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The Other Side of Air: A Novel

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The Other Side of Air: A Novel Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

One

Now that I have died, I see all and know all, and there's nothing I can do about it. Before, the frustration would’ve been intolerable, but the instruction would've been the same-let things go from your hands, watch them land where they will and be glad, be decent and do your best, take care of those who love you, make your bed, do the nastiest job of the day first-no lessons that require divine revelation, you see, only common sense, nothing supernatural. Consider how jangled the world would be if our judgment from beyond continued to mean anything. Not to say that having the power to reach down into lives to lift burdens and simplify sticky situations wouldn't be thrilling. From all indications, though, it wouldn’t be the best use of a brief allotment of time and imaginative longing to consider our leaving as anything other than a final journey. And take a tip- memories are all we're capable of offering in the way of influence.

People who have loved us tend to leave the rooms we lie in committed to do more, see more, and so be able to die sometime in the distant future with more honor and fewer regrets than they believe we took with us. They can wonder so intently at the meaning of it all that an answer which may have been stranded inside them, abandoned, or atrophied from disuse will finally, suddenly, make itself heard. Despite their conviction that intimations of how to live better lives felt far too urgent and true to have arisen from any ordinary thing, lessons that matter always come on the heels of the simple act of remembering words and acts of love given to them by the person they've had to close the door on.

Mothers and wives are naturally inclined to notice large and small improvements individuals could be making in their lives, but it doesn't take death to prove the futility of trying to coordinate people to behave according to directions you prefer, or to believe what you know to be an indisputable truth. A living, even partially alert mother knows the limits of her ability to change a mind if she happens to have a grown child like mine who turns away from any evidence that his successes would be less impressive were it not for his parents' willingness to get up at dawn and work until dark. Specific memories of love, though, once they begin coming in through the grieving, are invariably dependable revelations, which can be trusted to finish transformations we weren't able to see completed.

Living in love for seventy-three years kept me immune to a great deal of frustration. From the instant in 1925 when the eight-year-old boy who would eventually be my husband squinted up from a mud hole he was stirring with a long stick on the long dirt road that passed by my house and his outside Rome, Georgia, adoration contained all the possibilities of freedom and trust. Our first conversation was chiefly made up of debate over why a new girl who'd just moved from Athens, a college town even small children learned to disparage, felt righteous enough to suggest that he was going to drive the stick up into his head if he continued to pick his dirty nose with it.

He said I seemed like a person who liked to dictate. You look like them that like to try out to be the boss of somebody, but I got a mama, though she don't smile correcting.

I always smile,” I told him, “when I’m do

Synopsis:

Aware that she has little time left, Katy Doyal makes arrangements for caring for Ephraim, her husband of nearly sixty years, hiring sassy Rose to help put the grieving Doyal household in order after her death, but her plans are threatened by the arrival of her disapproving son Wyatt and his unhappy wife. Reader's Guide included. Original. 35,000 first printing.

Synopsis:

One

Now that I have died, I see all and know all, and there's nothing I can do about it. Before, the frustration would've been intolerable, but the instruction would've been the same--let things go from your hands, watch them land where they will and be glad, be decent and do your best, take care of those who love you, make your bed, do the nastiest job of the day first--no lessons that require divine revelation, you see, only common sense, nothing supernatural. Consider how jangled the world would be if our judgment from beyond continued to mean anything. Not to say that having the power to reach down into lives to lift burdens and simplify sticky situations wouldn't be thrilling. From all indications, though, it wouldn't be the best use of a brief allotment of time and imaginative longing to consider our leaving as anything other than a final journey. And take a tip-- memories are all we're capable of offer

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307489203
Subtitle:
A Novel
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Author:
Braselton, Jeanne
Author:
Jeanne Braselton
Subject:
Fiction : General
Subject:
General
Subject:
Fathers and sons
Subject:
Caregivers
Subject:
Care of the sick
Subject:
Future life
Subject:
California
Subject:
Georgia
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20060829
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
185

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Other Side of Air: A Novel
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 185 pages Random House Publishing Group - English 9780307489203 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Aware that she has little time left, Katy Doyal makes arrangements for caring for Ephraim, her husband of nearly sixty years, hiring sassy Rose to help put the grieving Doyal household in order after her death, but her plans are threatened by the arrival of her disapproving son Wyatt and his unhappy wife. Reader's Guide included. Original. 35,000 first printing.
"Synopsis" by , One

Now that I have died, I see all and know all, and there's nothing I can do about it. Before, the frustration would've been intolerable, but the instruction would've been the same--let things go from your hands, watch them land where they will and be glad, be decent and do your best, take care of those who love you, make your bed, do the nastiest job of the day first--no lessons that require divine revelation, you see, only common sense, nothing supernatural. Consider how jangled the world would be if our judgment from beyond continued to mean anything. Not to say that having the power to reach down into lives to lift burdens and simplify sticky situations wouldn't be thrilling. From all indications, though, it wouldn't be the best use of a brief allotment of time and imaginative longing to consider our leaving as anything other than a final journey. And take a tip-- memories are all we're capable of offer

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