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The Poet of Tolstoy Park: A Novel

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Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

The more you transform your life from the material to the spiritual domain, the less you become afraid of death. Leo Tolstoy spoke these words, and they became Henry Stuart's raison d'etre. The Poet of Tolstoy Park is the unforgettable novel based on the true story of Henry Stuart's life, which was reclaimed from his doctor's belief that he would not live another year.

Henry responds to the news by slogging home barefoot in the rain. It's 1925. The place: Canyon County, Idaho. Henry is sixty-seven, a retired professor and a widower who has been told a warmer climate would make the end more tolerable. San Diego would be a good choice.

Instead, Henry chose Fairhope, Alabama, a town with utopian ideals and a haven for strong-minded individualists. Upton Sinclair, Sherwood Anderson, and Clarence Darrow were among its inhabitants. Henry bought his own ten acres of piney woods outside Fairhope. Before dying, underscored by the writings of his beloved Tolstoy, Henry could begin to perfect the soul awarded him and rest in the faith that he, and all people, would succeed, even if it took eons. Human existence, Henry believed, continues in a perfect circle unmarred by flaws of personality, irrespective of blood and possessions and rank, and separate from organized religion. In Alabama, until his final breath, he would chase these high ideas.

But first, Henry had to answer up for leaving Idaho. Henry's dearest friend and intellectual sparring partner, Pastor Will Webb, and Henry's two adult sons, Thomas and Harvey, were baffled and angry that he would abandon them and move to the Deep South, living in a barn there while he built a round house of handmade concrete blocks. His new neighbors were perplexed by his eccentric behavior as well. On the coldest day of winter he was barefoot, a philosopher and poet with ideas and words to share with anyone who would listen. And, mysteriously, his last few months became years. He had gone looking for a place to learn lessons in dying, and, studiously advanced to claim a vigorous new life.

The Poet of Tolstoy Park is a moving and irresistible story, a guidebook of the mind and spirit that lays hold of the heart. Henry Stuart points the way through life's puzzles for all of us, becoming in this timeless tale a character of such dimension that he seems more alive now than ever.

Review:

"A dying man's decision to move from Idaho to Alabama becomes a quixotic spiritual journey in Brewer's ruminative, idiosyncratic first novel, based on a true story. In 1925, widowed Henry Stuart learns that he has tuberculosis and will probably be dead within a year. Stuart's initial reaction is optimistic resignation, as he regards his illness as a final philosophical journey of reconciliation, one that sends him back through the writings of his beloved Tolstoy and other literary and spiritual figures to find solace and comfort. Despite the protests of his two sons and his best friend, he decides to move to the progressive town of Fairhope, Ala. There, he begins to build a round, domed cottage where he seeks to 'learn in solitude how to save myself' and earns himself the sobriquet 'the poet of Tolstoy Park.' The plot, such as it is, runs out of steam when Brewer makes an ill-advised decision to jump forward in time in the last chapters, but the heady blend of literary and philosophical references and some fine character writing make this a noteworthy debut. Agent, Amy Rennert. (Mar.) Forecast: Book world support for Brewer — who owns Over the Transom Bookshop in Fairhope, Ala., and is the editor of the annual anthology of Southern writing, Stories from the Blue Moon Caf — will be strong, as evidenced by blurbs from Pat Conroy, Robert Morgan, Rick Bragg and Winston Groom. Six-city author tour." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Synopsis:

In 1925, given only a year to live by his doctor, Henry Stuart leaves his home and grown sons in Idaho to move to the woods on the eastern shore of Mobile Bay, Alabama, where he builds a round house and lives for more than two decades, while visitors make a pilgrimage to visit him on the property he names after Leo Tolstoy. 50,000 first printing.

Synopsis:

<P>&ldquo;The more you transform your life from the material to the spiritual domain, the less you become afraid of death.&rdquo; Leo Tolstoy spoke these words, and they became Henry Stuart&rsquo;s raison d&rsquo;etre. <i>The Poet of Tolstoy Park</i> is the unforgettable novel based on the true story of Henry Stuart&rsquo;s life, which was reclaimed from his doctor&rsquo;s belief that he would not live another year.</P><P>Henry responds to the news by slogging home barefoot in the rain. It&rsquo;s 1925. The place: Canyon County, Idaho. Henry is sixty&ndash;seven, a retired professor and a widower who has been told a warmer climate would make the end more tolerable. San Diego would be a good choice. </P><P>Instead, Henry chose Fairhope, Alabama, a town with utopian ideals and a haven for strong&ndash;minded individualists. Upton Sinclair, Sherwood Anderson, and Clarence Darrow were among its inhabitants. Henry bought his own ten acres of piney woods outside Fairhope. Before dying, underscored by the writings of his beloved Tolstoy, Henry could begin to &ldquo;perfect the soul awarded him&rdquo; and rest in the faith that he, and all people, would succeed, &ldquo;even if it took eons.&rdquo; Human existence, Henry believed, continues in a perfect circle unmarred by flaws of personality, irrespective of blood and possessions and rank, and separate from organized religion. In Alabama, until his final breath, he would chase these high ideas.</P><P>But first, Henry had to answer up for leaving Idaho. Henry&rsquo;s dearest friend and intellectual sparring partner, Pastor Will Webb, and Henry&rsquo;s two adult sons, Thomas and Harvey, were baffled and angry that he would abandon them and move to the Deep South, living in a barn there while he built a round house of handmade concrete blocks. His new neighbors were perplexed by his eccentric behavior as well. On t

