Signed Edition Sweepstakes
 
 

Recently Viewed clear list


Original Essays | September 30, 2014

Benjamin Parzybok: IMG A Brief History of Video Games Played by Mayors, Presidents, and Emperors



Brandon Bartlett, the fictional mayor of Portland in my novel Sherwood Nation, is addicted to playing video games. In a city he's all but lost... Continue »
  1. $11.20 Sale Trade Paper add to wish list

    Sherwood Nation

    Benjamin Parzybok 9781618730862

spacer

This item may be
out of stock.

Click on the button below to search for this title in other formats.


Check for Availability
Add to Wishlist

The Diagnosis

by

The Diagnosis Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

THE DIAGNOSIS

ON THE SUBWAY

People must have been in a great hurry, for no one noticed anything wrong with Bill Chalmers as he dashed from his automobile one fine summer morning. Earnest and dressed in a blue cotton suit, he was immediately swept up by the mass of commuters also galloping from their cars toward the elevators and down to the trains of the Alewife Station, a cavernous structure of concrete and crisscrossed steel struts, one end of the Red Line through Boston. At the ground floor, Chalmers presented his pass and rushed through the turnstile. He was halfway down the stairs to the platform when he heard the taut string of electronic beeps and the doors began sliding on train Number One. A woman groaned. Another commuter, a tall nervous man with squeaky shoes, lunged ahead and ran alongside the train, shouting and slapping his magazine against the red paneled doors. But the train was already in motion, its steel wheels scraping and squealing so fiercely that several people had to turn up their head sets. The tall man swiveled and shot Chalmers an accusing stare, as if his lack of sufficient speed through the turnstile had caused a half-dozen people to miss their trains. What a jerk, Chalmers thought to himself and looked down at his watch. It was 8:22. Twenty-three minutes to his stop, a nine-minute walk to his building, two minutes on the elevator, and he'd be sitting at his desk by 9:00. Assuming the train on Track Two arrived and departed within four minutes, as it should. With some satisfaction he reminded himself that, unlike the ridiculously agitated man with the magazine, he had calculated his morning commute so that he could miss the first train and still arrive at the office on time. Abruptly, he began worrying that the train on Track Two might be late. Never had that happened when he'd missed train Number One, but it was certainly a possibility. Stroking his mustache, he continued down the stairs and looked again at his watch. He mustn't waste the four minutes. However, he slowed his descent to drop fifty cents into the cup of a homeless woman sprawled on the edge of the stairs. She looked disturbingly like his old piano teacher. "Thank you, kind sir," she said. "Please don't thank me," he answered, embarrassed. "I thank everyone who is more fortunate than me," she called to him as he hurried down to the platform. Waves of people flowed around him, jostling and crushing from all sides, shoving each other to gain an advantage for the next arriving train. Gulped down in seconds were muffins and rolls, hard-boiled eggs, bananas, coffee, and crackers. Some commuters tried to unfold newspapers in the cramped space but gave up and contented themselves with staring at the digital sign on the kiosk, where bits of news and the correct time scrolled by in bright glowing dots. The dozens of upturned faces were waxy and yellow beneath the underground fluorescent bulbs.

Even in that pale yellow light, if any of those waiting had looked carefully into Chalmers's eyes, they might have observed a faint petrifaction, a solidification, some sign that all was not well. But they did not, occupied with their own busy schedules and the marching dots on the sign. Chalmers himself felt perfectly fit, aside from the normal stresses and aches of a man just past forty, arguably overweight but by no means fat. He glanced at his watch, 8:23, and forged a path to

Synopsis:

Businessman Bill Chalmers descends into a nightmare as he pursues a diagnosis for the strange illness--involving a bizarre memory loss and a strange numbness that gradually affects his entire body--that has affected him. By the author of Einstein's Dreams. 50,000 first printing.

Synopsis:

From the bestselling author of Einstein's Dreams comes this harrowing tale of one man's struggle to cope in a wired world, even as his own biological wiring short-circuits. AsBoston's Red Line shuttles Bill Chalmers to work one summer morning, something extraordinary happens. Suddenly, he can't remember which stop is his, where he works, or even who he is. The only thing he canremember is his corporate motto: the maximum information in the minimum time.

Bill's memory returns, but a strange numbness afflicts him. As he attempts to find a diagnosis for hisdeteriorating illness, he descends into a nightmarish tangle of inconclusive results, his company's manic frenzy, and his family's disbelief. Ultimately, Bill discovers that he is fighting not just forhis body but also for his soul.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

About the Author

Alan Lightman lives in Boston.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375421198
Publisher:
Pantheon Books
Subject:
Executives
Author:
Lightman, Alan
Author:
Lightman, Alan P.
Subject:
Psychological
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Psychological
Subject:
Fiction-Literary
Subject:
Fiction-Psychological
Subject:
Fiction : Psychological
Subject:
Fiction : Literary
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
2000
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
369

Related Subjects

» Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

The Diagnosis
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 369 pages Pantheon - English 9780375421198 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , Businessman Bill Chalmers descends into a nightmare as he pursues a diagnosis for the strange illness--involving a bizarre memory loss and a strange numbness that gradually affects his entire body--that has affected him. By the author of Einstein's Dreams. 50,000 first printing.
"Synopsis" by , From the bestselling author of Einstein's Dreams comes this harrowing tale of one man's struggle to cope in a wired world, even as his own biological wiring short-circuits. AsBoston's Red Line shuttles Bill Chalmers to work one summer morning, something extraordinary happens. Suddenly, he can't remember which stop is his, where he works, or even who he is. The only thing he canremember is his corporate motto: the maximum information in the minimum time.

Bill's memory returns, but a strange numbness afflicts him. As he attempts to find a diagnosis for hisdeteriorating illness, he descends into a nightmarish tangle of inconclusive results, his company's manic frenzy, and his family's disbelief. Ultimately, Bill discovers that he is fighting not just forhis body but also for his soul.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

spacer
spacer
  • back to top
Follow us on...




Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.