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13 Things That Don't Make Sense: The Most Baffling Scientific Mysteries of Our Time

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13 Things That Don't Make Sense: The Most Baffling Scientific Mysteries of Our Time Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Science starts to get interesting when things don’t make sense.

Science’s best-kept secret is this: Even today, there are experimental results and reliable data that the most brilliant scientists can neither explain nor dismiss. In the past, similar “anomalies” have revolutionized our world, like in the sixteenth century, when a set of celestial anomalies led Copernicus to realize that the Earth goes around the sun and not the reverse, and in the 1770s, when two chemists discovered oxygen because of experimental results that defied all the theories of the day. And so, if history is any precedent, we should look to today’s inexplicable results to forecast the future of science. In 13 Things That Don’t Make Sense, Michael Brooks heads to the scientific frontier to meet thirteen modern-day anomalies and discover tomorrow’s breakthroughs.

13 Things opens at the twenty-third Solvay physics conference, where the scientists present are ready to throw up their hands over an anomaly: is it possible that the universe, rather than slowly drifting apart as the physics of the big bang had once predicted, is actually expanding at an ever-faster speed? From Solvay and the mysteries of the universe, Brooks travels to a basement in Turin to subject himself to repeated shocks in a test of the placebo response. No study has ever been able to definitively show how the placebo effect works, so why has it becomea pillar ofmedicalscience? Moreover, is 96 percent of the universe missing? Is a 1977 signal from outer space a transmission from an alien civilization? Might giant viruses explain how life began? Why are some NASA satellites speeding up as they get farther from the sun—and what does that mean for the laws of physics?

Spanning disciplines from biology to cosmology, chemistry to psychology to physics, Brooks thrillingly captures the excitement, messiness, and controversy of the battle over where science is headed. “In science,” he writes, “being stuck can be a sign that you are about to make a great leap forward. The things that don’t make sense are, in some ways, the only things that matter.”

Synopsis:

An expanded version of an article that originally appeared in New Scientist magazine offers a provocative look at thirteen of the most hotly debated topics in modern-day science and analyzes how issues from cold fusion to dark matter are changing the way scientists work and how they will shape and define science in the twenty-first century. 25,000 first printing.

Synopsis:

Science starts to get interesting when things don't make sense.

Science's best-kept secret is this: Even today, there are experimental results and reliable data that the most brilliant scientists can neither explain nor dismiss. In the past, similar anomalies have revolutionized our world, like in the sixteenth century, when a set of celestial anomalies led Copernicus to realize that the Earth goes around the sun and not the reverse, and in the 1770s, when two chemists discovered oxygen because of experimental results that defied all the theories of the day. And so, if history is any precedent, we should look to today's inexplicable results to forecast the future of science. In 13 Things That Don't Make Sense, Michael Brooks heads to the scientific frontier to meet thirteen modern-day anomalies and discover tomorrow's breakthroughs.

13 Things opens at the twenty-third Solvay physics conference, where the scientists present are ready to throw up their hands over an anomaly: is it possible that the universe, rather than slowly drifting apart as the physics of the big bang had once predicted, is actually expanding at an ever-faster speed? From Solvay and the mysteries of the universe, Brooks travels to a basement in Turin to subject himself to repeated shocks in a test of the placebo response. No study has ever been able to definitively show how the placebo effect works, so why has it becomea pillar ofmedicalscience? Moreover, is 96 percent of the universe missing? Is a 1977 signal from outer space a transmission from an alien civilization? Might giant viruses explain how life began? Why are some NASA satellites speeding up as they get farther from the sun and what does that mean for the laws of physics?

Spanning disciplines from biology to cosmology, chemistry to psychology to physics, Brooks thrillingly captures the excitement, messiness, and controversy of the battle over where science is headed. In science, he writes, being stuck can be a sign that you are about to make a great leap forward. The things that don't make sense are, in some ways, the only things that matter.

About the Author

MICHAEL BROOKS, Ph.D., is formerly the senior features editor, and now a consultant for New Scientist. His writing has appeared in The Guardian, Independent, and Observer. He lives in England.

Table of Contents

The missing universe — The pioneer anomaly — Varying constants — Cold fusion — Life — Viking — The Wow! signal — A giant virus — Death — Sex — Free will — The placebo effect — Homeopathy.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780385526739
Subtitle:
The Most Baffling Scientific Mysteries of Our Time
Publisher:
Doubleday
Author:
Brooks, Michael
Author:
Michael Brooks
Subject:
Science : General
Subject:
General
Subject:
Science
Subject:
General science
Subject:
Audio Books-Physics
Subject:
Audio Books-Science Reference
Subject:
Sale Books-Nonfiction
Subject:
Science Reference-General
Subject:
main_subject
Subject:
all_subjects
Publication Date:
20080812
Binding:
ELECTRONIC
Language:
English
Pages:
240

Related Subjects

Reference » Science Reference » General
Science and Mathematics » Popular Science » Essays

13 Things That Don't Make Sense: The Most Baffling Scientific Mysteries of Our Time
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$ In Stock
Product details 240 pages Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group - English 9780385526739 Reviews:
"Synopsis" by , An expanded version of an article that originally appeared in New Scientist magazine offers a provocative look at thirteen of the most hotly debated topics in modern-day science and analyzes how issues from cold fusion to dark matter are changing the way scientists work and how they will shape and define science in the twenty-first century. 25,000 first printing.
"Synopsis" by , Science starts to get interesting when things don't make sense.

Science's best-kept secret is this: Even today, there are experimental results and reliable data that the most brilliant scientists can neither explain nor dismiss. In the past, similar anomalies have revolutionized our world, like in the sixteenth century, when a set of celestial anomalies led Copernicus to realize that the Earth goes around the sun and not the reverse, and in the 1770s, when two chemists discovered oxygen because of experimental results that defied all the theories of the day. And so, if history is any precedent, we should look to today's inexplicable results to forecast the future of science. In 13 Things That Don't Make Sense, Michael Brooks heads to the scientific frontier to meet thirteen modern-day anomalies and discover tomorrow's breakthroughs.

13 Things opens at the twenty-third Solvay physics conference, where the scientists present are ready to throw up their hands over an anomaly: is it possible that the universe, rather than slowly drifting apart as the physics of the big bang had once predicted, is actually expanding at an ever-faster speed? From Solvay and the mysteries of the universe, Brooks travels to a basement in Turin to subject himself to repeated shocks in a test of the placebo response. No study has ever been able to definitively show how the placebo effect works, so why has it becomea pillar ofmedicalscience? Moreover, is 96 percent of the universe missing? Is a 1977 signal from outer space a transmission from an alien civilization? Might giant viruses explain how life began? Why are some NASA satellites speeding up as they get farther from the sun and what does that mean for the laws of physics?

Spanning disciplines from biology to cosmology, chemistry to psychology to physics, Brooks thrillingly captures the excitement, messiness, and controversy of the battle over where science is headed. In science, he writes, being stuck can be a sign that you are about to make a great leap forward. The things that don't make sense are, in some ways, the only things that matter.

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