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    Richard Bausch 9780307266262

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Autobiography of a One-Year-Old

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Autobiography of a One-Year-Old Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Month XIII

In which, if you believe the books, I should be able to get into a standing position, clap hands and indicate wants in ways other than crying. Yeah, right.

PARENTS. A FEW THOUGHTS ON THE THORNY SUBJECT OF

Essentially parents are odd fish. Their ways are mysterious and many of their ideas are just plain bizarre. I'm not sure what the point of them is, but, like junk mail or a sniffle in winter, they are exceedingly hard to avoid; parents come with the territory. Standard issue is two, though one is fairly common, and three or four not unknown. I myself have in my employ two parents of the usual variety.

If you, like me, have a duo of parents, they normally fall into two distinct categories. The first category is Smooth, the second is Hairy. Smooths tend to be full-time staff, whereas Hairies are, at best, part-timers. Some people I've met claim their Hairies do equal if not more hours than their Smooths, but frankly I find that a little hard to believe. Smooths also tend to handle more of the refueling functions and the nether-region work.

Now, because I spend more of my time with Smooth, the appearance of Hairy, when it occurs, is a situation that can be exploited in many ways. Prime among these is the ruse of spending most of the day in dispute with Smooth, then being all smiles and cuddles when Hairy turns up. It's a divide-and-rule ploy that never fails to produce results. I know it sounds a little devious, but it's one of the few chances you have of outmaneuvering parents who so often hold the upper hand.

And that is the nub of the parent conundrum.

You see, although the parents are undoubtedly working for me, by some ludicrous twist of fate, they have been put in charge. It is a position they are so patently ill equipped to handle that it leaves you with the disquieting feeling that you are the victim of some monstrous mistake. I mean, they know so little about me and the world I inhabit that it's hardly surprising so many of the decisions they make about me are completely wrong.

For instance, no one likes cereal. Absolutely no one. That's why, given a choice, at breakfast people eat cornflakes or toast or a croissant or pancakes or bacon and eggs. So how come I'm force-fed cereal every morning?

Or what about the things they put in my crib? Some nights I get in and it’s like trying to find a seat in an overcrowded train. Okay, I admit that by now I know some of the fellows who share my crib, but honestly I really know most of them only slightly. For heaven's sake, I’m trying to sleep in here, don't I deserve a little space of my own?

The bitter truth is that parents are in charge. So, one way or another, you have to discover your own way of getting along with them.

The spectrum of possible strategies you can employ ranges from total deference, through collaboration, to outright war. My advice is, don't put all your toys in one toy box. Vary your approach. It'll keep you interested and them on their toes. Just because they’re in charge doesn’t mean you can’t be in control.

WHAT’S IN A NAME?

They say the Eskimos have hundreds of words for types of snow. Pathetic.

I've loads more than that for types of poop. When the stuff is such a big part in your life, you tend to dwell on the subject. And all too often you don't just dwell on

Synopsis:

An entertaining glimpse inside the world of a one-year-old child explores a youngster's view of life and discovery as a baby discusses mirrors, hands, nursery rhymes, crying, diapers, food, and more. Reprint.

Synopsis:

“I am a one-year-old and this is my autobiography....”

Have you ever looked at your baby and wondered what he or she is thinking? Are you ready to find out?

“I thought it was about time someone told it like it is. So I’m spilling the beans on the world of a one-year-old. A world where you’re left in the charge of totally inept parents. Where everything’s at completely the wrong height. Where you’re not allowed to splash in the bath but you are in the pool. Where nobody understands a single word you say. And where diapers and poop loom large at every turn.

“It’s a roller-coaster ride through one heck of a year. I’ve laughed a lot, I’ve cried a lot, I’ve learned a lot. And so will you. You might even discover the answer to that age-old question: Humpty Dumpty — did he fall or was he pushed?

“Anyway, must run. I see a bowl of tepid gloop is being spooned out for me. What joy.”

Welcome to the wonderful world of your one-year-old.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307481771
Publisher:
Bantam Books
Subject:
Family & Relationships : Health - Nutrition
Author:
Candappa, Rohan
Author:
Rohan Candappa
Subject:
Family & Relationships : Life Stages - Infants & Toddlers/Ge
Subject:
Infants
Subject:
Infants & Toddlers
Subject:
General
Subject:
Infants & Toddlers - General
Subject:
Humorous
Subject:
Humorous fiction
Subject:
Child Care and Parenting-General
Subject:
Humor : General
Subject:
Self-Help : General
Subject:
Family & Relationships : Life Stages - Infants & Toddlers -
Subject:
Biography & Autobiography : Personal Memoirs
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20010828
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
288

Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Family
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » General
Health and Self-Help » Child Care and Parenting » Infancy and Toddlerhood

Autobiography of a One-Year-Old
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Product details 288 pages Random House Publishing Group - English 9780307481771 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , An entertaining glimpse inside the world of a one-year-old child explores a youngster's view of life and discovery as a baby discusses mirrors, hands, nursery rhymes, crying, diapers, food, and more. Reprint.
"Synopsis" by , “I am a one-year-old and this is my autobiography....”

Have you ever looked at your baby and wondered what he or she is thinking? Are you ready to find out?

“I thought it was about time someone told it like it is. So I’m spilling the beans on the world of a one-year-old. A world where you’re left in the charge of totally inept parents. Where everything’s at completely the wrong height. Where you’re not allowed to splash in the bath but you are in the pool. Where nobody understands a single word you say. And where diapers and poop loom large at every turn.

“It’s a roller-coaster ride through one heck of a year. I’ve laughed a lot, I’ve cried a lot, I’ve learned a lot. And so will you. You might even discover the answer to that age-old question: Humpty Dumpty — did he fall or was he pushed?

“Anyway, must run. I see a bowl of tepid gloop is being spooned out for me. What joy.”

Welcome to the wonderful world of your one-year-old.

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