This is Real Life Sale
 
 

Special Offers see all

Enter to WIN a $100 Credit

Subscribe to PowellsBooks.news
for a chance to win.
Privacy Policy

Visit our stores


    Recently Viewed clear list


    Original Essays | February 16, 2015

    Mary Pilon: IMG The Coffee Shops I Have Loved



    "Should I kill myself, or have a cup of coffee?" – Albert Camus In the five years it took for me to complete my book, The Monopolists, I wrote... Continue »

    spacer
Qualifying orders ship free.
$16.00
New Trade Paper
Ships in 1 to 3 days
Add to Wishlist
Available for In-store Pickup
in 7 to 12 days
Qty Store Section
4 Remote Warehouse Biography- Women
11 Remote Warehouse Biography- General

This title in other editions

Ester and Ruzya

by

Ester and Ruzya Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

1. What does Masha's prologue indicate about the concept of home and homecomings? What does she tell us about the ways in which politics, journalism, and family storytelling traditions affected her approach in writing this memoir?

2. Did Ester's close community in Bialystok endow her with survival skills? How was her thinking influenced by her parents' differing opinions about Zionism? How were they able to convey Judaism as the heart of her identity while also professing atheism?

3. What elements of Ruzya's personality persist from girlhood through the rest of her life? Does she become as fearful as her father? What keeps her a skeptic, rather than becoming a fervent loyalist like Samuil?

4. How would you characterize Ester's experience with Russia's university system as she arrives in Moscow during the Great Terror? How did you react to the means by which she was tested? Is higher education in contemporary America free from discrimination? What are appropriate means for measuring scholastic aptitude?

5. Is Ester's personality fundamentally similar to Ruzya's? Would you have expected them to be incompatible had they not shared similar life experiences? Describe your most lasting friendships. How did they begin? Is it possible to know what really sustains them?

6. To what do you attribute the survival of Ester and Ruzya, as well as Bella, in the face of so many mass executions? Is survival a matter of luck, ingenuity, divine intervention, or other factors? Beyond surviving physically, what allowed these three women to keep a glimmer of their true selves alive as well?

7. Discuss the ways in which Ester and Ruzya experienced love and marriage. Their first loves, Isaj and Samuil, were both lost in the violence of war. Ester's eventual marriage to Boris was a matter of pure survival. Anti-Semitism cut short other relationships. Yet neither woman became bitter about the possibility of romantic love. What accounts for this? What do their stories indicate about the realities of love?

8. In Part Four, dedicated to Jakubs story, Masha reconstructs the conflicting accounts of her grandfathers final days. How were you affected by the absence of certainty about these circumstances? How does the grieving process change when survivors are deprived of such certainty and detail? Would you have participated in an uprising had you lived in Bialystok alongside Jakub?

9. How did Chaika Grossman's fate influence Esters opinion of the world, especially regarding the possibility of Israel? What does Ester's daring telegram say about the power of language?

10. Near the end of chapter fourteen, Masha quotes ghetto survivors who expressed the possibility "that the Nazis hoped intolerable living conditions . . . would make the Jews 'degenerate to the level of criminals.' " What determines how populations will react in such circumstances? What power did the Nazi's prisoners still possess while essentially trying to negotiate for their lives?

11. Discuss the theme of translation that recurs throughout the book. How are language and identity linked? What talents are required to be a proficient translator? What would it take to master the language of censorship?

12. How did Ester and Ruzya  differ in the ways they balanced the demands of  conscience versus necessity? What were the costs and benefits of the many compromises they made?

13. What are the modern-day equivalents of the Soviet 'anti-cosmopolitan" campaigns? How did the death of Stalin affect Ester's and Ruzya's sense of security?

14. What new facts did you discover about Hitler's war and Stalin's peace while reading this memoir? What aspects seem underreported in popular histories of the twentieth century?

15. Though this is primarily the story of Masha's grandmothers, the author's experience is an essential component of the memoir. How are their lives reflected in hers? How does her sense of identity evolve between the prologue and the closing paragraphs? How does her work as a journalist compare to that of the many foreign correspondents who tried to report on the same events covered in Ester and Ruzya?

16. What future do you predict for Masha's children? What sort of memoir might her grandchildren write about her? What world events would your grandchildren discuss in a memoir about you?

