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1 Burnside Children's Picture Books- A to Z

Where Did Daddy's Hair Go?

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Where Did Daddy's Hair Go? Cover

ISBN13: 9780375835711
ISBN10: 0375835717
Condition: Standard
Dustjacket: Standard
All Product Details

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educationofahana, July 9, 2010 (view all comments by educationofahana)
For a world which was born almost bald, we place a lot of importance in having hair. Jeremiah Jensen, a little boy who had never thought much about hair before his dad gets called “Baldy” at a baseball game, suddenly realizes that he, too, could be without hair one day. Overhearing only part of a conversation on the phone where his dad says, “Ever since I lost my hair…”, Jeremiah takes it upon himself to locate daddy’s missing hair. He searches for it in the house, in closets, cupboards and drawers, in the bathtub, the garage and even looks for it in the toilet. He searches in trash cans, under rocks and in the yard and still finds no hair.

All of a sudden his eyes open up to all the things around him which look like his dad’s head - a pencil eraser, a hill with no grass on top, a camel’s hump, a turtle and a pig but concludes that “none of these things really lost their hair… some of them didn’t even have hair to begin with.” When his baby sister, Rosalie’s bald head gives him the idea that his dad might have been “just born like that”, he looks for confirmation, only to find out that he too once was bald as a baby and that his dad once had hair, which fell out little by little as he grew older.

Jeremiah pictures his dad with different kinds of hair and asks him questions like, “Did it hurt when your hair came out?”, “Did it bleed?”, “Did you cry?”. When he goes to the beach next day, he observes the different kinds of bodies around him, their shapes, sizes, colors, hair and hairlessness. He even picks out the different kinds of bald heads. “Some looked like doughnuts, others like horseshoes. Some were completely bald like the man in the moon.” And he concludes that he has no need to find his daddy’s hair and he thinks his father is perfect just the way he is.

Written by Joe O’Connor, who claims to be “unabashedly, magnificently bald”, this book’s comic artwork, by Henry Payne (“still in full possession of his hair”) is a pleasure to look at. Coming to terms with the fact that everyone looks different, Jeremiah teaches all of us older people a lesson in humility. I like it.
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educationofahana, July 9, 2010 (view all comments by educationofahana)
For a world which was born almost bald, we place a lot of importance in having hair. Jeremiah Jensen, a little boy who had never thought much about hair before his dad gets called “Baldy” at a baseball game, suddenly realizes that he, too, could be without hair one day. Overhearing only part of a conversation on the phone where his dad says, “Ever since I lost my hair…”, Jeremiah takes it upon himself to locate daddy’s missing hair. He searches for it in the house, in closets, cupboards and drawers, in the bathtub, the garage and even looks for it in the toilet. He searches in trash cans, under rocks and in the yard and still finds no hair.

All of a sudden his eyes open up to all the things around him which look like his dad’s head - a pencil eraser, a hill with no grass on top, a camel’s hump, a turtle and a pig but concludes that “none of these things really lost their hair… some of them didn’t even have hair to begin with.” When his baby sister, Rosalie’s bald head gives him the idea that his dad might have been “just born like that”, he looks for confirmation, only to find out that he too once was bald as a baby and that his dad once had hair, which fell out little by little as he grew older.

Jeremiah pictures his dad with different kinds of hair and asks him questions like, “Did it hurt when your hair came out?”, “Did it bleed?”, “Did you cry?”. When he goes to the beach next day, he observes the different kinds of bodies around him, their shapes, sizes, colors, hair and hairlessness. He even picks out the different kinds of bald heads. “Some looked like doughnuts, others like horseshoes. Some were completely bald like the man in the moon.” And he concludes that he has no need to find his daddy’s hair and he thinks his father is perfect just the way he is.

Written by Joe O’Connor, who claims to be “unabashedly, magnificently bald”, this book’s comic artwork, by Henry Payne (“still in full possession of his hair”) is a pleasure to look at. Coming to terms with the fact that everyone looks different, Jeremiah teaches all of us older people a lesson in humility. I like it.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780375835711
Author:
Payne, Henry
Publisher:
Random House Books for Young Readers
Illustrator:
Payne, Henry
Author:
O'Connor, Joe
Author:
illustrated by Henry Payne
Author:
Payne, Henry
Subject:
Children's 4-8 - Picturebooks
Subject:
Children's 4-8 - Fiction - General
Subject:
Humorous Stories
Subject:
Family - Parents
Subject:
Hair
Subject:
Baldness
Subject:
Social Issues - General
Copyright:
Series:
Picture Book
Publication Date:
20060425
Binding:
Hardback
Grade Level:
Children/juvenile
Language:
English
Illustrations:
FULL COLOR
Pages:
40
Dimensions:
7.84x9.66x.46 in. .74 lbs.
Children's Book Type:
Picture / Wordless
Age Level:
05-08

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Related Subjects

Children's » Holidays » Fathers Day
Children's » Picture Books » A to Z

Where Did Daddy's Hair Go? Used Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$5.95 In Stock
Product details 40 pages Random House Books for Young Readers - English 9780375835711 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "A boy learns to see his father through new eyes in this humorous though occasionally disjointed tale. A stranger's passing jibe at a baseball game ('Hey, Baldy — sit down!') alerts Jeremiah to his father's baldness, something he'd never considered before. He later overhears his parent say, 'I lost my hair,' and decides to help. Jeremiah searches high and low ('He even looked in the toilet bowl') for Daddy's hair. The boy then goes on to muse on the nature of baldness, 'I wonder if other things lose their hair like Daddy did,' then has an epiphany when he spies his baby sister: 'Maybe he was just born like that!' Editorial cartoonist Payne uses bold ink outlines for his characters and objects, while warm earthy hues offset stark white backgrounds, and funny images abound. For example, when Jeremiah imagines Daddy with hair, a spread depicts six versions of the man with wavy, curly or slicked-back locks, and as a cowboy, rock star and nerd. While the story meanders some, the tale's thoughtful and comical aspects, which emphasize Daddy's self-acceptance and prompt Jeremiah's awareness of the beauty of human diversity, ultimately redeem it. Ages 5-8. (Apr.)" Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)
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