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Bruno, Chief of Police

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Bruno, Chief of Police Cover

ISBN13: 9780307270177
ISBN10: 0307270173
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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The first installment in a wonderful new series that follows the exploits of Benoît Courrèges, a policeman in a small French village where the rituals of the café still rule. Bruno—as he is affectionately nicknamed—may be the towns only municipal policeman, but in the hearts and minds of its denizens, he is chief of police.

Bruno is a former soldier who has embraced the pleasures and slow rhythms of country life—living in his restored shepherds cottage; patronizing the weekly market; sparring with, and basically ignoring, the European Union bureaucrats from Brussels. He has a gun but never wears it; he has the power to arrest but never uses it. But then the murder of an elderly North African who fought in the French army changes everything and galvanizes Brunos attention: the man was found with a swastika carved into his chest.

Because of the cases potential political ramifications, a young policewoman is sent from Paris to aid Bruno with his investigation. The two immediately suspect militants from the anti-immigrant National Front, but when a visiting scholar helps to untangle the dead mans past, Brunos suspicions turn toward a more complex motive. His investigation draws him into one of the darkest chapters of French history—World War II, a time of terror and betrayal that set brother against brother. Bruno soon discovers that even his seemingly perfect corner of la belle France is not exempt from that periods sinister legacy.

Bruno, Chief of Police is deftly dark, mesmerizing, and totally engaging.

Review:

"Policing in Chief Bruno Courrges's sun-dappled patch of Prigord involves protecting local fromages from E.U. hygiene inspectors, orchestrating village parades and enjoying the obligatory leisurely lunch — that is, until the brutal murder of an elderly Algerian immigrant instantly jolts Walker's second novel (after The Caves of Prigord) from provincial cozy to timely whodunit. As a high-powered team of investigators, including a criminally attractive female inspector, invade sleepy St. Denis to forestall any anti-Arab violence, the amiable Bruno must begin regarding his neighbors — or should we say potential suspects — in a rather different light. Without sacrificing a soupon of the novel's smalltown charm or its characters' endearing quirkiness, Walker deftly drives his plot toward a dark place where old sins breed fresh heartbreak. Walker, a foreign affairs journalist, is also the author of such nonfiction titles as The Iraq War and America Reborn." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

The first installment in a wonderful new series that follows the exploits of Benoit Courreges, a policeman in a small French village where the rituals of the cafe still rule. Bruno--as he is affectionately nicknamed--may be the town's only municipal policeman, but in the hearts and minds of its denizens, he is chief of police.

Bruno is a former soldier who has embraced the pleasures and slow rhythms of country life--living in his restored shepherd's cottage; patronizing the weekly market; sparring with, and basically ignoring, the European Union bureaucrats from Brussels. He has a gun but never wears it; he has the power to arrest but never uses it. But then the murder of an elderly North African who fought in the French army changes everything and galvanizes Bruno's attention: the man was found with a swastika carved into his chest.

Because of the case's potential political ramifications, a young policewoman is sent from Paris to aid Bruno with his investigation. The two immediately suspect militants from the anti-immigrant National Front, but when a visiting scholar helps to untangle the dead man's past, Bruno's suspicions turn toward a more complex motive. His investigation draws him into one of the darkest chapters of French history--World War II, a time of terror and betrayal that set brother against brother. Bruno soon discovers that even his seemingly perfect corner of la belle France is not exempt from that period's sinister legacy.

Bruno, Chief of Police is deftly dark, mesmerizing, and totally engaging.

About the Author

Martin Walker is the senior director of the Global Business Policy Council and editor emeritus and international affairs columnist at United Press International. Formerly Moscow and U.S. bureau chief for Britains The Guardian, he is also a senior scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C. His books include The Cold War: A History, a New York Times Notable Book and short-listed for the Whitbread Book of the Year Prize, and The Caves of Périgord, a novel. He has written for The New York Times, The New Yorker, and The Times Literary Supplement. He lives in Washington, D.C., and the southwest of France.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

Robert Moyer, June 16, 2009 (view all comments by Robert Moyer)
The title of this book is a bit misleading: Bruno is not just the chief of police, he is the entire police force of the tiny village St. Denis. Deep in the Perigord, this village preserves the qualities of provincial France so treasured by tourists and natives alike—the fortress-like church, the market square, the ritual morning coffee at the cafe on the town square. A veteran of the Kosovo conflict, Bruno spends his time negotiating between feisty neighbors, arranging holiday parades, and renovating his ancient farmhouse. He hasn’t even taken his pistol out of the office since that kangaroo got away from the circus. After all, what can happen to a town of only 2,900?

