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The Complete Dog Book: 20th Edition

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The Complete Dog Book: 20th Edition Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Chapter 1

Brittany

Named for the French province in which it originated, the brittany was first registered by the American Kennel Club as the Brittany Spaniel in 1934. Although called a spaniel, by its manner of working game the Brittany belongs with the pointing breeds. In appearance, the breed is smaller than the setters but leggier than the spaniels, having a short tail and characteristic high ear-set. On September 1, 1982, the breed's official AKC name became Brittany, to more correctly identify their hunting style.

Though it is generally conceded that the basic stock for all bird dogs is the same, most of the facts concerning the development and spread of the various breeds are lost in antiquity. The first accurate records to pinpoint the actual Brittany-type dog are seventeenth-century paintings and tapestries. The frequency with which these appear suggests this type of dog was fairly common. Paintings by Jean-Baptiste Oudry (1686-1755) show a liver-and-white dog pointing partridge. This same type of dog is common in Flemish paintings from the school of Jan Steen. Still other artists show this type of bird dog, so it would appear that it was common throughout the northern coast of France and in Holland.

Still, there is nothing written before 1850 that can be unequivocally interpreted as a reference to the Brittany. In that year, the English clergyman Reverend Davies wrote of hunting in Carhaix with small, bobtailed dogs. They were not as smooth as the Pointer, but worked well in the brush. They pointed, retrieved game well, and were particularly popular with poachers, as the nature of that occupation required that the dogs be easy to handle. The description fits the Brittany to perfection.

It was speculated, and in at least one case confirmed, that around 1900 some native spaniels of Brittany were mated with English pointing dogs, whose owners vacationed in France, for woodcock shooting. These matings intensified the pointing qualities of the breed while the basic features remained essentially Breton. The Brittany was an all-purpose dog, a family pet, and a guard dog as well as a hunting dog for the thrifty French peasant. This certainly influenced its shape, size, and disposition. The climate, the nature of the terrain hunted, the manner of hunting, and even its popularity with poachers all had an effect on the type of coat, keenness of nose, and retrieving ability that was developed over the years.

Legend has it that the first tailless ancestor of the modern Brittany emerged in the mid-1800s at Pontou, a little town in the valley of Douron. It resulted from a cross between a white-and-mahogany bitch owned by a hunter in the region and a lemon-and-white dog brought to Brittany for woodcock shooting by an English sportsman. Of two tailless puppies in this litter, one proved outstanding. His work in the field has been described as wonderful, and he became a popular stud. All of his litters produced puppies either without tails or with short stubs.

The Brittany became a recognized breed in 1907, when Boy, an orange-and-white, was registered in France as the first l'éeacute;pagneul Breton queue courte naturelle. This name was soon shortened to l’épagneul Breton, or Brittany Spaniel. Before 1907, Brittanys had competed in classes for Miscellaneous French spaniels.

In the same year, an outline for the first breed standard was written. This ear

Synopsis:

Describes the official breed standards for the 153 different breeds recognized by the American Kennel Club, offering a history and photo of each breed, covering such topics as choosing the right dog, dog obedience, training, health care and first aid.

Synopsis:

For more than seventy-five years, The Complete Dog Book has been the premier reference on purebred dogs. Now in its twentieth edition, this treasured guide is an essential volume for every dog owner and owner-to-be.

Comprehensive and thoughtfully organized, The Complete Dog Book features all 153 breeds recognized by the American Kennel Club, the official breed standards, breed histories, and photographs. Also included are the twelve most recently recognized breeds: Anatolian Shepherd Dog, Black Russian Terrier, German Pinscher, Glen of Imaal Terrier, Havanese, Löwchen, Neapolitan Mastiff, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, Parson Russell Terrier, Polish Lowland Sheepdog, Spinone Italiano, and Toy Fox Terrier.

Along with AKC registration procedures and current forms, The Complete Dog Book includes sections on

• choosing the dog that’s right for you

• training

• nutrition

• grooming

• responsible breeding

• canine first-aid

• joining a dog club

• Canine Good Citizen® program

• every AKC sport: Agility, Conformation, Coonhound, Earthdog, Field Trials, Herding, Hunt Tests, Junior Showmanship, Lure Coursing, Obedience, Rally, and Tracking

Concluding with an extensive glossary of terms and line drawings, The Complete Dog Book is a reference that dog aficionados will turn to again and again.

