights
Subject:
Military - General
Subject:
Humanitarian intervention - History
Subject:
Western Civilization-General
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20080819
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
509

Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Law » General
History and Social Science » Military » General History
History and Social Science » Politics » Human Rights
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Foreign Policy
History and Social Science » World History » 1650 to Present
History and Social Science » World History » General

Freedom's Battle: The Origins of Humanitarian Intervention
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Product details 509 pages Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group - English 9780307269294 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Gary J. Bass is associate professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton University. He is the
"Synopsis" by , Traces the history of international humanitarian intervention, looking back over more than two hundred years to reveal the cultural and political factors that spawned early human rights activists and the role of a free press that exposed atrocities, from Greek oppression by the Ottoman Empire to the U.S. campaign against the 1915 Armenian genocide. 20,000 first printing.
"Synopsis" by , Gary J. Bass is associate professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton University. He is the author of Stay the Hand of Vengeance: The Politics of War Crimes Tribunals. A former reporter for The Economist, he has written often for The New York Times, as well as writing for The New Yorker, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, The New Republic, and Foreign Affairs. He lives in Princeton and New York City.
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