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Day of Empire: How Hyperpowers Rise to Global dominance--and Why They Fall

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Day of Empire: How Hyperpowers Rise to Global dominance--and Why They Fall Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

In a little over two centuries, America has grown from a regional power to a superpower, and to what is today called a hyperpower. But can America retain its position as the world’s dominant power, or has it already begun to decline?

Historians have debated the rise and fall of empires for centuries. To date, however, no one has studied the far rarer phenomenon of hyperpowers—those few societies that amassed such extraordinary military and economic might that they essentially dominated the world.

Now, in this sweeping history of globally dominant empires, bestselling author Amy Chua explains how hyperpowers rise and why they fall. In a series of brilliantly focused chapters, Chua examines history’s hyperpowers—Persia, Rome, Tang China, the Mongols, the Dutch, the British, and the United States—and reveals the reasons behind their success, as well as the roots of their ultimate demise.

Chua’s unprecedented study reveals a fascinating historical pattern. For all their differences, she argues, every one of these world-dominant powers was, at least by the standards of its time, extraordinarily pluralistic and tolerant. Each one succeeded by harnessing the skills and energies of individuals from very different backgrounds, and by attracting and exploiting highly talented groups that were excluded in other societies. Thus Rome allowed Africans, Spaniards, and Gauls alike to rise to the highest echelons of power, while the “barbarian” Mongols conquered their vast domains only because they practiced an ethnic and religious tolerance unheard of in their time. In contrast,

Nazi Germany and imperial Japan, while wielding great power, failed to attain global dominance as a direct result of their racial and religious intolerance.

But Chua also uncovers a great historical irony: in virtually every instance, multicultural tolerance eventually sowed the seeds of decline, and diversity became a liability, triggering conflict, hatred, and violence.

The United States is the quintessential example of a power that rose to global dominance through tolerance and diversity. The secret to America’s success has always been its unsurpassed ability to attract enterprising immigrants. Today, however, concerns about outsourcing and uncontrolled illegal immigration are producing a backlash against our tradition of cultural openness. Has America finally reached a “tipping point”? Have we gone too far in the direction of diversity and tolerance to maintain cohesion and unity? Will we be overtaken by rising powers like China, the EU or even India?

Chua shows why American power may have already exceeded its limits and why it may be in our interest to retreat from our go-it-alone approach and promote a new multilateralism in both domestic and foreign affairs.

Synopsis:

A study of history's great hyperpowers--Persia, Rome, China, the Mongols, the Dutch, the British, and the United States--traces the reasons for their success and the roots of their ultimate fall, examining why multiculturalism and diversity became a liability as they triggered hatred, intolerance, conflict, and violence as she looks at the state of the American empire. 60,000 first printing.

About the Author

AMY CHUA is the John Duff Jr. Professor of Law at Yale Law School. She is the author of World on Fire and is a noted expert in the fields of international business transactions, law and development, and globalization and the law. She lives in New Haven, Connecticut.

Table of Contents

The first hegemon : the great Persian empire from Cyrus to Alexander — Tolerance in Rome's high empire : gladiators, togas, and imperial glue — China's golden age : the mix-blooded Tang dynasty — The great Mongol empire : cosmopolitan barbarians — The "purification" of medieval Spain : inquisition, expulsion, and the price of intolerance — The Dutch world empire : diamonds, damask, and every "mongrel sect in Christendom" — Tolerance and intolerance in the East : the Ottoman, Ming, and Mughal empires — The British empire : "rebel buggers" and the "white man's burden" — The American hyperpower : tolerance and the microchip — The rise and fall of the Axis Powers : the strategic price of intolerance — The challengers : China, the European Union, and India in the twenty-first century — The day of empire : lessons of history.

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Theresa Butler, December 22, 2008 (view all comments by Theresa Butler)
I was lucky enough to see Amy Chua speak this fall at IdeaFestival in Louisville. She was a fascinating speaker and is an even better author. This book details the rise and fall of critical empires throughout the ages and shows what the US can learn from them. You don't have to be 'in' to politics to enjoy this book.
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Product Details

ISBN:
9780385524124
Subtitle:
How Hyperpowers Rise to Global dominance--and Why They Fall
Publisher:
Doubleday
Author:
Chua, Amy
Subject:
Political Science : History & Theory - General
Subject:
History & Theory - General
Subject:
International Relations - General
Subject:
History
Subject:
Imperialism
Subject:
World - General
Subject:
Imperialism -- History.
Subject:
Hegemony - History
Subject:
History & Theory
Subject:
World History-General
Subject:
Politics - General
Publication Date:
2007
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
396

Related Subjects

Day of Empire: How Hyperpowers Rise to Global dominance--and Why They Fall
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$ In Stock
Product details 396 pages Doubleday - English 9780385524124 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , A study of history's great hyperpowers--Persia, Rome, China, the Mongols, the Dutch, the British, and the United States--traces the reasons for their success and the roots of their ultimate fall, examining why multiculturalism and diversity became a liability as they triggered hatred, intolerance, conflict, and violence as she looks at the state of the American empire. 60,000 first printing.
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