Table of Contents

The American Kennel Club — Selecting the Right Purebrec Dog — The Breeds: Histories and Official Standards — The AKC Breeds — Disqualifications Applying to All Breeds — How Height and Length Are Measured on a Dog — Inaugural AKC Registrations — The Groups — Sporting Breeds — Brittany — Pointer — German Shorthaired Pointer — German Wirehaired Pointer — Chesapeake Basy Retriever — Curly-Coated Retriever — Flat-Coated Retriever — Golden Retriever — Labrador Retriever — Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever — English Setter — Gordon Setter — Irish Setter — American Water Spaniel — Clumber Spaniel — Cocker Spaniel — English Cocker Spaniel — English Springer Spaniel — Field Spaniel — Irish Water Spaniel — Sussex Spaniel — Welsh Springer Spaniel — Spinone Italiano — Vizsla — Weimaraner — Wirehaired Pointing Griffon — Hound Breeds — Afghan Hound — Basenji — Basset Hound — Beagle — Black and Tan Coonhound — Bloodhound — Borzoi — Dachshund — American Foxhound — English Foxhound — Greyhound — Harrier — Ibizan Hound — Irish Wolfhound — Norwegian Elkhound — Otterhound — Petit Basset Griffon Verdeen — Pharaoh Hound — Rhodesian Ridgeback — Saluki — Scottish Deerhound — Whippet — Working Breeds — Akita — Alaskan Malamute — Anatolian Shepherd Dog — Bernese Mountain Dog — Black Russian Terrier — Boxer — Bullmastiff — Doberman Pinscher — German Pinscher — Giant Schnauzer — Great Dane — Great Pyrenees — Greater Swiss Mountain Dog — Komondor — Kuvasz — Mastiff — Neapolitan Mastiff — Newfoundland — Portuguese Water Dog — Rottweiler — Saint Bernard — Samoyed — Siberian Husky — Standard Schnauzer — Terrier Breeds — Airedale Terrier — American Staffordshire Terrier — Australian Terrier — Bedlington Terrier — Border Terrier — Bull Terrier — Cairn Terrier — Dandie Dinmont Terrier — Smooth Fox Terrier — Wire Fox Terrier — Glen of Imaal Terrier — Irish Terrier — Kerry Blue Terrier — Lakeland Terrier — Manchester Terrier — Miniature Bull Terrier — Miniature Schnauzer — Norfolk Terrier — Norwich Terrier — Parson Russell Terrier — Scottish Terrier — Sealyham Terrier — Skye Terrier — Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier — Staffordshire Bull Terrier — Welsh Terrier — Weat Highland White Terrier — Toy Breeds — Affenpinscher — Brussels Griffon — Cavalier King Charles Spaniel — Chihuahua — Chinese Crested — English Toy Spaniel — Havanese — Italian Greyhound — Japanese Chin — Maltese — Manchester Terrier (Toy) — Miniature Pinscher — Papillon — Pekingese — Pomeranian — Poodle (Toy) — Pug — Shih Tzu — Silky Terrier — Toy Fox Terrier — Yorkshire Terrier — Non-Sporting Breeds — American Eskimo Dog — Bichon Frise — Boston Terrier — Bulldog — Chinese Shar-Pei — Chow Chow — Dalmatian — Finnish Spitz — French Bulldog — Keeshond — Lhasa Apso — Lowchen — Poodle (Miniature and Standard) — Schipperke — Shiba Inu — Tibetan Spaniel — Tibetan Terrier — Herding Breeds — Australian Cattle Dog — Australian Shepherd — Bearded Collie — Belgian Malinois — Belgian Sheepdog — Belgian Tervuren — Border Collie — Bouvier des Flandres — Briard — Canaan Dog — Cardigan Welsh Corgi — Collie — German Shepherd Dog — Old English Sheepdog — Pembroke Welsh Corgi — Polish Lowland Sheepdog — Puli — Shetland Sheepdog — The Miscellaneous Class — Beauceron — Plott — Redbone Coonhound — Swedish Valhund — Tibetan Mastiff — Living With Your Dog — Joining a Dog Club — The Sport of Dogs — Training — Grooming — Responsible Breeding — Canine Health and First Aid — A Healthy Dog — Nutrition — Common Illnesses — Canine First Aid.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307416995
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Subject:
Pets : Dogs - General
Edited by:
American Kennel Club
Author:
The American Kennel Club
Author:
American Kennel Club
Author:
American Kennel Club
Subject:
Pets : Reference
Subject:
Dogs - General
Subject:
Dogs - Breeds
Subject:
Dogs
Subject:
Dog breeds
Subject:
Pets; Dog breeds
Subject:
PETS / Dogs / General
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20060131
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
858

Related Subjects

Pets » Dogs » Dogs by Breed
Pets » Dogs » General
Pets » General

The Complete Dog Book: 20th Edition
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 858 pages Random House Publishing Group - English 9780307416995 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Describes the official breed standards for the 153 different breeds recognized by the American Kennel Club, offering a history and photo of each breed, covering such topics as choosing the right dog, dog obedience, training, health care and first aid.
"Synopsis" by , For more than seventy-five years, The Complete Dog Book has been the premier reference on purebred dogs. Now in its twentieth edition, this treasured guide is an essential volume for every dog owner and owner-to-be.

Comprehensive and thoughtfully organized, The Complete Dog Book features all 153 breeds recognized by the American Kennel Club, the official breed standards, breed histories, and photographs. Also included are the twelve most recently recognized breeds: Anatolian Shepherd Dog, Black Russian Terrier, German Pinscher, Glen of Imaal Terrier, Havanese, Löwchen, Neapolitan Mastiff, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, Parson Russell Terrier, Polish Lowland Sheepdog, Spinone Italiano, and Toy Fox Terrier.

Along with AKC registration procedures and current forms, The Complete Dog Book includes sections on

• choosing the dog that’s right for you

• training

• nutrition

• grooming

• responsible breeding

• canine first-aid

• joining a dog club

• Canine Good Citizen® program

• every AKC sport: Agility, Conformation, Coonhound, Earthdog, Field Trials, Herding, Hunt Tests, Junior Showmanship, Lure Coursing, Obedience, Rally, and Tracking

Concluding with an extensive glossary of terms and line drawings, The Complete Dog Book is a reference that dog aficionados will turn to again and again.

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