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The Invisible Bridge

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The Invisible Bridge Cover

 

Staff Pick

The Invisible Bridge is jaw-droppingly impressive. Orringer is a hugely talented writer, able to wrangle epic themes — love and war, tragedy and redemption — and tame them with her deft, evocative prose. Her debut novel is cinematic, heart-wrenching, and utterly alive with sensory detail. I implore you: don't miss it.
Recommended by Sheila A., Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

CHAPTER ONE

A Letter

Later he would tell her that their story began at the Royal Hungarian Opera House, the night before he left for Paris on the Western Europe Express. The year was 1937; the month was September, the evening unseasonably cold. His brother had insisted on taking him to the opera as a parting gift. The show was Tosca and their seats were at the top of the house. Not for them the three marble-arched doorways, the façade with its Corinthian columns and heroic entablature. Theirs was a humble side entrance with a red-faced ticket taker, a floor of scuffed wood, walls plastered with crumbling opera posters. Girls in knee-length dresses climbed the stairs arm in arm with young men in threadbare suits; pensioners argued with their white-haired wives as they shuffled up the five narrow flights. At the top, a joyful din: a refreshment salon lined with mirrors and wooden benches, the air hazy with cigarette smoke. A doorway at its far end opened onto the concert hall itself, the great electric-lit cavern of it, with its ceiling fresco of Greek immortals and its gold-scrolled tiers. Andras had never expected to see an opera here, nor would he have if Tibor hadn’t bought the tickets. But it was Tibor’s opinion that residence in Budapest must include at least one evening of Puccini at the Operaház. Now Tibor leaned over the rail to point out Admiral Horthy’s box, empty that night except for an ancient general in a hussar’s jacket. Far below, tuxedoed ushers led men and women to their seats, the men in evening dress, the women’s hair glittering with jewels.

“If only Mátyás could see this,” Andras said.

“He’ll see it, Andráska. He’ll come to Budapest when he’s got his baccalaureate, and in a year he’ll be sick to death of this place.”

Andras had to smile. He and Tibor had both moved to Budapest as soon as they graduated from gimnázium in Debrecen. They had all grown up in Konyár, a tiny village in the eastern flatlands, and to them, too, the capital city had once seemed like the center of the world. Now Tibor had plans to go to medical college in Italy, and Andras, who had lived here for only a year, was leaving for school in Paris. Until the news from the École Spéciale d’Architecture, they had all thought Tibor would be the first to go. For the past three years he’d been working as a salesclerk in a shoe store on Váci utca, saving money for his tuition and poring over his medical textbooks at night as desperately as if he were trying to save his own life. When Andras had moved in with him a year earlier, Tibor’s departure had seemed imminent. He had already passed his exams and submitted his application to the medical school at Modena. He thought it might take six months to get his acceptance and student visa. Instead the medical college had placed him on a waiting list for foreign students, and he’d been told it might be another year or two before he could matriculate.

Tibor hadn’t said a word about his own situation since Andras had learned of his scholarship, nor had he shown a trace of envy. Instead he had bought these opera tickets and helped Andras make his plans. Now, as the lights dimmed and the orchestra began to tune, Andras was visited by a private shame: Though he knew he would have bee

Synopsis:

A historical novel set in 1937 Europe tells the story of three Hungarian Jewish brothers bound by history and love, of a marriage tested by disaster, of a Jewish family's struggle against annihilation by the Nazis and of the dangerous power of art in the time of war.

Synopsis:

Julie Orringer’s astonishing first novel—eagerly awaited since the publication of her heralded best-selling short-story

collection, How to Breathe Underwater (“Fiercely beautiful”—The New York Times)—is a grand love story and an epic tale of three brothers whose lives are torn apart by war.

Paris, 1937. Andras Lévi, a Hungarian Jewish architecture student, arrives from Budapest with a scholarship, a single suitcase, and a mysterious letter he has promised to deliver to C. Morgenstern on the rue de Sévigné. As he becomes involved with the letter’s recipient, his elder brother takes up medical studies in Modena, their younger brother leaves school for the stage—and Europe’s unfolding tragedy sends each of their lives into terrifying uncertainty. From the Hungarian village of Konyár to the grand opera houses of Budapest and Paris, from the lonely chill of Andras’s garret to the enduring passion he discovers on the rue de Sévigné, from the despair of a Carpathian winter to an unimaginable life in forced labor camps and beyond, The Invisible Bridge tells the unforgettable story of brothers bound by history and love, of a marriage tested by disaster, of a Jewish family’s struggle against annihilation, and of the dangerous power of art in a time of war.

About the Author

Julie Orringer is the author of the award-winning short-story collection How to Breathe Underwater, which was a New York Times Notable Book. She is the winner of The Paris Review’s Discovery Prize and the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Stanford University, and the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library. She lives in Brooklyn, where she is researching a new novel.

Table of Contents

Part One: The Street of Schools — A Letter — The Western Europe Express — The Quartier Latin — Ecole Speciale — Theatre Sarah-Bernhardt — Work — A Luncheon — Gare D'Orsay — Bois de Vincennes — Rue de Sevigne — Winter Holiday — Part Two: Broken Glass — What Happened at the Studio — Visitor — A Haircut — In the Tuileries — The Stone Cottage — Synagogue de la Victoire — Caf

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307593719
Publisher:
Alfred A. Knopf
Subject:
Juvenile Fiction : Lifestyles - Farm Life & Ranch Life
Author:
Orringer, Julie
Author:
Julie Orringer
Subject:
Fiction : Literary
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Love stories
Subject:
Brothers
Subject:
Audio Books-Literature
Subject:
Children s-General
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20100504
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
602

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Jewish
Fiction and Poetry » Popular Fiction » Military

The Invisible Bridge
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 602 pages Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group - English 9780307593719 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

The Invisible Bridge is jaw-droppingly impressive. Orringer is a hugely talented writer, able to wrangle epic themes — love and war, tragedy and redemption — and tame them with her deft, evocative prose. Her debut novel is cinematic, heart-wrenching, and utterly alive with sensory detail. I implore you: don't miss it.

"Synopsis" by , A historical novel set in 1937 Europe tells the story of three Hungarian Jewish brothers bound by history and love, of a marriage tested by disaster, of a Jewish family's struggle against annihilation by the Nazis and of the dangerous power of art in the time of war.
"Synopsis" by , Julie Orringer’s astonishing first novel—eagerly awaited since the publication of her heralded best-selling short-story

collection, How to Breathe Underwater (“Fiercely beautiful”—The New York Times)—is a grand love story and an epic tale of three brothers whose lives are torn apart by war.

Paris, 1937. Andras Lévi, a Hungarian Jewish architecture student, arrives from Budapest with a scholarship, a single suitcase, and a mysterious letter he has promised to deliver to C. Morgenstern on the rue de Sévigné. As he becomes involved with the letter’s recipient, his elder brother takes up medical studies in Modena, their younger brother leaves school for the stage—and Europe’s unfolding tragedy sends each of their lives into terrifying uncertainty. From the Hungarian village of Konyár to the grand opera houses of Budapest and Paris, from the lonely chill of Andras’s garret to the enduring passion he discovers on the rue de Sévigné, from the despair of a Carpathian winter to an unimaginable life in forced labor camps and beyond, The Invisible Bridge tells the unforgettable story of brothers bound by history and love, of a marriage tested by disaster, of a Jewish family’s struggle against annihilation, and of the dangerous power of art in a time of war.

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