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Blood Money: Wasted Billions, Lost Lives, and Corporate Greed in Iraq

by

Blood Money: Wasted Billions, Lost Lives, and Corporate Greed in Iraq Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

It was supposed to be quick and easy. The Bush Administration even promised that it wouldn't cost American taxpayers a thing — Iraqi oil revenues would pay for it all. But billions and billions of dollars, and thousands of lives, later, the Iraqi reconstruction is an undeniable failure. Iraq pumps out less oil now than it did under Saddam. At best, Iraqis average all of twelve hours a day of electricity. American soldiers lack body armor and adequate protection for their motor vehicles.

Increasingly worse off, Iraqis turn against us. Increasingly worse off, our troops are killed by a strengthening insurgency.

As T. Christian Miller reveals in this searing and timely book, the Bush Administration has fatally undermined the war effort and our soldiers by handing out mountains of cash not to the best companies for the reconstruction effort, but to buddies, cronies, relatives and political hacks — some of whom have simply taken the money and run with it.

Blistering, brilliant and shocking, this will be the breakout title when it comes to Iraq books, and the catalyst for national debate.

Review:

"Miller's collection of riveting, disheartening narratives chronicle the spendthrift methods of the coalition behind the Iraq invasion, featuring so many spurious entrepreneurs, opportunistic politicians and greedy contractors that it almost requires a pen and paper to keep track of them all. Beginning with the war itself, Miller demonstrates how the high hopes and genuine passion of those in the front lines paved the way for corruption, fraud and criminal negligence. Miller cites countless improbable, self-serving schemes, including Alaska Senator Ted Stevens's plan to get Iraq's cellular phone network built by Eskimos; the high-end children's hospital proposed and built by Bush family friends at the expense of Iraq's already-existing and badly in-need health facilities; and the work of Halliburton, whose unprecedented involvement makes for disturbing revelations: 'From reveille to lights out, the American military depended on Halliburton for its existence.' Miller's telling examples, covering everything from water and electricity restoration to security, health care and oil production, are at once depressing and compelling, and one gets the sense that Miller could've gone on ad infinitum relating unfinished and tarnished projects. Though Miller jumps from one sector of Iraq's infrastructure to another and shows little concern for chronology, the coalition's effort itself is too disorganized and the avaricious characters too plentiful to permit Miller to concoct a more unified and linear narrative. Despite this, Miller's important account fascinates throughout with the breadth and depth of the ongoing debacle." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Review:

"When future historians sift through the wreckage of the Bush administration's Iraq policy, they will rely in large part on a handful of books by brilliant reporters who watched the debacle unfold. George Packer's 'The Assassins' Gate' is one such book, and Thomas E. Ricks' 'Fiasco' is certain to be another. To this short list of indispensable accounts detailing how what was supposed to be a liberation... Washington Post Book Review (read the entire Washington Post review)

Review:

"Readers interested in understanding the political and economic dynamics behind the faltering campaign in Iraq will appreciate this investigation." Booklist

Review:

"Another epitaph for Mr. Bush's War, and a book sure to fascinate — and anger — its readers." Kirkus Reviews

Review:

"[Miller's] compelling account...describes naiveté, incompetence, corruption and venality on a scale so colossal as to make it impossible to blame the results on any single figure....Above all, it raises questions about the seriousness of those who formulate U.S. policy." Los Angeles Times

Review:

"[T]he book gives the names of those who are guilty of immoral or illegal behavior, rarely uses anonymous sources, recognizes the efforts of those trying to help in Iraq while working honestly." Boston Globe

Synopsis:

It was supposed to be quick, easy, and cheap: the Bush administration promised American taxpayers that Iraqi oil revenues would pay for it all. But thousands of lives and billions of dollars later, the Iraqi reconstruction is an undeniable failure, overrun by staggering corruption, waste, and incompetence. In BLOOD MONEY, "top-flight

investigative reporter" (Mother Jones) T. Christian Miller reveals how the Bush administration failed to keep its promises and allowed a nation to tumble into chaos. Widely hailed as one of the most important books about the quagmire, BLOOD MONEY is essential reading for anyone who cares about the fate of Iraq, and about America's place in the world.

