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I Remember Nothing: And Other Reflections

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I Remember Nothing: And Other Reflections Cover

ISBN13: 9780307595607
ISBN10: 0307595609
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
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Staff Pick

The essays in Ephron's charming collection range from the very relatable (vignettes covering everything from egg yolks to Thomas Friedman) to the delightful and personal (as in "Journalism: A Love Story," which recounts her post-college days in a largely male-dominated profession), and all are filled with humor, wit, and the perfect sprinkling of self-deprecation and vitriol.
Recommended by Ann E., Powells.com

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Nora Ephron returns with her first book since the astounding success of I Feel Bad About My Neck, taking a cold, hard, hilarious look at the past, the present, and the future, bemoaning the vicissitudes of modern life, and recalling with her signature clarity and wisdom everything she hasn't (yet) forgotten.

Even as she's listing What I Won't Miss and What I Will Miss — making the final tally — Ephron reaches back to recount falling hard for a way of life (Journalism: A Love Story) and breaking up even harder with the men in her life (The D Word), a long-anticipated inheritance with entirely unanticipated results (My Life as an Heiress), and the evolution, a decade after she wrote and directed You've Got Mail, of her relationship with her in-box (The Six Stages of E-mail). All the while, she gives candid, charming voice to everything women who have reached a certain age have been thinking... but have rarely acknowledged.

Filled with insights and observations that instantly ring true — and could have come only from Nora Ephron — I Remember Nothing is a pure delight.

Review:

"Reading these succinct, razor-sharp essays by veteran humorist (I Feel Bad About My Neck), novelist, and screenwriter-director Ephron is to be reminded that she cut her teeth as a New York Post writer in the 1960s, as she recounts in the most substantial selection here, 'Journalism: A Love Story.' Forthright, frequently wickedly backhanded, these essays cover the gamut of later-life observations (she is 69), from the dourly hilarious title essay about losing her memory, which asserts that her ubiquitous senior moment has now become the requisite Google moment, to several flimsy lists, such as 'Twenty-five Things People Have a Shocking Capacity to Be Surprised by Over and Over Again,' e.g., 'Movies have no political effect whatsoever.' Shorts such as the several 'I Just Want to Say' pieces feature Ephron's trademark prickly contrariness and are stylistically digestible for the tabloids. Other essays delve into memories of fascinating people she knew, such as the Lillian Hellman of Pentimento, whom she adored until the older woman's egomania rubbed her the wrong way. Most winning, however, are her priceless reflections on her early life, such as growing up in Beverly Hills with her movie-people parents, and how being divorced shaped the bulk of her life, in 'The D Word.' There's an elegiac quality to many of these pieces, handled with wit and tenderness. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)

Review:

"Succinct, razor-sharp...forthright, wickedly backhanded...handled with wit & tenderness." Publishers Weekly

Review:

"Delicious." More Magazine

Review:

"Whether she takes on bizarre hair problems, culinary disasters, an addiction to online Scrabble, the persistent pain of a divorce, or that mean old devil, age, Ephron is candid, self-deprecating, laser-smart, and hilarious." Booklist

Review:

"[Ephron]'s familiar but funny, boldly outspoken yet simultaneously reassuring." New York Times

Review:

"Luck, hard work, privilege, yes, yes, yes. But tremendous talent is her forte, her strong suit, her fiendish trump card." Washington Post

Review:

"[Ephron] has not lost her ability to zero in on modern life's little mysteries.... As for the essay about remembering nothing..., it's one that millions of aging Americans will relate to." USA Today

Synopsis:

The perfect holiday gift: a pair of hilarious books from the “wickedly witty and astute” Nora Ephron, a “crackling smart cultural scribe” (The Boston Globe) whose insights and observations have made her a heroine to women all over America.

