Star Wars Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN!

Weekly drawing for $100 credit. Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

More at Powell's


Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | June 20, 2014

Lauren Owen: IMG The Other Vampire



It's a wild and thundery night. Inside a ramshackle old manor house, a beautiful young girl lies asleep in bed. At the window, a figure watches... Continue »
  1. $18.90 Sale Hardcover add to wish list

    The Quick

    Lauren Owen 9780812993271

spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$5.95
Used Hardcover
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Qty Store Section
1 Burnside Travel Writing- Africa and Middle East

Down the Nile: Alone in a Fisherman's Skiff

by

Down the Nile: Alone in a Fisherman's Skiff Cover

ISBN13: 9780316107457
ISBN10: 031610745x
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

Only 1 left in stock at $5.95!

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Mahoney was determined to take a solo trip down the Egyptian Nile, even though civil unrest and vexing local traditions conspired to create obstacles every step of the way. Despite the extreme conditions, her informed curiosity about the world, her glorious prose, and her wit never fail to captivate.

Review:

"This is travel writing at its most enjoyable: the reader is taken on a great trip with an erudite travel companion soaking up scads of history, culture and literary knowledge, along with the scenery. The genesis for the trip is simple: the author's love of rowing. Her plan, 'to buy a small Egyptian rowboat and row myself along the 120-mile stretch of river between the cities of Aswan and Qena,' is less so. Mahoney (The Singular Pilgrim; Whoredom in Kimmage) conveys readers along the longest river in the world, through narrative laced with insight, goodwill and sometimes sadness. Mahoney's writing style is conversational, her use of metaphor adept. She cleverly marshals the writings of numerous river travelers but focuses on 'two troubled geniuses': Florence Nightingale and Gustave Flaubert. The device allows readers a backward glance at the Edwardian travel accoutrements of sumptuous riverside dinners, staggering supplies of alcohol and food, trunks of books and commodious accommodations. The physical environment is demanding. 'When I removed my hat, the sun had made the top of my head sting... it was like having a freshly baked nail driven into one's skull.' Yet her biggest obstacle isn't the climate but the slippery hurdles of culture and sex. Whether struggling to buy a boat, visiting historic Luxor or rowing, innocent encounters become sticky psychological and philosophical snares. Still, the ride is smooth, leaving the reader wishing for more nautical miles. (July 11)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

Rosemary Mahoney was determined to take a solo trip down the Egyptian Nile in a small boat, even though civil unrest and vexing local traditions conspired to create obstacles every step of the way. Starting off in the south, she gained the unlikely sympathy and respect of a Muslim sailor, who provided her with both a seven-foot skiff and a window into the culturally and materially impoverished lives of rural Egyptians. Egyptian women don't row on the Nile, and tourists aren't allowed to for safety's sake. Mahoney endures extreme heat during the day, and a terror of crocodiles while alone in her boat at night. Whether she's confronting deeply held beliefs about non-Muslim women, finding connections to past chroniclers of the Nile, or coming to the dramaticm realization that fear can engender unwarranted violence, Rosemary Mahoney's informed curiosity about the world, her glorious prose, and her wit never fail to captivate.

What Our Readers Are Saying

Add a comment for a chance to win!
Average customer rating based on 1 comment:

monysmom, January 23, 2008 (view all comments by monysmom)
I am not a rowing enthusiast but I did like the idea of following ROsemary Mahoney, a single woman trying to make her way through Egypt to fulfill a goal of rowing down the Nile on her own, in a predominantly male dominated society. Being American, her brashness probably kept her going where a native-born woman would have given up but it is clear that she had a great adventure - kind of like a mini-Tahir Shah-type expedition, and she met some fascintating characters on the way. I liekd it so much I now have another book of hers, WHoredom in Kimmage on the way!
Was this comment helpful? | Yes | No
(5 of 8 readers found this comment helpful)

Product Details

ISBN:
9780316107457
Subtitle:
Alone in a Fisherman's Skiff
Author:
Mahoney, Rosemary
Author:
Mahoney, Rosemary
Publisher:
Little Brown and Company
Subject:
Middle East - Egypt
Subject:
Description and travel
Subject:
Egypt
Subject:
Special Interest - Adventure
Subject:
Egypt Description and travel.
Subject:
Nile River Description and travel.
Copyright:
Publication Date:
July 2007
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Pages:
273
Dimensions:
8.48x5.84x1.05 in. .93 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. The Flaneur: A Stroll Through the... Used Trade Paper $5.95
  2. Somebody's Heart Is Burning: A Woman... Used Trade Paper $5.95
  3. In Arabian Nights: A Caravan of... Used Hardcover $8.50
  4. The Windows of Brimnes: An American... Used Trade Paper $9.95
  5. Sahara Unveiled: A Journey Across... Used Hardcover $5.95
  6. Opium Season: A Year on the Afghan... Sale Hardcover $7.98

Related Subjects

Sports and Outdoors » Outdoors » Lore and Survival
Travel » Travel Writing » Africa and Middle East

Down the Nile: Alone in a Fisherman's Skiff Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.95 In Stock
Product details 273 pages Little Brown and Company - English 9780316107457 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "This is travel writing at its most enjoyable: the reader is taken on a great trip with an erudite travel companion soaking up scads of history, culture and literary knowledge, along with the scenery. The genesis for the trip is simple: the author's love of rowing. Her plan, 'to buy a small Egyptian rowboat and row myself along the 120-mile stretch of river between the cities of Aswan and Qena,' is less so. Mahoney (The Singular Pilgrim; Whoredom in Kimmage) conveys readers along the longest river in the world, through narrative laced with insight, goodwill and sometimes sadness. Mahoney's writing style is conversational, her use of metaphor adept. She cleverly marshals the writings of numerous river travelers but focuses on 'two troubled geniuses': Florence Nightingale and Gustave Flaubert. The device allows readers a backward glance at the Edwardian travel accoutrements of sumptuous riverside dinners, staggering supplies of alcohol and food, trunks of books and commodious accommodations. The physical environment is demanding. 'When I removed my hat, the sun had made the top of my head sting... it was like having a freshly baked nail driven into one's skull.' Yet her biggest obstacle isn't the climate but the slippery hurdles of culture and sex. Whether struggling to buy a boat, visiting historic Luxor or rowing, innocent encounters become sticky psychological and philosophical snares. Still, the ride is smooth, leaving the reader wishing for more nautical miles. (July 11)" Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , Rosemary Mahoney was determined to take a solo trip down the Egyptian Nile in a small boat, even though civil unrest and vexing local traditions conspired to create obstacles every step of the way. Starting off in the south, she gained the unlikely sympathy and respect of a Muslim sailor, who provided her with both a seven-foot skiff and a window into the culturally and materially impoverished lives of rural Egyptians. Egyptian women don't row on the Nile, and tourists aren't allowed to for safety's sake. Mahoney endures extreme heat during the day, and a terror of crocodiles while alone in her boat at night. Whether she's confronting deeply held beliefs about non-Muslim women, finding connections to past chroniclers of the Nile, or coming to the dramaticm realization that fear can engender unwarranted violence, Rosemary Mahoney's informed curiosity about the world, her glorious prose, and her wit never fail to captivate.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.