Synopsis:

An investigative reporter pens an explosive indictment of how the Bush Administration wasted billions in Iraq through sweetheart deals to G.O.P. supporters, outrageous contracts to corrupt companies, and absurdly naive assumptions.

About the Author

T. Christian Miller is an investigative reporter who writes for the Los Angeles Times' Washington bureau. In his ten years as a professional journalist, he has covered four wars and a presidential campaign, and has reported from more than two dozen countries; he was once kidnapped by leftist guerillas in Bogotá. Miller is a graduate of the University of California at Berkeley and lives in Washington, D.C. with his wife and two young children.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780316166270
Subtitle:
Wasted Billions, Lost Lives, and Corporate Greed in Iraq
Author:
Miller, T. Christian
Author:
Miller, T. Christian, MR
Publisher:
Back Bay Books
Subject:
United states
Subject:
Petroleum industry and trade
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
Political Freedom & Security - International Secur
Subject:
Government - U.S. Government
Subject:
Government
Copyright:
Publication Date:
20070502
Binding:
Hardcover
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
368
Dimensions:
8.25 x 5.5 x 1 in 0.73 lb

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Related Subjects

History and Social Science » Military » Iraq War (2003-)
History and Social Science » Politics » United States » Politics

Blood Money: Wasted Billions, Lost Lives, and Corporate Greed in Iraq Used Hardcover
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$6.95 In Stock
Product details 368 pages Little Brown and Company - English 9780316166270 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Miller's collection of riveting, disheartening narratives chronicle the spendthrift methods of the coalition behind the Iraq invasion, featuring so many spurious entrepreneurs, opportunistic politicians and greedy contractors that it almost requires a pen and paper to keep track of them all. Beginning with the war itself, Miller demonstrates how the high hopes and genuine passion of those in the front lines paved the way for corruption, fraud and criminal negligence. Miller cites countless improbable, self-serving schemes, including Alaska Senator Ted Stevens's plan to get Iraq's cellular phone network built by Eskimos; the high-end children's hospital proposed and built by Bush family friends at the expense of Iraq's already-existing and badly in-need health facilities; and the work of Halliburton, whose unprecedented involvement makes for disturbing revelations: 'From reveille to lights out, the American military depended on Halliburton for its existence.' Miller's telling examples, covering everything from water and electricity restoration to security, health care and oil production, are at once depressing and compelling, and one gets the sense that Miller could've gone on ad infinitum relating unfinished and tarnished projects. Though Miller jumps from one sector of Iraq's infrastructure to another and shows little concern for chronology, the coalition's effort itself is too disorganized and the avaricious characters too plentiful to permit Miller to concoct a more unified and linear narrative. Despite this, Miller's important account fascinates throughout with the breadth and depth of the ongoing debacle." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Review" by , "Readers interested in understanding the political and economic dynamics behind the faltering campaign in Iraq will appreciate this investigation."
"Review" by , "Another epitaph for Mr. Bush's War, and a book sure to fascinate — and anger — its readers."
"Review" by , "[Miller's] compelling account...describes naiveté, incompetence, corruption and venality on a scale so colossal as to make it impossible to blame the results on any single figure....Above all, it raises questions about the seriousness of those who formulate U.S. policy."
"Review" by , "[T]he book gives the names of those who are guilty of immoral or illegal behavior, rarely uses anonymous sources, recognizes the efforts of those trying to help in Iraq while working honestly."
"Synopsis" by , It was supposed to be quick, easy, and cheap: the Bush administration promised American taxpayers that Iraqi oil revenues would pay for it all. But thousands of lives and billions of dollars later, the Iraqi reconstruction is an undeniable failure, overrun by staggering corruption, waste, and incompetence. In BLOOD MONEY, "top-flight

investigative reporter" (Mother Jones) T. Christian Miller reveals how the Bush administration failed to keep its promises and allowed a nation to tumble into chaos. Widely hailed as one of the most important books about the quagmire, BLOOD MONEY is essential reading for anyone who cares about the fate of Iraq, and about America's place in the world.

"Synopsis" by , An investigative reporter pens an explosive indictment of how the Bush Administration wasted billions in Iraq through sweetheart deals to G.O.P. supporters, outrageous contracts to corrupt companies, and absurdly naive assumptions.
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