Critics and readers embraced the nationwide best seller I Feel Bad About My Neck—“Marvelous” (The Washington Post); “Sparkling” (Ladies Home Journal); “Delightful” (The New York Review of Books)—and applauded Ephron for “mak[ing] the truth about life so funny” (The Sunday Times, London). In I Remember Nothing the beloved humorist returns with more razor-sharp reflections on growing older in the twenty-first century, along with those stories from the past she hasnt (yet) forgotten.

I Feel Bad About My Neck

and Other Thoughts on Being a Woman

With her disarming, intimate, completely accessible voice and dry sense of humor, Ephron shares with us her ups and downs in this wise, wonderful look at women of a certain age who are dealing with the tribulations of maintenance, menopause, empty nests, and everything in between. Ephron chronicles her life as an obsessed cook, a passionate city dweller, and a hapless parent. But mostly she speaks frankly and uproariously about getting older. Utterly courageous, unexpectedly moving, and laugh-out-loud funny, I Feel Bad About My Neck is a scrumptious, irresistible treat of a book.

I Remember Nothing

and Other Reflections

Ephron takes a cool, hard, hilarious look at the past, the present, and the future, writing about falling hard for a way of life (“Journalism: A Love Story”) and breaking up even harder with the men in her life (“The D Word”); revealing the alarming evolution, a decade after she wrote and directed Youve Got Mail, of her relationship with her in-box (“The Six Stages of E-mail”); and asking the age-old question, which came first, the chicken soup or the cold? All the while, she gives voice to everything women have been thinking . . . but rarely acknowledging. Filled with insights and observations that instantly ring true—and could have come only from Nora Ephron—I Remember Nothing is pure joy.

“[Ephron] retains an uncanny ability to sound like your best friend, whoever you are . . . Some things dont change. Its good to know that Ms. Ephrons wry, knowing X-ray vision is one of them.” —The New York Times

“Nora Ephron has become timeless.” —Los Angeles Times Book Review

About the Author

Nora Ephron is also the author of I Feel Bad About My Neck, Crazy Salad, Scribble Scribble, Wallflower at the Orgy, and Heartburn. She received Academy Award nominations for Best Original Screenplay for When Harry Met Sally, Silkwood, and Sleepless in Seattle, which she also directed. Her other credits include the films Michael, You've Got Mail, and the play Imaginary Friends. She lives in New York City with her husband, writer Nicholas Pileggi.

What Our Readers Are Saying

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Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

writermala, February 17, 2011 (view all comments by writermala)
I really liked this book. So, why and what was it about? "I remember nothing!" Help! Oh that's right that's what the book's title was, "I remember nothing," and many of us 'oldish' women can relate so well to what she has articulated.
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307595607
Author:
Ephron, Nora
Publisher:
Knopf Publishing Group
Subject:
Form - Essays
Subject:
Essays
Subject:
Humor-Anthologies
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20101131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Pages:
160
Dimensions:
14 x 10.5 x 2 in 1.65 lb

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Related Subjects

Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Anthologies
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » General
Arts and Entertainment » Humor » Narrative
Biography » General
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z
Fiction and Poetry » Literature » Featured Titles

I Remember Nothing: And Other Reflections Used Hardcover
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$7.95 In Stock
Product details 160 pages Knopf Publishing Group - English 9780307595607 Reviews:
"Staff Pick" by ,

The essays in Ephron's charming collection range from the very relatable (vignettes covering everything from egg yolks to Thomas Friedman) to the delightful and personal (as in "Journalism: A Love Story," which recounts her post-college days in a largely male-dominated profession), and all are filled with humor, wit, and the perfect sprinkling of self-deprecation and vitriol.

