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Joseph Roth: A Life in Letters

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Joseph Roth: A Life in Letters Cover

 

Synopses & Reviews

Publisher Comments:

Who would have thought that seventy-three years after Joseph Roth's lonely death in Paris, new editions of his translations would be appearing regularly? Roth, a transcendent novelist who also produced some of the most breathtakingly lyrical journalism ever written, is now being discovered by a new generation. Nine years in the making, this life through letters provides us with our most extensive portrait of Roth's calamitous life--his father's madness, his wife's schizophrenia, his parade of mistresses (each more exotic than the next), and his classic westward journey from a virtual Hapsburg shtetl to Vienna, Berlin, Frankfurt, and finally Paris.

Containing 457 newly translated letters, along with eloquent introductions that richly frame Roth's life, this book brilliantly evokes the crumbling specters of the Weimar Republic and 1930s France. Displaying Roth's ceaselessly inventive powers, it finally charts his descent into despair at a time when "the word had died, [and] men bark like dogs."

Review:

"Prolific, peripatetic, prickly, and best known in his time as a journalist, Joseph Roth (1894 — 1939) has since taken his place beside Thomas Mann (whom he loathed), Robert Musil (whom he disliked almost as much), and Alfred Döblin among the giants of 20th-century German and Austrian literature. English readers will find a tormented, perennial fist-shaker in the more than 450 letters by Roth, from 1911 to 1939 (a few addressed to him), skillfully translated and nimbly edited by Hofmann, and previously only available in a 40-year-old German-language collection. Though at times gossipy, with opinions on everyone from Thomas Mann to Austrian publishers and his own Jewish background, Roth reveals himself detesting Hitlerism early and to such a degree that from the dawn of 1933 he left Germany permanently. To his good friend and fellow writer Stefan Zweig, the recipient of many of the letters, Roth wrote, 'The barbarians have taken over. Do not deceive yourself. Hell reigns.' Roth was also no fan of Soviet communism. Alcohol addiction left Roth (The Radetzky March) in increasing desperation. Perhaps fittingly, Roth died at the edge of the world calamity he had projected." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

Book News Annotation:

This newly translated collection of the letters of Joseph Roth provides English readers with an invaluable resource for appreciating the zeitgeist of early twentieth-century Europe through the words of one of its most important commentators. Including over four hundred pieces of correspondence, the volume covers Roth's youth in a traditional Jewish Austria-Hungarian village and his education in Vienna, his work as a reporter for major German newspapers in the 1920s, and his impoverished and rootless spiral through Western Europe towards an untimely death in 1939. The texts address major themes that figure prominently in Roth's published works, including mental illness, Jewishness, home, and identity. The volume includes an introduction by renowned translator Michael Hoffman. Annotation ©2012 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Synopsis:

The monumentality of this biographical work further establishes Joseph Roth--with Kafka, Mann, and Musil--in the twentieth-century literary canon.

About the Author

Joseph Roth (1894-1939) has been admired by J. M. Coetzee, Cathleen Schine, Jeffrey Eugenides, Joseph Brodsky, and Nadine Gordimer, among others. His noted works include The Radetzky March, The Legend of the Holy Drinker, The Leviathan (his final work, published posthumously after Roth's untimely death at the age of 44) and the anthology The Collected Stories of Joseph Roth.For his translations, acclaimed poet Michael Hofmann has won the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize, the Dublin International IMPAC Award, the PEN/Book-of-the-Month Club Prize, the Helen and Kurt Wolff Translator's Prize, the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize, and The Schlegel-Tieck Prize (four times). He is the highly acclaimed translator of, among others, Kafka, Brecht, and Joseph Roth.For his translations, acclaimed poet Michael Hofmann has won the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize, the Dublin International IMPAC Award, the PEN/Book-of-the-Month Club Prize, the Helen and Kurt Wolff Translator's Prize, the Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize, and The Schlegel-Tieck Prize (four times). He is the highly acclaimed translator of, among others, Kafka, Brecht, and Joseph Roth.

Product Details

ISBN:
9780393060645
Author:
Roth, Joseph
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company
Author:
Hofmann, Michael
Subject:
Literary
Subject:
Biography-Literary
Publication Date:
20120131
Binding:
HARDCOVER
Language:
English
Pages:
512
Dimensions:
9.25 x 6.125 in

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Related Subjects

» Biography » Literary
» Fiction and Poetry » Anthologies » General
» Fiction and Poetry » Literature » A to Z

Joseph Roth: A Life in Letters New Hardcover
0 stars - 0 reviews
$39.95 In Stock
Product details 512 pages W. W. Norton & Company - English 9780393060645 Reviews:
"Publishers Weekly Review" by , "Prolific, peripatetic, prickly, and best known in his time as a journalist, Joseph Roth (1894 — 1939) has since taken his place beside Thomas Mann (whom he loathed), Robert Musil (whom he disliked almost as much), and Alfred Döblin among the giants of 20th-century German and Austrian literature. English readers will find a tormented, perennial fist-shaker in the more than 450 letters by Roth, from 1911 to 1939 (a few addressed to him), skillfully translated and nimbly edited by Hofmann, and previously only available in a 40-year-old German-language collection. Though at times gossipy, with opinions on everyone from Thomas Mann to Austrian publishers and his own Jewish background, Roth reveals himself detesting Hitlerism early and to such a degree that from the dawn of 1933 he left Germany permanently. To his good friend and fellow writer Stefan Zweig, the recipient of many of the letters, Roth wrote, 'The barbarians have taken over. Do not deceive yourself. Hell reigns.' Roth was also no fan of Soviet communism. Alcohol addiction left Roth (The Radetzky March) in increasing desperation. Perhaps fittingly, Roth died at the edge of the world calamity he had projected." Publishers Weekly (Starred Review) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
"Synopsis" by , The monumentality of this biographical work further establishes Joseph Roth--with Kafka, Mann, and Musil--in the twentieth-century literary canon.
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