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Spice: The History of a Temptation

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Spice: The History of a Temptation Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Chapter 1 .

The Spice Seekers

The Taste That Launched a Thousand Ships

According to an old Catalan tradition, the news of the New World was formally announced in the Salóoacute; del Tinell, the cavernous, barrel-vaulted banquet hall in Barcelona's Barri Gòograve;tic, the city's medieval quarter. And it is largely on tradition we must rely, for aside from a few sparse details the witnesses to the scene had frustratingly little to say, leaving the field free for painters, poets, and Hollywood producers to imagine the moment that marked the watershed, symbolically at least, between medievalism and modernity. They have tended to portray a setting of suitable grandeur, with king and queen presiding over an assembly of everyone who was anyone in the kingdom: counts and dukes weighed down by jewels, ermines, and velvets; mitered bishops; courtiers stiff in their robes of state; serried ranks of pages sweating in livery. Ambassadors and dignitaries from foreign powers look on in astonishment and with mixed emotions-awe, confusion, and envy. Before them stands Christopher Columbus in triumph, vindicated at last, courier of the ecosystem's single biggest piece of news since the ending of the Ice Age. The universe has just been reconfigured.

Or so we now know. But the details are largely the work of historical imagination, the perspective one of the advantages of having half a millennium to digest the news. The view from 1493 was less panoramic; indeed, altogether more foggy. It is late April, the exact day unknown. Columbus is indeed back from America, but he is oblivious to the fact. His version of events is that he has just been to the Indies, and though the tale he has to tell might have been lifted straight from a medieval romance, he has the proof to silence any who would doubt him: gold, green, and yellow parrots, Indians, and cinnamon.

At least that is what Columbus believed. His gold was indeed gold, if in no great quantity, and his parrots were indeed parrots, albeit not of any Asian variety. Likewise his Indians: the six bewildered individuals who shuffled forward to be inspected by the assembled company were not Indians but Caribs, a race soon to be exterminated by the Spanish colonizers and by the deadlier still germs they carried. The misnomer Columbus conferred has long outlived the misconception.

In the case of the cinnamon Columbus's capricious labeling would not stick for nearly so long. A witness reported that the twigs did indeed look a little like cinnamon but tasted more pungent than pepper and smelled like cloves-or was it ginger? Equally perplexing, and most uncharacteristically for a spice, his sample had gone off during the voyage back-the unhappy consequence, as Columbus explained, of his poor harvesting technique. But in due course time would reveal a simpler solution to the mystery, and one that the skeptics perhaps guessed even then: that his "cinnamon" was in fact nothing any spicier than the bark of an unidentified Caribbean tree. Like the Indies he imagined he had visited, his cinnamon was the fruit of faulty assumptions and an overcharged imagination. For all his pains Columbus had ended up half a planet from the real thing.

In April 1493, his wayward botany amounted to a failure either too bizarre or, for those whose money was at stake, too deflating to contemplate. As every schoolchild knows (or should know), when Columbus bumped in

Synopsis:

A history of the pursuit and use of spices notes how major voyages of discovery were linked to the spice trade, discussing the role of spices in the forging of relations between Europe and Asia and depicting spices as food enhancers, archaeological clues, aphrodisiacs, and more. Reprint. 17,500 first printing.

Synopsis:

Jack Turner was born in Sydney, Australia, in 1968. He received his B.A. in Classical Studies from Melbourne University and his Ph.D. in International Relations from Oxford, where he was a Rhodes Scholar and MacArthur Foundation Junior Research Fellow. He lives with his wife, Helena, and their son in Geneva. This is his first book.

Table of Contents

I The Spice Race - 1. The Spice Seekers - II Palate - 2. Ancient Appetites - 3. Medieval Europe - III Body - 4. The Spice of Life - 5. The Spice of Love - IV Spirit - 6. Food of the Gods - 7. Some Like it Bland - Epilogue - The End of the Spice Age.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307491220
Subtitle:
The History of a Temptation
Publisher:
Vintage
Author:
Turner, Jack
Author:
Jack Turner
Subject:
History : World - General
Subject:
World - General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Specific Ingredients - Herbs, Spices, Condiments
Subject:
Spice trade -- History.
Subject:
Spices -- History.
Subject:
World
Subject:
Cooking and Food-Historical Food and Cooking
Subject:
World History-General
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20050809
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
384

Related Subjects

Business » General
Cooking and Food » By Ingredient » Herbs and Spices
Cooking and Food » Reference and Etiquette » Historical Food and Cooking
History and Social Science » World History » General

Spice: The History of a Temptation
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$ In Stock
Product details 384 pages Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group - English 9780307491220 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A history of the pursuit and use of spices notes how major voyages of discovery were linked to the spice trade, discussing the role of spices in the forging of relations between Europe and Asia and depicting spices as food enhancers, archaeological clues, aphrodisiacs, and more. Reprint. 17,500 first printing.
"Synopsis" by , Jack Turner was born in Sydney, Australia, in 1968. He received his B.A. in Classical Studies from Melbourne University and his Ph.D. in International Relations from Oxford, where he was a Rhodes Scholar and MacArthur Foundation Junior Research Fellow. He lives with his wife, Helena, and their son in Geneva. This is his first book.
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