The twenty-first century, of course. Just outside of town there is a re-enactment park playing to the tourists, where Joan of Arc is burned at the stake twice a day. Bruno collaborates with the local cheesemakers to avoid the EU inspectors and their Draconian regulations. And then—a murder. An Algerian war hero, who recently moved to be near his family, is found dead with a swastika carved in his chest. Suspicion comes down on local youth members of the far right Front National, and the Front National comes down on St. Denis. So does the national press, and the national police, looking like emissaries “…from an advanced and probably hostile civilization.” The murder also exposes the deep schism even in St. Denis, the sentiment that the “Arabs” are “different.” Bruno must do everything in his power to defend his home; he cannot let this murder rend asunder the delicate fabric of his community.

His search leads him from the present to the past, which is ever near to hand in France. With research from some unlikely sources, he soon discovers a truth: “The past doesn’t die. It even keeps the power to kill.” Indeed, the killers emerge from the past in a united effort inconceivable except to right some powerful wrong. Bruno must play out his hand carefully if he is not to destroy the fragile balance in his community. At the hands of the author, he does so with a sense of grace, and ultimate justice. “Vive la France!” cry the June 18 Resistance parade marchers. “Vive le Bruno,” cries the reader of this new series.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780307270177
Subtitle:
A Novel of the French Countryside
Publisher:
Knopf
Author:
Walker, Martin
Subject:
Mystery & Detective - Police Procedural
Subject:
Mystery fiction
Subject:
France, Southwest
Subject:
Mystery-A to Z
Publication Date:
20090324
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
288
Dimensions:
8.60x6.02x1.17 in. 1.01 lbs.

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Mystery » A to Z

Bruno, Chief of Police
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 288 pages Knopf Publishing Group - English 9780307270177 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Policing in Chief Bruno Courrges's sun-dappled patch of Prigord involves protecting local fromages from E.U. hygiene inspectors, orchestrating village parades and enjoying the obligatory leisurely lunch — that is, until the brutal murder of an elderly Algerian immigrant instantly jolts Walker's second novel (after The Caves of Prigord) from provincial cozy to timely whodunit. As a high-powered team of investigators, including a criminally attractive female inspector, invade sleepy St. Denis to forestall any anti-Arab violence, the amiable Bruno must begin regarding his neighbors — or should we say potential suspects — in a rather different light. Without sacrificing a soupon of the novel's smalltown charm or its characters' endearing quirkiness, Walker deftly drives his plot toward a dark place where old sins breed fresh heartbreak. Walker, a foreign affairs journalist, is also the author of such nonfiction titles as The Iraq War and America Reborn." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , The first installment in a wonderful new series that follows the exploits of Benoit Courreges, a policeman in a small French village where the rituals of the cafe still rule. Bruno--as he is affectionately nicknamed--may be the town's only municipal policeman, but in the hearts and minds of its denizens, he is chief of police.

Bruno is a former soldier who has embraced the pleasures and slow rhythms of country life--living in his restored shepherd's cottage; patronizing the weekly market; sparring with, and basically ignoring, the European Union bureaucrats from Brussels. He has a gun but never wears it; he has the power to arrest but never uses it. But then the murder of an elderly North African who fought in the French army changes everything and galvanizes Bruno's attention: the man was found with a swastika carved into his chest.

Because of the case's potential political ramifications, a young policewoman is sent from Paris to aid Bruno with his investigation. The two immediately suspect militants from the anti-immigrant National Front, but when a visiting scholar helps to untangle the dead man's past, Bruno's suspicions turn toward a more complex motive. His investigation draws him into one of the darkest chapters of French history--World War II, a time of terror and betrayal that set brother against brother. Bruno soon discovers that even his seemingly perfect corner of la belle France is not exempt from that period's sinister legacy.

Bruno, Chief of Police is deftly dark, mesmerizing, and totally engaging.

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