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The King's Confidante: The Story of the Daughter of Sir Thomas More

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The King's Confidante: The Story of the Daughter of Sir Thomas More Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

1

"And who is this man who dares oppose us?" demanded the King. "Who is this Thomas More? Eh? Answer me that."

The King was angry. He sat very straight in the royal chair, one slender hand lying on the purple velvet, which covered the table, the other stroking the ermine, which covered his mantle. He was battling to subdue his rage, to preserve his habitual calm; for he was a shrewd man and his life had taught him that unheated words were more effective than the sword.

He looked from one to the other of the two men who sat with him at the velvet-covered table where lay the documents which had absorbed their attention until the entrance of the man Tyler.

"You, Empson You, Dudley Tell me this: Who is this man More?"

"Methinks I have heard his name, Your Grace," said Sir Edmund Dudley. "But I know him not."

"We should be more careful whom we allow to be elected as our London burgesses."

"Indeed yes, Your Grace," agreed Sir Richard Empson.

The King's fury was getting the better of him. He was glaring distastefully at Master Tyler, that gentleman of the Privy Chamber who had brought the news; and it was not this king's habit to blame men for the news they brought. Tyler trembled; he was fervently wishing that he had allowed someone else to acquaint the King with the news that his Parliament--owing to the pithily-worded arguments of one of the youngest burgesses--had refused to grant him the sum of money for which he had asked.

There was one other in the room of the palace of Richmond, and he--a boy of thirteen--was staring idly out of the window watching a barge on the river, wishing he were the gallant who accompanied the fair young lady as they went gaily on to Hampton; he could see them well, for his eyesight was keen. The sun was shining on the water, which was almost the same color as the dress of the young lady. This Prince was already fond of ladies, and they were fond of him. Although young as yet, he was already as tall as many men and showed promise of shooting up to great stature. His skin was fair and his hair had a tinge of red in it so that it shone like the gold ornaments on his clothes.

Now he had forgotten the young lady; he wished to be playing tennis, beating any who challenged him, listening to the compliments they paid, pretending not to hear, while they pretended not to know he listened. For two years he had been aware of such adulation; and how could he, who so loved adulation, feel really sorry that his brother had died? He had loved Arthur; he had admired him as his elder brother; but it was as though he had lost a coarse frieze garment and, because of his loss, found himself the possessor of a doublet of velvet and cloth of gold.

He was conscious that he was a prince who would one day be a king.

And when I am, he told himself, I shall not sit in council with such mumping oafs as Master Dudley and Master Empson. I shall not worry my head with the hoarding of money, but the spending of it. I shall have merry men about me--fat spenders, not lean misers.

"And you, my son," he heard his father say, "what of you? Have you heard aught of this fellow More?"

The boy rose and came to the table to stand in homage before the King.

My son pondered the King. What a king he will make What resemblance he bears to the hated House of York I see his grandfather, Edward of Yor

Synopsis:

The inimitable Plaidy continues her Novels of the Tudors by taking readers into the life of Sir Thomas More, a man torn between devotion to religion and duty to state.

Synopsis:

An English lawyer and statesman, Sir Thomas More was a kind father who put as much emphasis on educating his daughters as on his son, declaring that women were just as intelligent as men. His favorite daughter, Meg, is the heroine of this novel in which we witness the everyday lives of people in Tudor England. Plaidy takes readers into a world far removed from the grandeur of the courts, into the home of a simple family and a caring father who only wants to do what is morally best–not just for his family, but for England.

As secretary and personal adviser to King Henry VIII, More becomes increasingly influential in the government, welcoming foreign diplomats, drafting official documents, and serving as a liaison between the king and the Archbishop of York. His own household stands in startling contrast to the licentious Tudor court, but as lord chancellor he gains recognition and becomes indispensable to the king. More’s love of faith surpasses his duty to the crown, and his refusal to accept King Henry VIII’s claim to be supreme head of the Church of England ends his political career...and leads to his trial for treason.

About the Author

\JEAN PLAIDY is the pen name of the prolific English author Eleanor Hibbert, also know as Victoria Holt. The King’s Confidante is the fourth book in her nine-book series on the Tudors. For more information on Jean Plaidy, visit www.CrownHistorical.com.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307452627
Subtitle:
The Story of the Daughter of Sir Thomas More
Publisher:
Crown Publishing Group
Author:
Plaidy, Jean
Author:
Jean Plaidy
Subject:
Fiction : Historical - General
Subject:
Historical - General
Subject:
Fathers and daughters
Subject:
History
Subject:
Historical fiction
Subject:
Biographical fiction
Subject:
Historical
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20090407
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
307

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The King's Confidante: The Story of the Daughter of Sir Thomas More
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Product details 307 pages Crown Publishing Group - English 9780307452627 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , The inimitable Plaidy continues her Novels of the Tudors by taking readers into the life of Sir Thomas More, a man torn between devotion to religion and duty to state.
"Synopsis" by , An English lawyer and statesman, Sir Thomas More was a kind father who put as much emphasis on educating his daughters as on his son, declaring that women were just as intelligent as men. His favorite daughter, Meg, is the heroine of this novel in which we witness the everyday lives of people in Tudor England. Plaidy takes readers into a world far removed from the grandeur of the courts, into the home of a simple family and a caring father who only wants to do what is morally best–not just for his family, but for England.

As secretary and personal adviser to King Henry VIII, More becomes increasingly influential in the government, welcoming foreign diplomats, drafting official documents, and serving as a liaison between the king and the Archbishop of York. His own household stands in startling contrast to the licentious Tudor court, but as lord chancellor he gains recognition and becomes indispensable to the king. More’s love of faith surpasses his duty to the crown, and his refusal to accept King Henry VIII’s claim to be supreme head of the Church of England ends his political career...and leads to his trial for treason.

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