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Debtors' Prison: The Politics of Austerity Versus Possibility

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Debtors' Prison: The Politics of Austerity Versus Possibility Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

One of our foremost economic thinkers challenges a cherished tenet of today’s financial orthodoxy: that spending less, refusing to forgive debt, and shrinking government—“austerity”—is the solution to a persisting economic crisis like ours or Europe’s, now in its fifth year.

Since the collapse of September 2008, the conversation about economic recovery has centered on the question of debt: whether we have too much of it, whose debt to forgive, and how to cut the deficit. These questions dominated the sound bites of the 2012 U.S. presidential election, the fiscal-cliff debates, and the perverse policies of the European Union.

Robert Kuttner makes the most powerful argument to date that these are the wrong questions and that austerity is the wrong answer. Blending economics with historical contrasts of effective debt relief and punitive debt enforcement, he makes clear that universal belt-tightening, as a prescription for recession, defies economic logic. And while the public debt gets most of the attention, it is private debts that crashed the economy and are sandbagging the recovery—mortgages, student loans, consumer borrowing to make up for lagging wages, speculative shortfalls incurred by banks. As Kuttner observes, corporations get to use bankruptcy to walk away from debts. Homeowners and small nations don’t. Thus, we need more public borrowing and investment to revive a depressed economy, and more forgiveness and reform of the overhang of past debts.

In making his case, Kuttner uncovers the double standards in the politics of debt, from Robinson Crusoe author Daniel Defoe’s campaign for debt forgiveness in the seventeenth century to the two world wars and Bretton Woods. Just as debtors’ prisons once prevented individuals from surmounting their debts and resuming productive life, austerity measures shackle, rather than restore, economic growth—as the weight of past debt crushes the economy’s future potential. Above all, Kuttner shows how austerity serves only the interest of creditors—the very bankers and financial elites whose actions precipitated the collapse. Lucid, authoritative, provocative—a book that will shape the economic conversation and the search for new solutions.  

Review:

"Kuttner (The Squandering of America), cofounder and co-editor of the American Prospect, pulls no punches in his latest full-throated defense of Keynesian economics and repudiation of the modern neoliberal system. Kuttner argues that rather than helping countries live within their means, austerity hampers economic growth and prevents recovery. Alternately rousing and oversaturated with statistics, the author nevertheless makes a convincing case that fiscal policy has been hijacked by the vested interests of international finance and the moneyed classes. Every economic crisis over the past several decades has sparked the same two-pronged response of prodigal bailouts of multinational investment banks and crippling strictures on the public sector. These strategies are enforced by elites with no democratic accountability and dangerously little local knowledge. For example, in their negotiations with Greece, the E.U. and the E.C.B. have demanded that the majority of Greek airports be abruptly sold off, a strategy that may raise several million dollars but would create massive social disturbances. When elected Greek officials agree to absurd conditions like these, they are of course voted out of office, while the jobs of the bureaucrats who came up with them remain secure. Kuttner's deft overview of economic history — most notably his coverage of the Marshall Plan — demonstrates that economic stimulus can be very effective at ending recessions. Agent: Amanda Urban, ICM." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Synopsis:

A timely, broadly revisionist, essential book by one of our foremost economic observers takes down one of the most cherished tenets of contemporary financial thinking: that spending less, refusing to forgive debt, and shrinking government--"austerity"--is a solution to the current economic crisis.

Since the collapse of Lehman Brothers in September 2008, too much of our conversation about economic recovery has centered on the question of debt: whether we have too much of it, when to forgive it, and how to cut the deficit. Robert Kuttner makes the most powerful argument to date that these are the wrong questions and that austerity is the wrong solution. Blending economics with historical examples of effective debt relief and punitive debt enforcement, he makes clear that universal belt-tightening, as a prescription for recession, simply defies economic logic. Just as debtor's prisons once prevented individuals from working and thus being able to pay back their debts, austerity measures shackle, rather than restore, economic growth as the weight of past debt crushes the economy's future potential. Above all, Kuttner shows how austerity serves only the interest of creditors--the very bankers and financial elites whose actions precipitated the collapse. Lucid, authoritative, provocative--a book that is certain to be widely read and much debated.

About the Author

ROBERT KUTTNER is cofounder and coeditor of The American Prospect magazine, as well as a Demos Distinguished Senior Fellow, and author of ten books. He was a longtime columnist for BusinessWeek and continues to write columns in The Boston Globe.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780307959805
Author:
Kuttner, Robert
Publisher:
Knopf Publishing Group
Subject:
Business-Banking
Subject:
Banks & Banking
Subject:
Economic Policy
Subject:
Politics - General
Subject:
economics;politics
Publication Date:
20130431
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
352
Dimensions:
9.6 x 6.6 x 1.4 in 1.5 lb

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Related Subjects

Business » Accounting and Finance
Business » Banking
Business » History and Biographies
Business » International
Business » Personal Finance
History and Social Science » Economics » General
History and Social Science » Economics » US Economy
History and Social Science » Politics » General

Debtors' Prison: The Politics of Austerity Versus Possibility Used Hardcover
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Product details 352 pages Knopf Publishing Group - English 9780307959805 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Kuttner (The Squandering of America), cofounder and co-editor of the American Prospect, pulls no punches in his latest full-throated defense of Keynesian economics and repudiation of the modern neoliberal system. Kuttner argues that rather than helping countries live within their means, austerity hampers economic growth and prevents recovery. Alternately rousing and oversaturated with statistics, the author nevertheless makes a convincing case that fiscal policy has been hijacked by the vested interests of international finance and the moneyed classes. Every economic crisis over the past several decades has sparked the same two-pronged response of prodigal bailouts of multinational investment banks and crippling strictures on the public sector. These strategies are enforced by elites with no democratic accountability and dangerously little local knowledge. For example, in their negotiations with Greece, the E.U. and the E.C.B. have demanded that the majority of Greek airports be abruptly sold off, a strategy that may raise several million dollars but would create massive social disturbances. When elected Greek officials agree to absurd conditions like these, they are of course voted out of office, while the jobs of the bureaucrats who came up with them remain secure. Kuttner's deft overview of economic history — most notably his coverage of the Marshall Plan — demonstrates that economic stimulus can be very effective at ending recessions. Agent: Amanda Urban, ICM." Publishers Weekly Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , A timely, broadly revisionist, essential book by one of our foremost economic observers takes down one of the most cherished tenets of contemporary financial thinking: that spending less, refusing to forgive debt, and shrinking government--"austerity"--is a solution to the current economic crisis.

Since the collapse of Lehman Brothers in September 2008, too much of our conversation about economic recovery has centered on the question of debt: whether we have too much of it, when to forgive it, and how to cut the deficit. Robert Kuttner makes the most powerful argument to date that these are the wrong questions and that austerity is the wrong solution. Blending economics with historical examples of effective debt relief and punitive debt enforcement, he makes clear that universal belt-tightening, as a prescription for recession, simply defies economic logic. Just as debtor's prisons once prevented individuals from working and thus being able to pay back their debts, austerity measures shackle, rather than restore, economic growth as the weight of past debt crushes the economy's future potential. Above all, Kuttner shows how austerity serves only the interest of creditors--the very bankers and financial elites whose actions precipitated the collapse. Lucid, authoritative, provocative--a book that is certain to be widely read and much debated.

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