"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Reading these succinct, razor-sharp essays by veteran humorist (I Feel Bad About My Neck), novelist, and screenwriter-director Ephron is to be reminded that she cut her teeth as a New York Post writer in the 1960s, as she recounts in the most substantial selection here, 'Journalism: A Love Story.' Forthright, frequently wickedly backhanded, these essays cover the gamut of later-life observations (she is 69), from the dourly hilarious title essay about losing her memory, which asserts that her ubiquitous senior moment has now become the requisite Google moment, to several flimsy lists, such as 'Twenty-five Things People Have a Shocking Capacity to Be Surprised by Over and Over Again,' e.g., 'Movies have no political effect whatsoever.' Shorts such as the several 'I Just Want to Say' pieces feature Ephron's trademark prickly contrariness and are stylistically digestible for the tabloids. Other essays delve into memories of fascinating people she knew, such as the Lillian Hellman of Pentimento, whom she adored until the older woman's egomania rubbed her the wrong way. Most winning, however, are her priceless reflections on her early life, such as growing up in Beverly Hills with her movie-people parents, and how being divorced shaped the bulk of her life, in 'The D Word.' There's an elegiac quality to many of these pieces, handled with wit and tenderness. (Nov.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright PWyxz LLC)
"Review" by , "Succinct, razor-sharp...forthright, wickedly backhanded...handled with wit & tenderness."
"Review" by , "Delicious."
"Review" by , "Whether she takes on bizarre hair problems, culinary disasters, an addiction to online Scrabble, the persistent pain of a divorce, or that mean old devil, age, Ephron is candid, self-deprecating, laser-smart, and hilarious."
"Review" by , "[Ephron]'s familiar but funny, boldly outspoken yet simultaneously reassuring."
"Review" by , "Luck, hard work, privilege, yes, yes, yes. But tremendous talent is her forte, her strong suit, her fiendish trump card."
"Review" by , "[Ephron] has not lost her ability to zero in on modern life's little mysteries.... As for the essay about remembering nothing..., it's one that millions of aging Americans will relate to."
"Synopsis" by , The perfect holiday gift: a pair of hilarious books from the “wickedly witty and astute” Nora Ephron, a “crackling smart cultural scribe” (The Boston Globe) whose insights and observations have made her a heroine to women all over America.

Critics and readers embraced the nationwide best seller I Feel Bad About My Neck—“Marvelous” (The Washington Post); “Sparkling” (Ladies Home Journal); “Delightful” (The New York Review of Books)—and applauded Ephron for “mak[ing] the truth about life so funny” (The Sunday Times, London). In I Remember Nothing the beloved humorist returns with more razor-sharp reflections on growing older in the twenty-first century, along with those stories from the past she hasnt (yet) forgotten.

I Feel Bad About My Neck

and Other Thoughts on Being a Woman

With her disarming, intimate, completely accessible voice and dry sense of humor, Ephron shares with us her ups and downs in this wise, wonderful look at women of a certain age who are dealing with the tribulations of maintenance, menopause, empty nests, and everything in between. Ephron chronicles her life as an obsessed cook, a passionate city dweller, and a hapless parent. But mostly she speaks frankly and uproariously about getting older. Utterly courageous, unexpectedly moving, and laugh-out-loud funny, I Feel Bad About My Neck is a scrumptious, irresistible treat of a book.

I Remember Nothing

and Other Reflections

Ephron takes a cool, hard, hilarious look at the past, the present, and the future, writing about falling hard for a way of life (“Journalism: A Love Story”) and breaking up even harder with the men in her life (“The D Word”); revealing the alarming evolution, a decade after she wrote and directed Youve Got Mail, of her relationship with her in-box (“The Six Stages of E-mail”); and asking the age-old question, which came first, the chicken soup or the cold? All the while, she gives voice to everything women have been thinking . . . but rarely acknowledging. Filled with insights and observations that instantly ring true—and could have come only from Nora Ephron—I Remember Nothing is pure joy.

“[Ephron] retains an uncanny ability to sound like your best friend, whoever you are . . . Some things dont change. Its good to know that Ms. Ephrons wry, knowing X-ray vision is one of them.” —The New York Times

“Nora Ephron has become timeless.” —Los Angeles Times Book Review

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