Synopsis:

In this absorbing portrait, Gessen relates the experiences of her two grandmothers, both Russian Jews who survived the atrocities inflicted by Hitler and Stalin during World War II, showing how overwhelming events force people to search for the decent compromise.

Synopsis:

To fourteen-year-old Masha Gessen, Ester the rebel and Ruzya the censor were not hostages to history but simply her beloved grandmothers. And when she and her parents emigrated to the United States in 1981, once the Soviet Union began allowing its Jewish citizens to leave, she feared she would never see these women again. Ten years later, however, she was able to return to Moscow, this time as a young journalist on assignment, and Ester and Ruzya were there to meet her at the airport. Over the course of the years that followed, she drew them out about their lives, learning what it meant to have struggled through the cataclysmic upheavals of the war, the Holocaust, and Stalin's terror. Both women lost the men they loved during the war, both were jews under an oppressive and increasingly anti-Semitic regime, and both had careers that made use of their gifts for foreign languages. But these two close friends make very different choices in response to the intolerable demands of their time. A moving portrayal of how overwhelming events force people to search for the decent compromise, the right choice when there is no choice at all, this narrative casts a warm human light on a dark and troubled time in history.

About the Author

Masha Gessen was born in the U.S.S.R., emigrated to the United States when she was fourteen years old, and later returned to Russia as a foreign correspondent. She makes her permanent home in Moscow with her partner, Svenya, and their two children but is currently living in Boston, where she has a Neiman Fellowship at Harvard.

From the Hardcover edition.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385336055
Author:
Gessen, Masha
Publisher:
Dial Press
Subject:
Women
Subject:
Jews
Subject:
Grandmothers
Subject:
Jewish - General
Subject:
Ethnic Cultures - General
Subject:
Soviet Union Social conditions.
Subject:
General Biography
Subject:
Biography-Ethnic Cultures
Subject:
Biography-Women
Subject:
russia;memoir;wwii;holocaust;jews;stalin;poland;history
Edition Description:
Trade paper
Publication Date:
20051031
Binding:
TRADE PAPER
Grade Level:
General/trade
Language:
English
Illustrations:
Y
Pages:
384
Dimensions:
8.34x5.30x.75 in. .88 lbs.

Other books you might like

  1. The Jewish Enlightenment (Jewish... New Trade Paper $30.75
  2. Act One an Autobiography Used Hardcover $9.50
  3. Luncheonette: A Memoir Used Hardcover $3.95
  4. Elements of Style: A Novel Used Hardcover $3.95
  5. Winter Brothers: A Season at the... Used Trade Paper $6.95
  6. The Guns of August
    Used Mass Market $5.50

Related Subjects


Biography » General
Biography » Women
History and Social Science » Russia » General Russian History
History and Social Science » World History » Holocaust
Religion » Judaism » History
Religion » Judaism » Holocaust
Religion » Judaism » Jewish History

Ester and Ruzya New Trade Paper
0 stars - 0 reviews
$16.00 In Stock
Product details 384 pages Dial Press - English 9780385336055 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , In this absorbing portrait, Gessen relates the experiences of her two grandmothers, both Russian Jews who survived the atrocities inflicted by Hitler and Stalin during World War II, showing how overwhelming events force people to search for the decent compromise.
"Synopsis" by , To fourteen-year-old Masha Gessen, Ester the rebel and Ruzya the censor were not hostages to history but simply her beloved grandmothers. And when she and her parents emigrated to the United States in 1981, once the Soviet Union began allowing its Jewish citizens to leave, she feared she would never see these women again. Ten years later, however, she was able to return to Moscow, this time as a young journalist on assignment, and Ester and Ruzya were there to meet her at the airport. Over the course of the years that followed, she drew them out about their lives, learning what it meant to have struggled through the cataclysmic upheavals of the war, the Holocaust, and Stalin's terror. Both women lost the men they loved during the war, both were jews under an oppressive and increasingly anti-Semitic regime, and both had careers that made use of their gifts for foreign languages. But these two close friends make very different choices in response to the intolerable demands of their time. A moving portrayal of how overwhelming events force people to search for the decent compromise, the right choice when there is no choice at all, this narrative casts a warm human light on a dark and troubled time in history.
spacer
spacer
  • back to top

FOLLOW US ON...

     
Powell's City of Books is an independent bookstore in Portland, Oregon, that fills a whole city block with more than a million new, used, and out of print books. Shop those shelves — plus literally millions more books, DVDs, and gifts — here at Powells.com.