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Five Children and It

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Five Children and It Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

* CHAPTER 1 *

Beautiful as the Day

The house was three miles from the station, but before the dusty hired fly had rattled along for five minutes the children began to put their heads out of the carriage window and to say, Aren't we nearly there? And every time they passed a house, which was not very often, they all said, Oh, is this it? But it never was, till they reached the very top of the hill, just past the chalk quarry and before you come to the gravel pit. And then there was a white house with a green garden and an orchard beyond, and Mother said, Here we are

How white the house is, said Robert.

And look at the roses, said Anthea.

And the plums, said Jane.

It is rather decent, Cyril admitted.

The Baby said, Wanty go walky; and the fly stopped with a last rattle and jolt.

Everyone got its legs kicked or its feet trodden on in the scramble to get out of the carriage that very minute, but no one seemed to mind. Mother, curiously enough, was in no hurry to get out; and even when she had come down slowly and by the step, and with no jump at all, she seemed to wish to see the boxes carried in, and even to pay the driver, instead of joining in that first glorious rush round the garden and the orchard and the thorny, thistly, briery, brambly wilderness beyond the broken gate and the dry fountain at the side of the house. But the children were wiser, for once. It was not really a pretty house at all; it was quite ordinary, and Mother thought it was rather inconvenient, and was quite annoyed at there being no shelves, to speak of, and hardly a cupboard in the place. Father used to say that the ironwork on the roof and coping was like an architect's nightmare. But the house was deep in the country, with no other house in sight, and the children had been in London for two years, without so much as once going to the seaside even for a day by an excursion train, and so the White House seemed to them a sort of fairy palace set down in an earthly paradise. For London is like prison for children, especially if their relations are not rich.

Of course there are the shops and the theatres, and Maskelyne and Cook's, and things, but if your people are rather poor you don't get taken to the theatres, and you can't buy things out of the shops; and London has none of those nice things that children may play with without hurting the things or themselves--such as trees and sand and woods and waters. And nearly everything in London is the wrong sort of shape--all straight lines and flat streets, instead of being all sorts of odd shapes, as things are in the country. Trees are all different, as you know, and I am sure some tiresome person must have told you that there are no two blades of grass exactly alike. But in streets where the blades of grass don't grow, everything is like everything else. This is why so many children who live in towns are so extremely naughty. They do not know what is the matter with them, and no more do their fathers and mothers, aunts, uncles, cousins, tutors, governesses, and nurses; but I know. And so do you now. Children in the country are naughty sometimes, too, but that is for quite different reasons.

The children had explored the gardens and the outhouses thoroughly before they were caught and cleaned for tea, and they saw quite well that they were certain to be happy at the White House. They thought so from

Synopsis:

When four brothers and sisters discover a Psammead, or sand-fairy, in the gravel pit near the country house where they are staying, they have no way of knowing all the adventures its wish-granting will bring them.

Synopsis:

In the hands of an elf high-mage, the fabled mythals are Faerun's most potent sources of magical power. But in the hands of a demon princess from a forgotten epoch, they're the most powerful weapons imaginable.

From the Paperback edition.

About the Author

E. Nesbit (1858–1924) is the beloved author of nearly 40 books, including Five Children and It, The Phoenix and the Carpet, and The Story of the Amulet.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780375895241
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Subject:
Brothers and sisters
Introduction:
Snyder, Laurel
Illustrator:
Millar, H. R.
Illustrator:
H. R. Millar
Calligrapher:
Millar, H. R.
Author:
E., Nesbit
Author:
Snyder, Laurel
Author:
introduction by Laurel Snyder
Author:
H. R. Millar
Author:
illustrated by H. R. Millar
Author:
Nesbit, E.
Author:
Millar, H. R.
Subject:
Fairies
Subject:
Fiction : Fantasy - General
Subject:
Juvenile Fiction : Classics
Subject:
Juvenile Fiction : Fantasy & Magic
Subject:
Juvenile Fiction : Family - Siblings
Subject:
Classics
Subject:
Fantasy & Magic
Subject:
Family - Siblings
Subject:
Childrens classics
Subject:
Children s Middle Readers-General
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20100126
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Grade Level:
3-7
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
272
Age Level:
8-12

Related Subjects

Children's » Classics » General
Children's » Historical Fiction » Europe
Children's » Reference » Family and Genealogy
Children's » Science Fiction and Fantasy » General

Five Children and It
0 stars - 0 reviews
$ In Stock
Product details 272 pages Random House Children's Books - English 9780375895241 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , When four brothers and sisters discover a Psammead, or sand-fairy, in the gravel pit near the country house where they are staying, they have no way of knowing all the adventures its wish-granting will bring them.
"Synopsis" by , In the hands of an elf high-mage, the fabled mythals are Faerun's most potent sources of magical power. But in the hands of a demon princess from a forgotten epoch, they're the most powerful weapons imaginable.

From the Paperback edition.

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