About the Author

SONNY BREWER owns Over the Transom Bookshop in Fairhope and is board chairman of the nonprofit Fairhope Center for the Writing Arts. He is the former editor in chief of Mobile Bay Monthly; he also published and edited Eastern Shore Quarterly magazine, edited Red Bluff Review, and was founding associate editor of the weekly West Alabama Gazette. Brewer is the editor of the acclaimed annual three-volume anthology of Southern writing, Stories from the Blue Moon Cafe.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780345481962
Subtitle:
A Novel
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Author:
Brewer, Sonny
Author:
Sonny Brewer
Subject:
Fiction-General
Subject:
Fiction : General
Subject:
General
Subject:
Solitude
Subject:
Terminally ill
Subject:
Biographical fiction
Subject:
Older people
Subject:
General Fiction
Subject:
Audio Books-Literature
Subject:
Literature-A to Z
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20050301
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
254

Related Subjects

Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Poet of Tolstoy Park: A Novel
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 254 pages Random House Publishing Group - English 9780345481962 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A dying man's decision to move from Idaho to Alabama becomes a quixotic spiritual journey in Brewer's ruminative, idiosyncratic first novel, based on a true story. In 1925, widowed Henry Stuart learns that he has tuberculosis and will probably be dead within a year. Stuart's initial reaction is optimistic resignation, as he regards his illness as a final philosophical journey of reconciliation, one that sends him back through the writings of his beloved Tolstoy and other literary and spiritual figures to find solace and comfort. Despite the protests of his two sons and his best friend, he decides to move to the progressive town of Fairhope, Ala. There, he begins to build a round, domed cottage where he seeks to 'learn in solitude how to save myself' and earns himself the sobriquet 'the poet of Tolstoy Park.' The plot, such as it is, runs out of steam when Brewer makes an ill-advised decision to jump forward in time in the last chapters, but the heady blend of literary and philosophical references and some fine character writing make this a noteworthy debut. Agent, Amy Rennert. (Mar.) Forecast: Book world support for Brewer — who owns Over the Transom Bookshop in Fairhope, Ala., and is the editor of the annual anthology of Southern writing, Stories from the Blue Moon Caf — will be strong, as evidenced by blurbs from Pat Conroy, Robert Morgan, Rick Bragg and Winston Groom. Six-city author tour." Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
"Synopsis" by , In 1925, given only a year to live by his doctor, Henry Stuart leaves his home and grown sons in Idaho to move to the woods on the eastern shore of Mobile Bay, Alabama, where he builds a round house and lives for more than two decades, while visitors make a pilgrimage to visit him on the property he names after Leo Tolstoy. 50,000 first printing.
"Synopsis" by , <P>&ldquo;The more you transform your life from the material to the spiritual domain, the less you become afraid of death.&rdquo; Leo Tolstoy spoke these words, and they became Henry Stuart&rsquo;s raison d&rsquo;etre. <i>The Poet of Tolstoy Park</i> is the unforgettable novel based on the true story of Henry Stuart&rsquo;s life, which was reclaimed from his doctor&rsquo;s belief that he would not live another year.</P><P>Henry responds to the news by slogging home barefoot in the rain. It&rsquo;s 1925. The place: Canyon County, Idaho. Henry is sixty&ndash;seven, a retired professor and a widower who has been told a warmer climate would make the end more tolerable. San Diego would be a good choice. </P><P>Instead, Henry chose Fairhope, Alabama, a town with utopian ideals and a haven for strong&ndash;minded individualists. Upton Sinclair, Sherwood Anderson, and Clarence Darrow were among its inhabitants. Henry bought his own ten acres of piney woods outside Fairhope. Before dying, underscored by the writings of his beloved Tolstoy, Henry could begin to &ldquo;perfect the soul awarded him&rdquo; and rest in the faith that he, and all people, would succeed, &ldquo;even if it took eons.&rdquo; Human existence, Henry believed, continues in a perfect circle unmarred by flaws of personality, irrespective of blood and possessions and rank, and separate from organized religion. In Alabama, until his final breath, he would chase these high ideas.</P><P>But first, Henry had to answer up for leaving Idaho. Henry&rsquo;s dearest friend and intellectual sparring partner, Pastor Will Webb, and Henry&rsquo;s two adult sons, Thomas and Harvey, were baffled and angry that he would abandon them and move to the Deep South, living in a barn there while he built a round house of handmade concrete blocks. His new neighbors were perplexed by his eccentric behavior as well. On t
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